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How was the Grand Canyon formed? Not by the water of a lake flood release

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12-20-2012, 11:09 AM
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LadyStanley
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How was the Grand Canyon formed? Not by the water of a lake flood release

http://news.discovery.com/earth/gran...mkcpgn=rssnws1

Geologist debunks theory that ancient lakes suddenly released their waters in flood to create Grand Canyon

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12-20-2012, 11:32 AM
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octopi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyStanley View Post
http://news.discovery.com/earth/gran...mkcpgn=rssnws1

Geologist debunks theory that ancient lakes suddenly released their waters in flood to create Grand Canyon
Well, they can't possibly rule out a large lake being some part of it at some point. Something that large was in all probability caused by a variety of things, including water, erosion, earthquake, landslide over eons.

Also on a slightly different vein,I've always wondered how they tell the difference between ancient impact craters and ancient volcanic calderas. I'd think it's possible to get the two confused if enough time has passed, also due to the force of impact the two need not be mutually exclusive.

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12-20-2012, 11:57 AM
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I thought this was ruled out a long time ago.

The Grand Canyon was formed by upheavel, hence why you're at 6-7,000ft elevation when you're there.

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12-20-2012, 01:31 PM
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And here I thought that the grand canyon was carved by Noah's Ark hitting it during the Flood according to that former classmate of mine that used to huff paint.

Interesting, though. Not going to claim to know nearly enough about geology, but I was under the impression that water erosion was the cause. Nice learning something new.

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12-20-2012, 03:29 PM
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LadyStanley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by octopi View Post
Also on a slightly different vein,I've always wondered how they tell the difference between ancient impact craters and ancient volcanic calderas. I'd think it's possible to get the two confused if enough time has passed, also due to the force of impact the two need not be mutually exclusive.
For one, calderas are usually "above" the nominal grade of the area (IOW built up by lava, ash over time).

Impact craters are "below" nominal grade of the area.

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12-20-2012, 08:48 PM
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I didn't realize that a massive lake flood was ever a possibility.

I always thought it was more like 'Hey the Colorado River is old a **** and look what it made over millions of years.'

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12-23-2012, 11:56 PM
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Originally Posted by LadyStanley View Post
For one, calderas are usually "above" the nominal grade of the area (IOW built up by lava, ash over time).

Impact craters are "below" nominal grade of the area.
don't the larger calderas(read: supersized) tend to collapse occasionally?I guess maybe not as much as I'd thought they might....or it could depend on how much eruption actually happened at that one point and whether there was a secondary eruption down the line somewhere....

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12-24-2012, 01:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zytz View Post
I didn't realize that a massive lake flood was ever a possibility.

I always thought it was more like 'Hey the Colorado River is old a **** and look what it made over millions of years.'
That's pretty much what I thought.

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