HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Business of Hockey
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Business of Hockey Discuss the financial and business aspects of the NHL. Topics may include the CBA, work stoppages, broadcast contracts, franchise sales, and NHL revenues.

LeBrun: NHL made new offer to NHLPA on Thursday (12/27)

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
01-03-2013, 09:11 AM
  #626
The Legend
Stamkos in 2016
 
The Legend's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,075
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLONG7 View Post
You may have missed the point here...
Please enlighten me. Original poster said that Bettman did a good job by putting teams in NT markets in order to grow the game.

I am saying he did a bad job - because it hasn't worked and has clearly cost the NHL in the long run.

Again though - please feel free to enlighten me

The Legend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:12 AM
  #627
Capsized
Parity is a Disease
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,858
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by lush View Post
This post is nothing more than a long complaint against parity using the team you're passionate about as an example as to why it doesn't work out for everyone. While the Redwings have presumably dropped down a notch there are a bunch of other teams that have gone up one.

These arguments always tend to hold more weight when discussed in a broader sense like how it impacts the quality of the game and viewership statistics for fans not loyal to a specific team.

Regardless of costs, when revenues go up it usually indicates positive things for a league as fans typically vote with their money
Or the league expanded and increased revenue sources.

Capsized is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:19 AM
  #628
Xref
Registered User
 
Xref's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 754
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Legend View Post
How long do you think we should keep this up before we judge it a failure?
Not much longer. Like I said, most Americans don't get hockey. Move the teams to Canada where they get it and appreciate it.

Xref is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:19 AM
  #629
tantalum
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Missouri
Posts: 10,438
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Legend View Post
Please enlighten me. Original poster said that Bettman did a good job by putting teams in NT markets in order to grow the game.

I am saying he did a bad job - because it hasn't worked and has clearly cost the NHL in the long run.

Again though - please feel free to enlighten me
Bettman put teams in:

Dallas....good success despite the last couple of years. That area has a nice hockey program now and is building a tradition. A little success again on the ice and ownership not handcuffed by cash flow issues and they will be a success again.

Columbus...some would argue this is a traditional market. Itis failing solely because the horrible horrible management the team and fans have had to endure.

Minnesota...success

Nashville...up in the air yet. Certainly not a failure

Atlanta...that was a failure, no question. But then again he's responsible for the Jets now. Win one lose one.

Phoenix..looks like a failure but I think there is equal fault of poor decisions in this franchise.

Carolina...seems to be doing fine and growing a tradition in the area.

Colorado...would say that has been a pretty successful franchise

Anaheim, Florida, Tampa were done before Bettman was commissioner. And of course expanding to non-traditional markets was what he was asked to do so he did it and he put them in the largest markets. Hard to fault him for that as it is what anybody would have done given that directive.

tantalum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:20 AM
  #630
Pilky01
@JamesD_TO
 
Pilky01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: London
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,182
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Legend View Post
Please enlighten me. Original poster said that Bettman did a good job by putting teams in NT markets in order to grow the game.

I am saying he did a bad job - because it hasn't worked and has clearly cost the NHL in the long run.

Again though - please feel free to enlighten me
It is similar to the HF obsession with draft picks and prospects.

Potential talent is overvalued just like potential profits are overvalued.

Pilky01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:21 AM
  #631
Capsized
Parity is a Disease
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,858
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by du5566 View Post
How is spreading out the talent to all 30 teams reducing the overall quality of the league? If 4-5 teams compete for and sign all the high end developed talent in the league how does that improve the overall quality?

I agree with the above poster in that you; like most anti cap posters, seem to be simply venting frustration in your favorite team’s current dry spell or mediocrity and channeling all that frustration into anti-cap (not being able to simply buy a good team) posts. It’s a selfish and narrow view of the issues at hand and the league as a whole.
If I was a fan of Florida then I guess I would have objective credibility. Instead I grew up watching hockey and therefore my observations are just sour grapes. Spreading the talent evenly is a recipe for mediocrity. Plain and simple. The Wings will continue to be competitive. How could they not? The entire league sucks now. The Wings have a great management staff. They will continue to be one of the best mediocre teams in the league but they will never again be great. Greatness is against the rules.


Last edited by Capsized: 01-03-2013 at 01:19 PM.
Capsized is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:25 AM
  #632
Icedog2735
Registered User
 
Icedog2735's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: New Haven, CT
Country: United States
Posts: 301
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xref View Post
Not much longer. Like I said, most Americans don't get hockey. Move the teams to Canada where they get it and appreciate it.
I think to say most Americans don't get hockey is very unfair. The problem is the American landscape is filled with professional sports options including NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, MLS, NASCAR, and also NCAA Football and Basketball all competing for the same dollars and unfortunately the NHL is far down on the list for the average American in cities like Phoenix, Miami, etc. I equate the failure of the NHL in select American markets more with if the NBA tried putting a team in say Edmonton or Winnipeg to "grow the game". Canadians get basketball but that doesn't necessarily mean they would pay to see it in their city 41 times a year.

Icedog2735 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:36 AM
  #633
Xref
Registered User
 
Xref's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 754
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icedog2735 View Post
I think to say most Americans don't get hockey is very unfair. The problem is the American landscape is filled with professional sports options including NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, MLS, NASCAR, and also NCAA Football and Basketball all competing for the same dollars and unfortunately the NHL is far down on the list for the average American in cities like Phoenix, Miami, etc. I equate the failure of the NHL in select American markets more with if the NBA tried putting a team in say Edmonton or Winnipeg to "grow the game". Canadians get basketball but that doesn't necessarily mean they would pay to see it in their city 41 times a year.
Hockey is far down on their list BECAUSE they don't get it. They don't get the feeling of excitement about the sport the way we do. Its just a simple fact that it's a regional sport, much the way NASCAR is. The NHL is TRYING to make inroads into other states to try to expand the brand. I applaud them for the effort, while others bash them. To each their own.

Xref is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:37 AM
  #634
The Legend
Stamkos in 2016
 
The Legend's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,075
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by tantalum View Post
Bettman put teams in:

Dallas....good success despite the last couple of years. That area has a nice hockey program now and is building a tradition. A little success again on the ice and ownership not handcuffed by cash flow issues and they will be a success again.

Columbus...some would argue this is a traditional market. Itis failing solely because the horrible horrible management the team and fans have had to endure.

Minnesota...success

Nashville...up in the air yet. Certainly not a failure

Atlanta...that was a failure, no question. But then again he's responsible for the Jets now. Win one lose one.

Phoenix..looks like a failure but I think there is equal fault of poor decisions in this franchise.

Carolina...seems to be doing fine and growing a tradition in the area.

Colorado...would say that has been a pretty successful franchise

Anaheim, Florida, Tampa were done before Bettman was commissioner. And of course expanding to non-traditional markets was what he was asked to do so he did it and he put them in the largest markets. Hard to fault him for that as it is what anybody would have done given that directive.

Any franchise that relocated I would remove from Bettman's ledger. I don't actually fault him for Canadian franchises that moved to the States - obviously the exchange rate was a gigantic influence that he had no control over (nor any expectation that it would reverse course).

I do blame him for putting teams in markets that had failed before (Atlanta) and were small with no real understanding of hockey (Nashville). His most egregious failure in my eyes has been his quicksand approach to failing American markets - if he had the same swift response that he had with Quebec/Winnipeg, the NHL wouldn't be in its current predicament.

The real reason he won't leave those markets is because the NHL already has gotten taxpayer dollars to build their arenas - the last thing Gary wants to do is set a precedent of leaving after bilking communities out of their money.

The Legend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:47 AM
  #635
Dojji*
Fight the Hate
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 16,821
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xref View Post
Hockey is far down on their list BECAUSE they don't get it.
Not quite.

Hockey is far down on the list because Americans haven't been sold on it. That's a slightly different point from the one you're making, because the solution is not to give up on the United States. It's to find new ways to sell the sport to undecided Americans.

The NHL needs to be out there promoting hockey in nontrad markets. If the only markets that are thriving are trad markets where no sell job really needs to be made, then your marketing sucks and it's time for a new strategy.

Dojji* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:51 AM
  #636
du5566*
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Boston
Country: United States
Posts: 2,471
vCash: 500
It's one thing to say that the salary cap and expansion has ruined the NHL and watered down the talent level in the NHL. It's quite another to provide factual evidence to support that argument. Especially when the fact remains that expansion and the salary capped system have lead to record revenues, TV ratings, and a national TV deal.

It's funny because I deal with the same crap in the NFL with fans of the Cowboys, Giants and 49ers. Venting about the good old days when their teams where dominant and thinking that the salary cap has ruined it.

du5566* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:53 AM
  #637
Xref
Registered User
 
Xref's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 754
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dojji View Post
Not quite.

Hockey is far down on the list because Americans haven't been sold on it. That's a slightly different point from the one you're making, because the solution is not to give up on the United States. It's to find new ways to sell the sport to undecided Americans.

The NHL needs to be out there promoting hockey in nontrad markets. If the only markets that are thriving are trad markets where no sell job really needs to be made, then your marketing sucks and it's time for a new strategy.
And you're not going to sell a product unless it's there and available to potential fans. The Thrashers were in Atlanta and available to fans there. The NHL marketed the living daylights out of them there. The NHL put the All-Star Game festivities there. Nothing worked. That market rejected hockey. Why? They just didn't "get it". They get high school and college football, but not hockey.

Xref is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:53 AM
  #638
Dojji*
Fight the Hate
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 16,821
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Legend View Post
Any franchise that relocated I would remove from Bettman's ledger. I don't actually fault him for Canadian franchises that moved to the States - obviously the exchange rate was a gigantic influence that he had no control over (nor any expectation that it would reverse course).

I do blame him for putting teams in markets that had failed before (Atlanta) and were small with no real understanding of hockey (Nashville).
I do not understand the hate on people have for Nashville in Canada. Atlanta I get. Phoenix I get. Nashville? To put it bluntly, what the ****? That market is doing OK. In fact of the Southern markets, in the last few years Nashville has been one of the Southern teams that clearly "gets it" and has developed some idea of how to compete for entertainment dollars in their market.
Quote:
His most egregious failure in my eyes has been his quicksand approach to failing American markets - if he had the same swift response that he had with Quebec/Winnipeg, the NHL wouldn't be in its current predicament.
Are you actually trying to convince me that the Commissioner is directly in charge of where a franchise moves to and when? If he had that much power, the NHL would still be in Atlanta -- and I think you get that. Ownership moved the Nords and the Jets. Bettman may have engineered WHERE they moved to a certain extent because of his power to approve the sale, but he actually didn't have a lot of control over the fact that they were on the go. No more than he had in Atlanta. That part of the decision is made largely at the ownership level, not at the Commissioner level.

Quote:
The real reason he won't leave those markets is because the NHL already has gotten taxpayer dollars to build their arenas - the last thing Gary wants to do is set a precedent of leaving after bilking communities out of their money.
This is a factor. Also, without a buyer, moving the team anywhere as the NHL isn't likely because the league would have to pay the penalty for breaking the lease out of their general fund. For as long as Jamison continues to flirt with buying the Yotes, they will be in Phoenix.

Dojji* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 09:58 AM
  #639
du5566*
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Boston
Country: United States
Posts: 2,471
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xref View Post
And you're not going to sell a product unless it's there and available to potential fans. The Thrashers were in Atlanta and available to fans there. The NHL marketed the living daylights out of them there. The NHL put the All-Star Game festivities there. Nothing worked. That market rejected hockey. Why? They just didn't "get it".
Haha, the Atlanta sport market is awful. The Falcons, Braves and Hawks all struggle to keep support no matter how good they are. But then again I am sure you know that because you clearly "get it."

The NHL took a risk by putting a franchise in a none traditional hockey market but it was a risk worth taking because Atlanta is one of the biggest TV markets in North America. It didn't work out but it was not because Americans don't get hockey. It's because Atlanta is and always has been one of the worst cities in America for fan support.

du5566* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:03 AM
  #640
Dojji*
Fight the Hate
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 16,821
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xref View Post
And you're not going to sell a product unless it's there and available to potential fans. The Thrashers were in Atlanta and available to fans there. The NHL marketed the living daylights out of them there. The NHL put the All-Star Game festivities there. Nothing worked. That market rejected hockey. Why? They just didn't "get it".
I'm not convinced that the specific issues surrounding the Thrashers make it a good example. The Atlanta Flames are one thing. The Thrashers I'm not really convinced needed to move, except that ASG didn't want them playing in their venue and wouldn't sell them to anyone else to play at that venue either. That was a decision made at the ownership level and not a decision that reflected the interest level of Atlanta fans.

And again, the All Star game is nice, but quite frankly, if you're trying to sell hockey by showcasing the mess our All Star Game has become, that's another example of how your strategy is not working. That is nowhere near good hockey, and showcasing individual stars in a town that has no idea who they are isn't going to change anyone's mind.

The solution to show people that hockey is worth watching, is to show people good hockey. Find ways to get eyeballs to the NHL in markets you want to penetrate. If that means allowing certain games to be broadcast free in select markets, then do it. Growing youth hockey in nontrad markets aggressively, sponsoring leagues, donating equipment, community outreach, these are things the franchises should already be doing, but if the NHL helps by duplicating the effort, that's going to strengthen your hold on the market.

Hockey won out in Canada because dedicated men did that stuff over a period of several decades. The South isn't that interested because the same groundwork was never laid there. And it won't ever get laid if you don't start the process somewhere. That means teams in their cities and as aggressive an outreach into those markets as you can manage at both the local and the leaguewide level Leaving teams to sink or swim on their own implies that "sink" is an option, which is the wrong way to go about making a new market your own.

Dojji* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:03 AM
  #641
The Legend
Stamkos in 2016
 
The Legend's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,075
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by du5566 View Post
It's one thing to say that the salary cap and expansion has ruined the NHL and watered down the talent level in the NHL. It's quite another to provide factual evidence to support that argument. Especially when the fact remains that expansion and the salary capped system have lead to record revenues, TV ratings, and a national TV deal.

It's funny because I deal with the same crap in the NFL with fans of the Cowboys, Giants and 49ers. Venting about the good old days when their teams where dominant and thinking that the salary cap has ruined it.
As I'm sure many others will point out, you can't have it both ways if you're Pro-owner; either the NHL is at a high point because of record revenues, or the league is failing because expenses are too high in relation to revenues.

The Legend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:06 AM
  #642
Dojji*
Fight the Hate
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 16,821
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by du5566 View Post
Haha, the Atlanta sport market is awful. The Falcons, Braves and Hawks all struggle to keep support no matter how good they are. But then again I am sure you know that because you clearly "get it."

The NHL took a risk by putting a franchise in a none traditional hockey market but it was a risk worth taking because Atlanta is one of the biggest TV markets in North America. It didn't work out but it was not because Americans don't get hockey. It's because Atlanta is and always has been one of the worst cities in America for fan support.
Exactly. The reason you put a team in Atlanta has nothing to do with fan support per se. It's a high roll to catch the eye of the American national media. What portion of our national media does not reside in NY and LA, pretty much resides in Atlanta. A Thrashers team that was at least as successful as Nashville or Carolina would have been a big step in getting their attention, which would only help when the time comes to cement another national media deal.

Dojji* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:07 AM
  #643
Dojji*
Fight the Hate
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 16,821
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Legend View Post
As I'm sure many others will point out, you can't have it both ways if you're Pro-owner; either the NHL is at a high point because of record revenues, or the league is failing because expenses are too high in relation to revenues.
No, you can have it both ways. High revenues + high costs = high revenues but poor profits

Dojji* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:12 AM
  #644
Xref
Registered User
 
Xref's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 754
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dojji View Post
I'm not convinced that the specific issues surrounding the Thrashers make it a good example. The Atlanta Flames are one thing. The Thrashers I'm not really convinced needed to move, except that ASG didn't want them playing in their venue and wouldn't sell them to anyone else to play at that venue either. That was a decision made at the ownership level and not a decision that reflected the interest level of Atlanta fans.

And again, the All Star game is nice, but quite frankly, if you're trying to sell hockey by showcasing the mess our All Star Game has become, that's another example of how your strategy is not working. That is nowhere near good hockey, and showcasing individual stars in a town that has no idea who they are isn't going to change anyone's mind.

The solution to show people that hockey is worth watching, is to show people good hockey. Find ways to get eyeballs to the NHL in markets you want to penetrate. If that means allowing certain games to be broadcast free in select markets, then do it. Growing youth hockey in nontrad markets aggressively, sponsoring leagues, donating equipment, community outreach, these are things the franchises should already be doing, but if the NHL helps by duplicating the effort, that's going to strengthen your hold on the market.

Hockey won out in Canada because dedicated men did that stuff over a period of several decades. The South isn't that interested because the same groundwork was never laid there. And it won't ever get laid if you don't start the process somewhere. That means teams in their cities and as aggressive an outreach into those markets as you can manage at both the local and the leaguewide level Leaving teams to sink or swim on their own implies that "sink" is an option, which is the wrong way to go about making a new market your own.
The All-Star Game festivities is not a mess. It's a great opportunity for fans to meet players, coaches, GM's and Owners. It's NOT just about the game itself. the accessibility to people that make the sport what it is is what I'm talking about. The all-star game itself is the least attractive festivity of the 3 days, imo. The NHL did a lot in the local communities including promoting minor leagues and developmental leagues. It just didn't gain traction.

Xref is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:14 AM
  #645
Xref
Registered User
 
Xref's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 754
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by du5566 View Post
Haha, the Atlanta sport market is awful. The Falcons, Braves and Hawks all struggle to keep support no matter how good they are. But then again I am sure you know that because you clearly "get it."

The NHL took a risk by putting a franchise in a none traditional hockey market but it was a risk worth taking because Atlanta is one of the biggest TV markets in North America. It didn't work out but it was not because Americans don't get hockey. It's because Atlanta is and always has been one of the worst cities in America for fan support.
[Mod...]

So what is it about people in Atlanta that make them poor fans of sports? Is it something in the water? The air? Explain.


Last edited by Killion: 01-03-2013 at 10:31 AM. Reason: not seeing it... dont go there.
Xref is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:17 AM
  #646
thom
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 2,194
vCash: 500
Good point about making inroads to usa its a process it might take 25 yrs to make a dent.But it has a long way the example I would give is this mornings Junior game where USA smashed Canada 5 to 1 Its front page material and its mentioned near the top in every news break in canada with a pop of 34 million people in the usa there is a good chance it will no be mentioned once among the media.

thom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:24 AM
  #647
du5566*
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Boston
Country: United States
Posts: 2,471
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Legend View Post
As I'm sure many others will point out, you can't have it both ways if you're Pro-owner; either the NHL is at a high point because of record revenues, or the league is failing because expenses are too high in relation to revenues.
Record revenues and TV ratings for the NHL show that the league is growing but are not yet at the level to support a deal where the players receive 57 percent of the revenue. I am pointing out the revenue and growth a sign of positive movement but that doesn't mean that the league is in good financial standing. From my perspective any reasonable person could indeed "have it both ways."


Last edited by du5566*: 01-03-2013 at 10:33 AM.
du5566* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:28 AM
  #648
awfulwaffle
Registered User
 
awfulwaffle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Country: United States
Posts: 6,921
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dojji View Post
Not quite.

Hockey is far down on the list because Americans haven't been sold on it. That's a slightly different point from the one you're making, because the solution is not to give up on the United States. It's to find new ways to sell the sport to undecided Americans.

The NHL needs to be out there promoting hockey in nontrad markets. If the only markets that are thriving are trad markets where no sell job really needs to be made, then your marketing sucks and it's time for a new strategy.
One thing I can tell you is my dad doesn't understand the rules and such, much like Soccer. It's a very simple concept(offsides), but after explaining it to him multiple times, he still doesn't understand it.

He keeps telling me how he would like the game more if there was no offsides, etc. Perhaps people have to grow up on it, compared to dive into it, like the Coyotes in Phoenix, how the team showed up and now those that were young that fell in love with the sport are going to be growing up and having jobs and able to buy their own tickets(like me).

But I also agree about the multiple sports fighting for money. This past year I've been to a Suns game, the Oregon/ASU game, the Buffalo Wild Wings bowl at Sun Devil Stadium, and now I'm going to the Fiesta bowl tonight.

There are a lot of options here in Phoenix outside of hockey.

awfulwaffle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:29 AM
  #649
du5566*
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Boston
Country: United States
Posts: 2,471
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xref View Post
There is no need to be condescending.

So what is it about people in Atlanta that make them poor fans of sports? Is it something in the water? The air? Explain.
I am sure the amount of transplants play a factor as many big American companies call Atlanta home. I am not really sure though but it's always been that way even going back to the early 90's when the Braves dominated baseball. Poor fan support has just always been a factor in Atlanta.

Another factor maybe be SEC football and NASCAR. As Georgia is right in the heart of SEC and NACAR country and sports fans in the area LOVE NASCAR and college football.

du5566* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2013, 10:32 AM
  #650
Dojji*
Fight the Hate
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 16,821
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xref View Post
There is no need to be condescending.

So what is it about people in Atlanta that make them poor fans of sports? Is it something in the water? The air? Explain.
I think it's a combination of a lack of any real history (if I recall correctly, there were no Atlanta franchises until the Braves moved there from Milwaukee), a lack of any particularly interesting rivalries, and a complete absence of sports tradition.

If you can't build a rivalry with a nearby market, it's hard to start buidling a tradition that's interesting enough to draw eyes and ears. The Canes and Lightning needed to bite the bullet and start building some serious hate with Atlanta. It would have been better for both clubs.

The fact that one of the more successful neighboring teams is in an entirely different conference (Nashville) didn't help here.

Dojji* is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:46 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.