HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > Non-Sports > Sciences
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Sciences A place to discuss natural, applied & social sciences, along with any other academically-oriented topics of interest to membership.

The human microbiome

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
11-12-2012, 02:04 AM
  #1
Fugu
Administrator
HFBoards
 
Fugu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Country:
Posts: 29,482
vCash: 500
The human microbiome

http://www.economist.com/node/21560523


One of the more fascinating topics in biology/medicine today. This article offers a nice overview:

Quote:
That bacteria can cause disease is no revelation. But the diseases in question are. Often, they are not acute infections of the sort 20th-century medicine has been so good at dealing with (and which have coloured doctors’ views of bacteria in ways that have made medical science slow to appreciate the richness and relevance of people’s microbial ecosystems). They are, rather, the chronic illnesses that are now, at least in the rich world, the main focus of medical attention. For, from obesity and diabetes, via heart disease, asthma and multiple sclerosis, to neurological conditions such as autism, the microbiome seems to play a crucial role.
...
One way to think of the microbiome is as an additional human organ, albeit a rather peculiar one. It weighs as much as many organs (about a kilogram, or a bit more than two pounds). And although it is not a distinct structure in the way that a heart or a liver is distinct, an organ does not have to have form and shape to be real. The immune system, for example, consists of cells scattered all around the body but it has the salient feature of an organ, namely that it is an organised system of cells.
The microbiome, too, is organised. Biology recognises about 100 large groups of bacteria, known as phyla, that each have a different repertoire of biochemical capabilities. Human microbiomes are dominated by just four of these phyla: the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Clearly, living inside a human being is a specialised existence that is appropriate only to certain types of bug.

Fugu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-12-2012, 08:00 AM
  #2
xX Hot Fuss
Registered User
 
xX Hot Fuss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 10,585
vCash: 500
We just learned about this is Biology a few weeks ago. Very cool stuff. Especially when you consider that these "foreign" organisms are just as important to our own bodies as our own cells are. They play such a big role in our biology, i'm surprised i havn't heard about this earlier.

xX Hot Fuss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-13-2012, 07:49 AM
  #3
Stories
Hockey scientist
 
Stories's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Bethesda, MD
Country: United States
Posts: 6,298
vCash: 500
Expect a lot of interesting research to come out of this area soon. We have several labs here that are working on this area and cancer.

Stories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-13-2012, 09:08 AM
  #4
beowulf
Poster of the Year!
 
beowulf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ottawa
Country: Canada
Posts: 35,469
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to beowulf
I remember reading something about a researcher who is using this idea as a way to potential cure "death" as he puts it.

beowulf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-13-2012, 08:18 PM
  #5
zytz
lumberjack
 
zytz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 6,798
vCash: 500
Love this kind of stuff. For as much as people are impressed by the enormity of space and the forces at work, I'm fascinated by the forces at work in the human body on a cellular level. So many things working in perfect unison to make the simplest things possible- I feel this area in particular has a lot of potential.

zytz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2012, 07:16 PM
  #6
PSUCapsFan
Registered User
 
PSUCapsFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Irvine, CA
Country: United States
Posts: 990
vCash: 500
Aren't the mitochondria in our cells originally a foreign species with there own unique genome?

PSUCapsFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2012, 07:23 PM
  #7
AfroThunder396
Lou's Secret Sauce
 
AfroThunder396's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Hamburg, NY
Country: United States
Posts: 21,627
vCash: 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSUCapsFan View Post
Aren't the mitochondria in our cells originally a foreign species with there own unique genome?
That's the theory. Chloroplasts in plant cells too.

Both have their own DNA and membranes, we assume they were originally free-floating prokaryotes.

AfroThunder396 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2012, 02:34 PM
  #8
Fugu
Administrator
HFBoards
 
Fugu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Country:
Posts: 29,482
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSUCapsFan View Post
Aren't the mitochondria in our cells originally a foreign species with there own unique genome?
Quote:
Originally Posted by AfroThunder396 View Post
That's the theory. Chloroplasts in plant cells too.

Both have their own DNA and membranes, we assume they were originally free-floating prokaryotes.

To add to AfroThunder's post, mitochondria are passed along in the mother's ovum as discrete units, which means it's separate from the 23 chromosomes you get from each parent. Once cell division commences, the mitochondria are simply passed along in every cell.

Fugu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:41 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2014 All Rights Reserved.