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Help: Two foot stop

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Old
02-02-2005, 12:37 AM
  #1
Yes Im Peter Ing
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Help: Two foot stop

Hello there.

I recently stepped (back) onto the ice for the first time in over a decade. Being a regular rollerblader, it didn't take me long to get up to speed on the basics: decent stride, cross-over, semi-competent backwards skating. And so on.

Yet the one 'basic skill' that still eludes me is the two foot stop. For the life me, despite endless attempts, hours of practice, and much soaring of the ankles, I just can't seem to perform this move.

Does anyone have any tips on how to pull this move off? Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks.

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Old
02-02-2005, 08:40 AM
  #2
Sticks of Fury
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You can try this website.

http://www.powerskating.ca/

The topright picture with the hockey stick on the ice is the two foot stop video if you click on it.

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02-03-2005, 03:03 PM
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Icer
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My coach doesn't even teach the traditional two foot hockey stop any more. Instead he's teaching us to drag our back foot and stop with our feet apart rather than together. The reason for this is that in the traditional hockey stop, you can only move in one direction. If you stop with your feet spread apart, you can move in either direction.

The drill we do is set up four cones in a zig zag pattern. Take a few strides to the first cone and stop. Skate to the second cone and stop with the opposite foot. Skate to the third cone and stop. Skate to the fourth cone and stop with your opposite foot. Bonus points if you snow the cone.


Last edited by Icer: 02-03-2005 at 03:10 PM.
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Old
02-03-2005, 06:14 PM
  #4
bleedgreen
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i play roller and ice, the problem is you dont have the strength on the outside edges, just your inside ones....thats from roller. i find that people who have trouble arent bending the knee on the inside leg enough. you tend to keep all your weight on the outside leg, because thats how youre comfortable. focus on the inside leg, bending the knee and holding the weight more. one drill to be more comfortable is to practice skating down the rink one leg at a time. take one stride towards the boards and do a half moon turn on the outside edge until you are going into the exact opposite direction. dont put the other foot down until youve completed the turn, then push off onto the other foot and do the same thing. go down the rink doing this. you can also practice the inside edges the same way. when it comes to learning to stop, there is no subtitute for practice. spending hours doing it over and over is 90% of the battle, having someone tell you when your doing something wrong occasionally is 10%.

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02-04-2005, 02:24 AM
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Accord
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I had the same problem when I was younger around 10 or so. My coach taught me this move which I regularly use in games and when doing suicides. Basically, just start at the goal line and skate to the blue line but instead of stopping as hard as you can, stop so you spray up some ice but immediately use your momentum to transition yourself into skating backwards, sideways from where you stopped so when you stop sideways you continue going that same direction backwards. Just do suicides with this move never stopping once eventually you'll be able to easily stop with two feet without even thinking about it.

I'm not sure if my description was easy to understand or not, so i'll try and explain it in a slightly different way. What you want to do is basically skate like you're skating on the letter L. You skate as hard as you can and when you stop you use your momentum to keep skating backwards then just twist your body and skate forward and keep skating in this L pattern. When you do this, you'll be skating then you'll stop sideways but instead of coming to a complete stop you'll begin skating backwards sideways from where your stopped.

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02-04-2005, 02:49 PM
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Yes Im Peter Ing
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Thanks guys, these drills sound helpful.

I'll start using them the next time I get on the ice. I'll let you know it goes.

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Old
02-07-2005, 11:13 AM
  #7
LordHelmet
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I started playing three years ago and it took me a while to learn to stop. My problem was that I couldn't get the blades to slide, all they'd do is dig in and throw me into a turn. The harder I tried to slide, the more my edges dug in and the farther I got from stopping.

I took a clinic and pulled one of the coaches aside. I asked him what I was doing wrong. He watched my try one stop and immediately said; "Easy, you're putting everything on your inside edge. Flatten your edges out.." I tried it again - I did the same hard turning motion but rolled my ankle upright a little more. This way, I was on both edges of both skates equally, and I got a little bit of a scrape.

It took about 3-4 hours of practice, but after that I had good stops going in both directions..

So - long story short - stopping is all about your edges. Don't just load up on the inside edge. To me it feels like I'm rolling my ankle outwards so that the skate is more vertical. When I first figured it out, it felt weird, but now it's second nature..

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Old
02-08-2005, 08:52 PM
  #8
futurcorerock
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Meh... i have the same problem. I'll go to twist to the side and my skates will line up and i'll lose my balance. Im not sure what i'm doing wrong because i'm ususally riding on the runner and I'll go into the turn and just kinda slide across a bit while turning.

Ironically, I've used the habit of stopping backwardsd by turning one blade sideways while on the runner and then slowly pushing the blade back which causes the blade to dig into the ice and put a line of shavings behind it.

Videos would help immensely! The one's in the tutorial didnt elaborate much

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