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Last Movie You Watched and Rate It (Part XVI) ‎

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Old
12-08-2012, 09:22 PM
  #276
Stu Macher
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Thanks again!! The only thing i've seen Fred in was Holiday Inn, and he was terrific in it!! I've seen bits and pieces of his dancing and it's surely impressing.

Have you seen Rashomon? It was in the list of films put there by the uploader, so I figured I would check it out.. It sounds like it would be good..
I have seen Rashomon, and it is indeed good. It's not my favorite Kurosawa film, but might be my third (behind my favorite, Throne of Blood, and my second, Seven Samurai).

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12-09-2012, 01:24 AM
  #277
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Killing Them Softly (2012)

I am a huge, huge fan of The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. So naturally this is one of many follow-up films coming out this year by directors I really like and expectations were quite high. The simple conclusion is that this definitely isn't as good as Jesse James.

Now, while I say that I have to preface it by saying Jesse James was one of my top-5 films from that year. I loved it. If this had been as good, Andrew Dominik would have sky-rocketed up my favourite directors list. So while this won't be in competition for my year end top-10, it is still a more than solid movie. Dominik maintains his visual flair and the look of the scenes, especially the major points of the film, all look spectacular. The performances are definitely top notch as well. Pitt leads the cast with another great dramatic turn, and these are the type of roles where he really shines. Leads that his natural charm and effortless humour can show to help flesh out his character. The rest of the cast does a good job and I was surprised with Scoot McNairy who's only previous work I'd seen was Monsters in which I didn't particularly care for him.

On the negative I think that while I really enjoyed the fleshed out version of a relatively small story, the movie did tend to meander in certain areas. I can understand what Dominik was going for in some of the less humorous and impactful conversation scenes but I felt they slowed down the movie. I'm also a little confused with the running narrative of the election/financial crises. I think I know the relation to the story but it felt as though it was constantly in your face, to the point where I almost want to give Dominik the benefit of the doubt and assume I missed something.

This is a very Scorsese-esque film and I think Killing Them Softly is a worthy addition to the style he helped pioneer and is continued to be referenced today.

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12-09-2012, 08:06 AM
  #278
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On the negative I think that while I really enjoyed the fleshed out version of a relatively small story, the movie did tend to meander in certain areas. I can understand what Dominik was going for in some of the less humorous and impactful conversation scenes but I felt they slowed down the movie. I'm also a little confused with the running narrative of the election/financial crises. I think I know the relation to the story but it felt as though it was constantly in your face, to the point where I almost want to give Dominik the benefit of the doubt and assume I missed something.

This is a very Scorsese-esque film and I think Killing Them Softly is a worthy addition to the style he helped pioneer and is continued to be referenced today.
It hasn't quite made my top ten either (though I thought about it), but I really like its meandering nature, which is, I think, a good way to describe it. There really aren't that many scenes in the movie, and the fact that one key character in terms of screen time turns out to be totally expendable to the plot suggests to me that Dominik is going for an impressionistic and fragmented approach to thematic development. The only way I can think to explain it at the moment is this movie is more like looking at an abstract art painting than a representational painting. So it's closer to a Miro than it is to a Vermeer, more post modern than traditional.

I think this approach also partly explains the decision to ride so heavily on the annoying election/economic cynicism. It seems excessive, but it's part of the design and it does certainly hammer home one of his principle themes about the willful delusion between the country's ideals and its reality.

I hadn't thought of the Scorsese comparison, but it seems very apt.

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12-09-2012, 09:34 AM
  #279
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Good will hunting: 9 / 10
Fantastic performence by Damon and an amazing script.

TDKR: 9 / 10
The only thing which i though was bad in this movie was the hollywood ending. Alfred standing alone at the grave was ****ing sad. Then they had to ruin it all by keeping him alive It was also a little too long. Lets hope that cope wont be "Robin" as it was hinted.

One who flew over the cuckoo's nest: 5 / 10
Boring movie. The book had alot more humor in it due to its narriation.

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12-09-2012, 12:58 PM
  #280
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It hasn't quite made my top ten either (though I thought about it), but I really like its meandering nature, which is, I think, a good way to describe it. There really aren't that many scenes in the movie, and the fact that one key character in terms of screen time turns out to be totally expendable to the plot suggests to me that Dominik is going for an impressionistic and fragmented approach to thematic development. The only way I can think to explain it at the moment is this movie is more like looking at an abstract art painting than a representational painting. So it's closer to a Miro than it is to a Vermeer, more post modern than traditional.

I think this approach also partly explains the decision to ride so heavily on the annoying election/economic cynicism. It seems excessive, but it's part of the design and it does certainly hammer home one of his principle themes about the willful delusion between the country's ideals and its reality.

I hadn't thought of the Scorsese comparison, but it seems very apt.
Hilarious enough I didn't even reference my top-10 list before writing that and when I went back to it I ended up putting Killing Them Softly at number 10. Although I think that just says something about this year which I have found to be very underwhelming.

What I was referencing was a couple scenes with one character in the middle, who I believe you mentioned. I think I had that moment of "OK, I know why we are having this scene... but I'm just not having nearly enough fun with it as I had been having with Ben Mendelsohn, Scooter McNairy, or Richard Jenkins." Still, I agree with your opinion on the approach Andrew Dominik took to the film, which is probably one of my favourite aspects of the movie.


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12-09-2012, 01:00 PM
  #281
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I think my top 10 list is pretty ugly so far.

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12-09-2012, 01:23 PM
  #282
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I think my top 10 list is pretty ugly so far.
What's it look like?

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12-09-2012, 04:01 PM
  #283
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What's it look like?
Just scanning through a list of the films I've seen from what I consider 2012 releases (I now just go by the release date on Box Office Mojo), these are the 10 that I'd choose right now.

In alphabetical order:

Argo
The Avengers
End of Watch
Holy Motors
Life of Pi
The Master
Once Upon a Time in Anatolia
The Queen of Versailles
Silver Linings Playbook
Skyfall

I do like all of these movies, but if this was my end of year list, I'd think it's not the best year. Luckily, I have a few more movies that I really want to see in the next month, like Amour and Zero Dark Thirty.

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12-09-2012, 05:43 PM
  #284
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Kon Tiki (2012), directed by Joachim Ronning and Espen Sandberg: Based on the true story of Thor Heyerdahl who wanted to prove that pre-Columbian Peruvians could have sailed to Polynesia on a raft. His conclusion was based on his careful field research but when his theory was scoffed at and unanimously dismissed by other scholars, he took it upon himself to sail there himself to demonstrate the validity of his findings. In 1947, along with five other crew members, he did so on board the Kon Tiki, a large wooden raft with no propulsion other than that which wind and tide could provide. Early scenes do a good job of setting the context for this great adventure which took 101 days to complete. The events of the actual voyage are hyped a bit for dramatic purposes, sometimes a bit too much, and the other crew members, with one unfortunate exception, are a bland lot. But, even with these shortcomings, it is a tale well worth telling as this isn't the kind of adventure anybody even imagines dreaming about in this century. Kon Tiki is Norway's selection this year for Oscar consideration in the "foreign language film" category.

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Old
12-09-2012, 06:19 PM
  #285
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Cafe de Flore: 7.5/10
I would have to think, that in most reviews of Cafe de Flore, the word "ambitious" cropped up quite a bit. I wouldn't disagree. It's an impressive twisting of two seemingly unrelated stories, one in Montreal in 2011 and another in Paris in 1969. In addition to trying to figure out how these stories will come together, we're also tasked with figuring out the stories themselves, which are presented in jagged and knotted forms. To me, there's a thin line between a movie unveiling its surprises organically, and a director intentionally withholding information from the audience to create these surprises artificially. I felt more often than not, CdF fell on the side of the latter. Both timelines, and the grand connection as a whole, are so obfuscated it made me wish more time was spent on the story and a little less time on the surrounding smoke and mirrors. I was reminded of a very relevant lyric by the end of the movie - "the time is gone, the song is over, thought I'd something more to say".
But I will definitely say that the smoke and mirrors were impressive. I give the movie a lot of credit for telling a couple of interesting stories in a highly unique manner, and for making the way these stories connected credible. A heap of praise is also deserved for the soundtrack (and for the central theme of the importance of music as well). God knows that Sigur Ros don't need any accompanying pictures to evoke emotion, and "Dark Side of the Moon" already carries 40 years worth of baggage with it. But the movie used this and other music in a very authentic, natural, and credible way - rather than feeling like the director is just bragging about the stuff on his iPod, a la Cameron Crowe.
I don't typically get the urge to watch a movie a second time to better "figure it out", but I did get that feeling with Cafe de Flore. Even though I think I got the general idea, a second viewing certainly wouldn't hurt. I'd also really like to see the director's previous effort, C.R.A.Z.Y., as I've been putting that off for ages as well. If it's half as ambitious as Cafe de Flore, I'm sure it'll be worthy of interest as well.

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12-09-2012, 11:43 PM
  #286
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Cafe de Flore: 7.5/10
I would have to think, that in most reviews of Cafe de Flore, the word "ambitious" cropped up quite a bit. I wouldn't disagree. It's an impressive twisting of two seemingly unrelated stories, one in Montreal in 2011 and another in Paris in 1969. In addition to trying to figure out how these stories will come together, we're also tasked with figuring out the stories themselves, which are presented in jagged and knotted forms. To me, there's a thin line between a movie unveiling its surprises organically, and a director intentionally withholding information from the audience to create these surprises artificially. I felt more often than not, CdF fell on the side of the latter. Both timelines, and the grand connection as a whole, are so obfuscated it made me wish more time was spent on the story and a little less time on the surrounding smoke and mirrors. I was reminded of a very relevant lyric by the end of the movie - "the time is gone, the song is over, thought I'd something more to say".
But I will definitely say that the smoke and mirrors were impressive. I give the movie a lot of credit for telling a couple of interesting stories in a highly unique manner, and for making the way these stories connected credible. A heap of praise is also deserved for the soundtrack (and for the central theme of the importance of music as well). God knows that Sigur Ros don't need any accompanying pictures to evoke emotion, and "Dark Side of the Moon" already carries 40 years worth of baggage with it. But the movie used this and other music in a very authentic, natural, and credible way - rather than feeling like the director is just bragging about the stuff on his iPod, a la Cameron Crowe.
I don't typically get the urge to watch a movie a second time to better "figure it out", but I did get that feeling with Cafe de Flore. Even though I think I got the general idea, a second viewing certainly wouldn't hurt. I'd also really like to see the director's previous effort, C.R.A.Z.Y., as I've been putting that off for ages as well. If it's half as ambitious as Cafe de Flore, I'm sure it'll be worthy of interest as well.
Glad to get your thoughts. Definitely worth the wait. C.R.A.Z.Y is totally different, but very much worth seeing.

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12-10-2012, 11:01 PM
  #287
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Barbara (2012), directed by Christian Petzold: Barbara is a doctor who is exiled to the East German countryside for some unspecified indiscretion that she took part in when she was in Berlin. She is closely watched by the authorities and some of her neighbours seem to be suspicious of her as well. At the country hospital, she is befriended by Andre, a male doctor who has been exiled himself and who may be spying on her for the authorities. This is another one of those alleged thrillers that isn’t really all that thrilling, but it is certainly a good character study of a woman who wishes to escape authoritarian control but who may have other conflicts to resolve as well. In very subtle ways, the movie reveals how soul destroying living in East Germany must have been, how suspicion and decay permeate everything, even the possibility of romance. Barbara herself isn’t exactly an ingratiating character, but perhaps that is a result of being a product of this particular society. Barbara is a quiet work that leaves a strong impression. It is Germany's entry in the Oscar race for foreign language film this year.


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12-11-2012, 01:11 PM
  #288
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Sister (2012), directed by Ursula Meier: Simon, a 12-year-old boy, recklessly steals ski equipment and clothing from a mountain top ski resort. He lives with his sister who can't seem to keep a job, runs off for days with men she barely knows, and is thoroughly irresponsible. Simon has to eke out an existence for both of them, but sometimes he feels the weight of the world on his shoulders. And as we come to learn, he certainly has reason to. Though the issues are radically different, this movie reminds me a little bit of last year's Tomboy in that it is about a child facing some huge difficulties in his immediate future. Like director Celine Sciamma in the earlier film, Meier is a careful and perceptive observer of child behaviour which lends plucky Simon a readily believable authenticity that makes it easy to emphasize with his plight (it helps, too, that Kacey Mottet Klein gives a superb performance). While watching the movie I also couldn't help recalling the character of Antoine Doinel in Francois Truffaut's The 400 Blows, another Artful Dodger of a kid who makes the best out of a bad situation. Switzerland's entry in this year's Oscar sweepstakes, Sister deserves a nomination regardless of whether it gets it or not.

subtitles


Top Ten for 2012 so far

1. Amour, Haneke, France
2. A Simple Life, Hui, Hong Kong
3. Rhino Season, Ghobadi, Iran
4. Life of Pi (Ang) US
5. No, Larrain, Chile
6. Holy Motors, Carax, France
7. A Royal Affair, Arcel, Denmark
8. Elena, Zvyagintsev, Russia
9. Tabu, Gomes, Portugal
10. Sister, Meier, Switzerland


Last edited by kihei: 12-11-2012 at 05:47 PM.
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12-11-2012, 03:30 PM
  #289
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Finally got around to watching The Boondock saints.

It was a decent action only movie, was really lacking any sort of a plot though... Still, decent acting and pretty good action scenes. I was entertained so I'll give it a 7.2/10

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12-11-2012, 05:55 PM
  #290
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I watched Moonrise Kingdom last night and I think it is this year's Midnight in Paris for me. A movie from a director I don't typically like that is pretty delightful, quirky and endearing. I'm OK with it being in the Best Picture discussion.

Beasts of the Southern Wild - Didn't really like this at all. I thought the story itself was paper thin and relied too much on the little girl and father but both were pretty annoying characters and by the end I didn't care about them at all. The concept was unfortunately not fleshed out enough and the nice scenery could not overcome so many weaknesses. Not sure why it got all the love it did, since it felt like half a movie to me.

Argo - Wonderful movie that I really enjoyed. Not much to say about it other than I thought it was better than your typical political thriller and I can see why it was getting all the Best Picture Winner talk earlier. I'd say it's in the middle of the Top 10 for me.

Lincoln - There were some chintzy parts throughout and it started off with that ridiculous scene of the soldiers reciting the Gettysburg Address to Lincoln, but from there it settled in and found it's groover for the most part. There was a lot of smart humor in this that I enjoyed and was surprised by. DDL was amazing and I can see him winning even though I want Phoenix to win. This film worked because the supporting actors were all so damn good and some stole the show when they were on screen like James Spader. I wouldn't have pegged this as a Spielberg film while watching if I didn't know better. He laid off the cloying sentimentality we've all come to expect and the movie was better for it.

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12-11-2012, 06:12 PM
  #291
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I finally got a chance to see Amour, and thought it was a fantastic film. I didn't think Haneke had the heart that he showed, balancing the stark harshness of his previous films with the tenderness shown towards the elderly couple. The acting was of course wonderful, with Trintignant leading the charge. You could really see the sadness and fear in his eyes, even as he trying to be strong. I was impressed by Huppert, and glad that Haneke showed the troubles the child has with a couple struggling. While the couple simply worries about their significant other, and not themselves, the child sees the pain and frustration in both of the parents.

At the very least, it must be in my top 2 films of the year so far. I'm not willing to put it above The Master yet, but some time spent with it in my head that could change.

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12-11-2012, 06:24 PM
  #292
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Sister (2012), directed by Ursula Meier: Simon, a 12-year-old boy, recklessly steals ski equipment and clothing from a mountain top ski resort. He lives with his sister who can't seem to keep a job, runs off for days with men she barely knows, and is thoroughly irresponsible. Simon has to eke out an existence for both of them, but sometimes he feels the weight of the world on his shoulders. And as we come to learn, he certainly has reason to. Though the issues are radically different, this movie reminds me a little bit of last year's Tomboy in that it is about a child facing some huge difficulties in his immediate future. Like director Celine Sciamma in the earlier film, Meier is a careful and perceptive observer of child behaviour which lends plucky Simon a readily believable authenticity that makes it easy to emphasize with his plight (it helps, too, that Kacey Mottet Klein gives a superb performance). While watching the movie I also couldn't help recalling the character of Antoine Doinel in Francois Truffaut's The 400 Blows, another Artful Dodger of a kid who makes the best out of a bad situation. Switzerland's entry in this year's Oscar sweepstakes, Sister deserves a nomination regardless of whether it gets it or not.

subtitles


Top Ten for 2012 so far

1. Amour, Haneke, France
2. A Simple Life, Hui, Hong Kong
3. Rhino Season, Ghobadi, Iran
4. Life of Pi (Ang) US
5. No, Larrain, Chile
6. Holy Motors, Carax, France
7. A Royal Affair, Arcel, Denmark
8. Elena, Zvyagintsev, Russia
9. Tabu, Gomes, Portugal
10. Sister, Meier, Switzerland
I haven't heard of this but your review has piqued my interest. I couldn't help but think of a Canadian film from 2008 titled, "It's Not Me, I Swear!" from reading your post.

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12-11-2012, 09:37 PM
  #293
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The General - 8.5/10

I'm not going to go into detail about this.. I wasn't sure what to expect going into this film as the only other silent-films i've seen were those of Charlie Chaplin. The first 10 or so minutes passed and I found it difficult to get interested in the film.... and then it took a turn for the better.

Once Buster Keaton sat on the side of the train, which started to move down the track resulting in him moving up and down, I knew I was going to enjoy what was to come. The next 25 minutes were brilliant. The perfectly choreographed running-jump onto the old-fashioned bicycle, the running all over the locomotive, and the moments with the cannon.. I found myself actually amazed. The part with the cannon made me laugh.. having his foot stuck, and then in a last chance effort to stop it, throwing a piece of wood at it?? Brilliant.

The music was another thing though.. It DID suit the scenes, but it got to the point where it was kind of annoying when you could tell that the track had restarted.. that's not a major thing with me though.

Overall, this film was quite good. I would recommend it to anyone who has the patience to sit through a silent film and wants to see what a REAL performer looks like. I look forward to watching more of Keaton's films.


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12-11-2012, 09:44 PM
  #294
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If you liked The General, and it sounds like you did, I would suggest Sherlock Jr., which I think is equally great. Plus, it's only 45 minutes, so it's a quick and brilliant watch.

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12-11-2012, 09:50 PM
  #295
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If you liked The General, and it sounds like you did, I would suggest Sherlock Jr., which I think is equally great. Plus, it's only 45 minutes, so it's a quick and brilliant watch.
Will do, thanks. I'm getting it right now and i'll watch it once it's done. My review should be up in about 1.5 hours.

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12-11-2012, 09:59 PM
  #296
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The Bourne Legacy

6/10

What a disappointing movie. Plenty of the scenes looked like they were copied from the other Bourne movies. Also, there better be another movie, because they let you off on such a cliffhanger, it's not even funny.

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12-11-2012, 11:51 PM
  #297
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Sherlock Jr. - 9/10

First and foremost, I would like to thank Stu Macher for recommending this brilliant film to me.

This film was fantastic.. Buster Keaton's physical comedy is amazing. The scene changes in "the movie inside a movie" were just about perfect.. The way he goes to sit down but the scene quickly changes and he falls with such perfect timing. I love how he does all his own stunts as well.. true dedication to the art. Upon researching the film after watching it, I saw that during the scene where he hangs onto the tube connected to the water tank, the water made him fall to the tracks resulting in him FRACTURING HIS NECK!!

To me, the highlight of this film was the "pool/billiards" scene... although my favourite part was when he was shadowing the suspect. It was brilliantly choreographed, the way he was able to walk so close behind the suspect and not trip both of them.. and then when the cigarette was flicked back, Buster caught it!!

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12-12-2012, 12:03 AM
  #298
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Argo

10/10

Seriously one of the best movies I ever watched.

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12-12-2012, 12:13 AM
  #299
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Argo

10/10

Seriously one of the best movies I ever watched.

What are some of your other favorites off the cuff. I had not interest in seeing it but if your tastes are at all similar to mine then I might check oit out based on your recomendation.

I like Ben Affleck (not counting Gigli/Pearl Harbor, feel free to flame away) and am rooting for him to do well here.

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12-12-2012, 01:15 AM
  #300
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Somersault (2004), directed by Cate Shortland: Heidi (Abbie Cornish), a teenage girl, kisses her mother’s boyfriend and realizes she has made an unforgivable mistake. With her mother angrily distraught, Heidi leaves immediately and strikes out on her own, ending up in a small Australian town far away from her home. She has no friends and no money, and she is ready to do just about anything to survive. Eventually she finds lodging, and in Joe (Sam Worthington), maybe even a possible boyfriend, but she is not having an easy time of it. Too many of the townspeople see her as a low-life drifter not worthy of their respect. Heidi, unassertive and not especially smart, contributes to that impression because she seems to be making it all up as she goes along, coquettish in a Lolita-ish way one moment, needy the next, not ever really sure of her footing in a world of strangers. Cornish, a pale beauty who was 22 years old when she made this film, plays Heidi closer to 16 years old, and an inexperienced, uncertain 16 at that. Joe is the one person whom she wants to turn to for love, but she scares him a little and besides he has problems of his own to work out. It’s a well-crafted work, and with Cornish’s fine performance, with Worthington looking like a star in the making, and with supportive direction from Shortland, Somersault clearly earns its high regard. It sure makes me want to see the director’s much praised recent work Lore as soon as possible.

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