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Last Movie You Watched and Rate It (Part XVI) ‎

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Old
12-15-2012, 01:02 PM
  #326
McDeepika
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Old Joy - 7/10

This movie was very hard to rate. The 7 really doesn't mean a lot at this point. Like Meek's Cutoff and Wendy and Lucy, this movie is very slow. There is a fine line when it comes to slow movies, and unfortunately at times, Old Joy crosses that line into bland territorry. It's really strange, but I have enjoyed the movie a lot more after it's been done than when I was actually watching it. Individually, the scenes are boring, but the film really comes together once it is finished. Without a doubt, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. The final scene was also extremely powerful. Reichardt showed the same skill making this that she always does. The scenery is beautiful yet not glamourous. Like with all her movies, everything in the film serves to draw attention to the story, not distract from it.

The Bourne Legacy - 3/10

I liked the original trilogy but this movie just seemed pointless. It didn't make a lot of sense, the chase sequence was far too long and it randomly ended without feeling finished.

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12-15-2012, 01:58 PM
  #327
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Originally Posted by Hemskyfanboy83 View Post
Old Joy - 7/10

This movie was very hard to rate. The 7 really doesn't mean a lot at this point. Like Meek's Cutoff and Wendy and Lucy, this movie is very slow. There is a fine line when it comes to slow movies, and unfortunately at times, Old Joy crosses that line into bland territorry. It's really strange, but I have enjoyed the movie a lot more after it's been done than when I was actually watching it. Individually, the scenes are boring, but the film really comes together once it is finished. Without a doubt, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. The final scene was also extremely powerful. Reichardt showed the same skill making this that she always does. The scenery is beautiful yet not glamourous. Like with all her movies, everything in the film serves to draw attention to the story, not distract from it.
I haven't seen it, but it sounds interesting. Your review also made me think that there are an awful lot of talented female movie directors around right now, more than at any other time of movie history that I can think of. In addition to Reichardt, off the top of my head they include:

Anne Hui
Sofia Coppola
Kathryn Bigelow
Catherine Breillat
Claire Denis
Sarah Polley
Ursula Meier
Susanne Bier
Deepa Mehta
Margarethe von Trotta
Celine Sciamma

I'm sure I'm leaving out some, too.

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Old
12-15-2012, 06:12 PM
  #328
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Safety Not Guaranteed, good film. Someone cynical might say it's too hipster-ish but it's not at all tbh, I like it because it's a bit unique and is not too intense, just a nice light movie.

Also cracked me up how it has Nick from New Girl, Pete from The League, and the chick from Parks & Rec in it.

I was also watching a bit of an older movie from the early 90s, Manhattan Murder Mystery by Woody Allen....I didn't feel like watching at the time so I just read the plot summary but seemed like a good movie, highly rated. I haven't seen much of his stuff but Woody Allen's acting is weird.

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12-15-2012, 10:54 PM
  #329
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Originally Posted by chuppa chupp View Post
I haven't heard of this but your review has piqued my interest. I couldn't help but think of a Canadian film from 2008 titled, "It's Not Me, I Swear!" from reading your post.
And your comment piqued my curiosity, too. I watched this film tonight. While they are very, very different movies, the longer that It's Not Me, I Swear went on, the more similarities that I saw between the two films. The Quebec film has a much lighter feel early on, and it seems contrived some times, but somehow as it progressed, it pulled me in. There are definitely some ways in which the two kids are kindred spirits--the feelings the kids have toward their mother, that sense of longing for what isn't there, is somewhat similar. And the desperation that they feel about life is very similar. I think Sister ultimately cuts deeper and is better directed and acted, but I think it is safe to say that if you liked It's Not Me, I Swear, there is an excellent chance that you will find Sister well worth seeing as well.

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12-16-2012, 06:26 PM
  #330
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The Hobbit

It's not Lord of The Rings, but it's far from being The Phantom Menace as well. It's not gonna win any Oscars apart from maybe some of the technical ones. But I really liked the movie, it moves along at a much slower pace than the LOTR movies did, but I didn't find that to be a problem. The only time I found he movie to drag a bit was the scenes in Hobbiton, which probably could have been cut shorter, or some of them saved for a LOTR like extended version made for fans of Tolkien. As others have noted Martin Freeman does a good job as Bilbo, he really embodies the out-of-place feeling that Bilbo has among the Dwarfs really well. The Hobbit is also more light hearted than LOTR, which is to be expected since The Hobbit as a book is a children's book, while LOTR is more complex and dark. It's a very long movie at almost 3 hours, and I'm not sure how Peter Jackson is gonna stretch the material into 3 movies this long. But I did not feel that this movie was too long, in fact the 3 hours seemed to go by very fast, which is probably a sign that I was well entertained.

If the two other movies are as good as this, it's gonna be a very good prequel trilogy.

In case it interests anyone, I saw it 24FPS 3D.

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12-16-2012, 06:52 PM
  #331
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Finally watched Pulp Fiction and I loved it. I could watch Uma Thurman dance all day

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12-16-2012, 10:23 PM
  #332
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Originally Posted by kihei View Post
I haven't seen it, but it sounds interesting. Your review also made me think that there are an awful lot of talented female movie directors around right now, more than at any other time of movie history that I can think of. In addition to Reichardt, off the top of my head they include:

Anne Hui
Sofia Coppola
Kathryn Bigelow
Catherine Breillat
Claire Denis
Sarah Polley
Ursula Meier
Susanne Bier
Deepa Mehta
Margarethe von Trotta
Celine Sciamma

I'm sure I'm leaving out some, too.
Ya there sure is. I am not familiar with some of the foreign names on your list but I wouldn't mind checking them out.

I have been meaning to re-watch Lost in Translation for some time now. I watched it several years ago, but my taste in movies was way different back then. I had a very short attention span, and I didn't care for it at the time. I watched Somewhere just last year and I absolutely loved it.

Also great to see Sarah Polley on your list. It's always cool for me to see talented Canadians succeed. I thought Take This Waltz was well made, and Away From Her sounds super interesting. I plan to watch it some time this week.

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12-16-2012, 10:36 PM
  #333
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Originally Posted by Hemskyfanboy83 View Post
Ya there sure is. I am not familiar with some of the foreign names on your list but I wouldn't mind checking them out.

I have been meaning to re-watch Lost in Translation for some time now. I watched it several years ago, but my taste in movies was way different back then. I had a very short attention span, and I didn't care for it at the time. I watched Somewhere just last year and I absolutely loved it.

Also great to see Sarah Polley on your list. It's always cool for me to see talented Canadians succeed. I thought Take This Waltz was well made, and Away From Her sounds super interesting. I plan to watch it some time this week.
I loved Somewhere, too, I think it was a very underrated movie. And Lost in Translation worked better for me the second time I saw it. I don't know why for sure, but it really did. Sofia's become one on my favourite contemporary directors. You should put Polley's Stories We Tell on your list, too. It's a documentary about her family, but it is very involving and very consistent with the rest of her work. Away from Her is well acted and I found it incredibly moving in a quiet sort of way.

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12-16-2012, 11:03 PM
  #334
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Kihei:

Where and how do you hear of and watch so many movies that a lot of people don't know of (for example, you always have so many foreign films in your top 10)

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12-17-2012, 12:04 AM
  #335
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Lincoln: 7/10
The biggest thing about Lincoln, for me, is that it confirms that Spielberg has not in fact completely lost his marbles after last year's unbearable War Horse. Lincoln is, by contrast...well, mature.
I don't really have a horse (eesh) in this race - biopics don't generally appeal to me, and history and politics are not my two main fields of interest. Nor do I have much of an affinity for Spielberg. I was mostly interested in the movie to see Daniel Day-Lewis' performance, which was excellent of course (but still behind Phoenix and Lavant, for me). Sally Fields was great as well. Tommy Lee Jones was a little bit predictable in a curmudgeonly role, but he did fine. Everything was fine, really, to the point of feeling mechanical - there were very few surprises and, in the end, if you had to picture a Lincoln biopic starring Day-Lewis directed by Spielberg, didn't you predict it would turn out exactly like this? The emotion it roused in me was pretty faint - I didn't feel the tension or the catharsis when what you knew would happen, happened. Fine, fine, fine; that was my main impression.

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12-17-2012, 01:58 AM
  #336
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Kihei:

Where and how do you hear of and watch so many movies that a lot of people don't know of (for example, you always have so many foreign films in your top 10)
I think best way is to look at film festivals. Primarily Toronto and Cannes, while they go on lots of reviews come out for many high-profile foreign films. Venice and Berlin are also good festivals but also have a fair amount of overlap. Check out what made the cut as well as what sounds interesting or won awards. Also, during the fall/winter each country usually declares their nominee for the best foreign film Oscar. Other than that, for me, it's just about keeping tabs on directors/actors I like and trends in certain countries.

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12-17-2012, 09:35 AM
  #337
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Kihei:

Where and how do you hear of and watch so many movies that a lot of people don't know of (for example, you always have so many foreign films in your top 10)
Toronto is a huge factor. The city has always been very friendly toward international film, and numerous theatres will show such films on an occasion or on a semi-regular basis. I have access to about 75 film festivals a year, including the Toronto International Film Festival and the Hot Docs Film Festival. Plus, lately TIFF Bell Lightbox has been a big help. It is a theatre complex in downtown Toronto with four theatres that screen international films and interesting retrospectives all year long. Plus, I am doing research for a writing project and using its library which has copies of about 60% of the movies ever screened at TIFF, which is what enabled me to see, for instance, This Is Not a Film last week, which has yet to play Toronto after appearing at TIFF in 2011. Free of charge, I might add. It's like having an embarrassment of riches in this city. Plus I have a pair of clever daughters, far more technologically savvy than me, who can find me esoteric films on the net on occasion.

Keep in mind too, that I am about twelve times older than almost all of you guys. I don't actually read much on film at all, but I know which sources to go to when I want to find out what is going on, and I teethed on the great sixties and seventies European directors, which goes a long way to explaining my taste in cinema. It also means that I have a tendency to pay a lot of attention to directors, in general. So if a relatively obscure director like, say, Jerzy Skolimowski, pops up with a new movie, I make note and try to see it. So I can't hit a curve ball anymore, but experience counts for something.

Finally, I just grew up in a time when everybody seemed to go to international films on a regular basis. It wasn't like the Bond movies were in one category and the Truffaut movies were in another. They both were in the same category of "interesting movies" and the only question was which one would you go to first (Truffaut usually for me--no surprise, I'd guess). I was immersed in the stuff from the time I was 12 years old. Many of you guys have to dig much harder to see international films, and, believe me, I really respect that.

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12-17-2012, 05:26 PM
  #338
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Bourne Legacy, The -- 6/10
Generally heard mixed/bad reviews about the latest bourne movie, and for the first half of the movie or so I was wondering why, I was enjoying it as much as I did the others. Then they went to the Philippines and I understood, the movie takes a pretty big nose drive from there.

Dark Knight Rises -- 7.5ish/10
I really enjoyed this movie in the theaters, even though there were things that bothered me about, the hype prevailed. But upon watching it again, i wasn't nearly as pleased with this as I was when I first saw it.

For such a massive budget action movie they really seemed to skimp on the effects, I noticed this mostly during gun fights. Almost every explosion/bullet impact looked really cheap/fake. For explosions, big sound seemed to be lacking making them almost unnoticeable and bullet impacts seemed to be a spark only. It really made it look like they were using a tv budget instead. The lack of attention to detail really ruined the final 30min action sequence for me, I found it difficult to sit through the second time. And the scene where the cops get in their uniforms and charge banes men.. utterly ridiculous. Banes men were armed with "tanks" and machine guns. The police had pistols and where bottle necked. It would've been a blood bath, yet somehow ended in a hand to hand combat situation.

I'm not really sure what it is, but Chris Nolan seems to have a style of filming that I really like. I don't really know how to describe it, but the way he sets up his filming seems to make scenes have more presence/importance.

John Carter -- 6/10
I Had no idea what this movie was before I saw it (apparently it's based on a series of books), all I had heard that it was one of the biggest box office disasters in ages. It ended up being okay entertainment after all, I was expecting something considerably worse. My biggest gripe with the movie was the poor dialogue. There was one word in particular (jeddak) that seemed to mean 'king', I wouldn't be surprised if it was said over 100 times in this movie.

Looper -- 7.5/10
Started out not liking this movie, the way they attempted to portray this neo-society fell flat for me. But once that part of the movie was gone, and you were no longer subjected to scenes whose sole purpose was to show how the new world is, I started to enjoy it. The ending was a little disappointing (would like to have seen a bit more about the childs future).

Moonrise Kingdom -- 8/10
One of my favorite movies of the year, recommend checking it out.

Project X -- 6/10
This is what it is, mindless fantasy that allows anyone to imagine what it would've been like if you could have a hollywood scale party back in highschool. The movie was basically a 1.5hr uncensored music video/redband trailer.

Resident Evil: Retribution -- 1/10
Just brutal. Seriously, I was embarrassed watching this. After watching things like this I've always wondered if the people who are involved in it and who are responsible for making it look back at the final product and rethink their career choices. Movies like this make me wish I could be an exec at a big studio, movies like this wouldn't be allowed into the public (maybe give them to prisons).

edit:
The Hobbit -- 8/10
I'm a big fan of lotr/tolkien/and PJ doing tolkien and this movie lived up to my expectations. Some people complain about the extra stuff they throw in that deviates from the book, but I absolutely love that. I wish they'd add more and make the movies longer. Any extra bit of lotr lore then can shove into the movie, the better.

I saw it in 48fps 3d, I have mixed feelings about the 48fps, some scenes seem like that they were made for it, others seemed like they should've done without it. 3d, as always was fairly unecessaru, only one of the 3d films I've seen seemed to really work with 3d, and that was avatar. I'll be seeing The Hobbit again, but I think I'll avoid 3d and maybe even see it in regular movie format for comparisons sake. 48fps probably has a place with tons of cgi, but when it comes to humans on scene, perhaps not.


Last edited by Dave: 12-17-2012 at 05:42 PM.
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Old
12-17-2012, 07:30 PM
  #339
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Originally Posted by kihei View Post
I haven't seen it, but it sounds interesting. Your review also made me think that there are an awful lot of talented female movie directors around right now, more than at any other time of movie history that I can think of. In addition to Reichardt, off the top of my head they include:

Anne Hui
Sofia Coppola
Kathryn Bigelow
Catherine Breillat
Claire Denis
Sarah Polley
Ursula Meier
Susanne Bier
Deepa Mehta
Margarethe von Trotta
Celine Sciamma

I'm sure I'm leaving out some, too.
There may be more good ones around the world than before, but the number of female directors in Hollywood is still shamefully low. In fact, females made up 9% of Hollywood directors in 1998, but that has now fallen to just 5%.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/womenandh...s-to-5-percent

I don't know if it's any better in Europe and Asia, so I can't really comment on that.

I also read an article earlier this year (which I'm attempting to track down without much luck) that talked fairly in-depth about how female directors who direct a flop tend to be punished much more in terms of future directing opportunities, compared to male directors with similar career success.

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12-17-2012, 08:17 PM
  #340
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Juan of the Dead (2012), directed by Alejandro Brugués: Juan of the Dead is a very funky zombie movie out of Cuba of all places. Juan and his friends are definitely low rent sorts of guys who have managed to just barely scrape by through most of their adult lives. So when an infestation of zombies suddenly creates havoc in Havana, Juan sees financial opportunity in liquidating the undead who are, for the most part, very slow and easily dispatched. He decides to open a business called “Juan of the Dead,” whose motto is “We kill your loved ones.” The movie is simultaneously a spoof of other zombie movies and an attempt at a little social satire about conditions in Cuba. It’s sloppy and slapdash and pretty much a hit-or-miss affair. Much of the humour is of the decidedly crude variety, and the lion’s share of the budget seems to have been spent on blood splatter effects. These shortcomings, however, don’t stop it from intermittently being very funny. It’s one of those movies people should not go out of their way to see, but if somehow one was in just the right mood…it might work. As Daily Mail critic Christopher Tookey points out, the film is “probably best enjoyed while drunk.”

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12-17-2012, 09:34 PM
  #341
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My local film festival showed Juan of the Dead. People liked it so much that we added a couple more showtimes the next day for it. Probably helps that we are in an area with a huge Cuban population (Tampa), though. It was a fun movie and I'd agree that seeing it drunk would most likely make it even better.

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12-18-2012, 12:06 AM
  #342
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Gandu (2011), directed by Q: Gandu is like the ultimate anti-Bollywood, edgy, angry, brazenly ultra-hip Indian film. I could be wrong but as far as I know it is the only edgy, angry, brazenly ultra-hip Indian film, but I haven't seen this director's other works. As a piece of purely audacious direction it reminded me a little of Love Exposure, minus the romantic element. Gandu (his name is a slang term for a body orifice) is an uneducated young loser with no future who lives with his sister, a kept woman. He survives through her generosity and by stealing money from her lover while the couple are having sex. Gandu is going nowhere fast, and he is very pissed off about it. He makes friends with Ricksha, another young man with no future either despite his menial job. Gandu fantasizes about winning a lottery or becoming a punky, rappy alternative rock singer (great soundtrack by the way). The second half of the film may or may not be a drug-induced fantasy, hard to tell. The whole film is written, stunningly shot (99% in black and white) and directed by somebody named Q, and he is wickedly talented. Some of his moves are worthy of Godard. And I really do think this director wants to start an Indian New Wave all by himself. The script touches on drugs, porn, rap music, hopelessness, anger, with touches of explicit sexuality thrown in for good measure. Yes, the film is self-indulgent, overheated and aggressive, and character development isn't always a strong suit. But, what can I say, it was a trip and a half.

Later note: Q turns out to be Qaushiq Mukherjee, and this is his fourth film. Definitely a dirctor to watch in the future.

subtitles

Top Ten for 2012 so far

1. Amour, Haneke, France
2. A Simple Life, Hui, Hong Kong
3. Rhino Season, Ghobadi, Iran
4. Life of Pi (Ang) US
5. No, Larrain, Chile
6. Holy Motors, Carax, France
7. A Royal Affair, Arcel, Denmark
8. Elena, Zvyagintsev, Russia
9. Tabu, Gomes, Portugal
10. Sister, Meier, Switzerland
10a. Gandu, Q, India


Last edited by kihei: 12-18-2012 at 12:21 PM.
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12-18-2012, 06:34 AM
  #343
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The Hobbit, it was amazing. Saw it at 48fps and was well worth it and is no big deal once you get use to it. The story was well told and it leads well into the second film. 8/10

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12-19-2012, 11:55 AM
  #344
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Amour: 10/10
Was it the film itself, or the surprise lack of English subtitles that forced me to hang on to every spoken word harder than I've had to since I was a child? And there was so much silence. Masterfully utilized - with no long, contemplative take ever exceeding its perfect length. It was exhilerating and tragic and painful. I was exhausted after it was over, deciding it was a perfect film I don't want to see again for a very, very long time. When the quiet movie ended we rose quietly with wet eyes and exited into the quiet, rainy, snowy, slushy streets and walked back towards home, quietly ruminating on strength and love and courage, sharing reminisces of our own grandparents. Secretly wondering about our own futures. About our own strength. We should all be so lucky to be moved so profoundly by art at least once in our lives.

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12-19-2012, 12:09 PM
  #345
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Amour: 10/10
Was it the film itself, or the surprise lack of English subtitles that forced me to hang on to every spoken word harder than I've had to since I was a child? And there was so much silence. Masterfully utilized - with no long, contemplative take ever exceeding its perfect length. It was exhilerating and tragic and painful. I was exhausted after it was over, deciding it was a perfect film I don't want to see again for a very, very long time. When the quiet movie ended we rose quietly with wet eyes and exited into the quiet, rainy, snowy, slushy streets and walked back towards home, quietly ruminating on strength and love and courage, sharing reminisces of our own grandparents. Secretly wondering about our own futures. About our own strength. We should all be so lucky to be moved so profoundly by art at least once in our lives.
After watching it, I had the same feelings. Really glad you thought so highly of it.


Last edited by kihei: 12-19-2012 at 02:36 PM.
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12-19-2012, 06:43 PM
  #346
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Brave - 9.5/10

Don Juan Demarco - 7.5/10

Private Resort - 6.5/10

Cry Baby - 8/10

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead - 8.5/10

The Watch - 7/10


Last edited by George Maharis: 12-20-2012 at 06:20 AM.
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12-20-2012, 11:34 AM
  #347
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My Joy (2011), directed by Sergei Loznitsa 7 stars: A trucker starts on a journey into the Belarusian wilderness and gets lost near a village in the middle of nowhere. Eventually trying to get some sleep, he parks his truck off the road in a field and is accosted by a trio of derelicts. At which point, traditional story structure goes right out the window and the film takes a turn for the perverse as what follows plays like an ongoing, but very confusing nightmare. This film starts out like a very glum road movie and recounts incidents that, while they are not very exciting, at least make sense. But then once the trucker and the derelicts have their confrontation, the movie shifts direction in a manner that is reminiscent of Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s radical approach to film structure. Suddenly we seem to be in a very different movie, as events shift almost entirely away from the trucker to focus on other characters, past and present. All and all, the movie is a very bleak, disorienting experience. Somewhat disconcertingly, though, the more confusing it gets, the more interesting it becomes. My Joy suggests that Loznitsa, who in the past devoted himself almost exclusively to making documentaries, is a talented director with a very bright future.

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12-20-2012, 05:38 PM
  #348
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History of Violence- Was kind of bored after I got to the halfway point. 7/10.
Macgruber- I know I'm gonna catch crap for this, but I really enjoyed the movie, and I got a few laughs. So.. 7.5/10.

I'm sorry for anyone devastated by Macgruber being higher than History of Violence

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12-20-2012, 10:39 PM
  #349
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Found Memories (2012), directed by Julia Murat: In a tiny settlement in rural Brazil, a little community of old people go about their day, repeating what they do every day: bake bread, engage in familiar rituals, attend mass, eat lunch at a communal table. Into this quiet existence, a young woman arrives from where we don't know and why we don't know. She shakes things up but just a little bit, respectful of the villagers and seeming comfortable amidst the tranquility that she has found. She is a photographer and she makes friends with the old woman who bakes bread. It turns out that photography has played a considerable role in both their lives. The movie is very slow, but appropriately so. It's about the texture of people's lives. The characters are as rich as any that you would find in Gabriel Garcia Marquez novel. One old man proposes a toast to dying when our time has come. Why, he is asked. Because no one ever dies a day before. Found Memories certainly isn't for everybody, but if you have the patience for it, it is a lovely experience. A contemplative work, the movie is the cinematic equivalent of being alone on a quiet shore watching the sun set over a lake in northern Ontario. I really liked it.

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Last edited by kihei: 12-20-2012 at 10:55 PM.
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12-21-2012, 03:03 AM
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McDeepika
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Arthur Christmas - 8/10

It wasn't maybe as funny as I had hoped, but there were some very clever moments that made me smile/laugh. I really enjoyed the premise. This was not your typical Santa Claus family. The former, current and future Santa's all seemed more interested in competing with each other than actually making the children happy. They all want to be rock stars while the youngest Santa is simply in it for the music. It was pretty powerful when he came to the realization that his idols were all sell-outs. My only regret is not being able to see it in 3D. I imagine the sleigh ride would have looked great in the theater

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