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switching to defense

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Old
01-09-2013, 09:03 PM
  #1
cbjbluejackets61
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switching to defense

so i normally play right/left wind when i played in high school and inter murals, but i'm being switched to defense because of a lack of defenders.

whatre some tips and tricks to playing?

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01-09-2013, 10:19 PM
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Phil Connors*
 
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When I switched from offense to defense the first thing I learned was to remember that I was the last line of defense (no one is behind me to stop them from getting to the net). On offense you try to stick handle around people and lose the puck, you have your defense to stop them. On defense you try that and it's a breakaway or odd man rush etc. It's a lot more detrimental to turn the puck over on defense as it is on offense. So keep it simple. This kinda goes under the category of pinching. You better be sure that you are getting the puck if your pinching.

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01-09-2013, 10:24 PM
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7even
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Always be aware of your defense partner. You guys are basically mirror images of each other as far as 80% of your positioning is concerned. One of you should always be in front of your net in your defensive zone watching for the cross crease pass and generally getting in front of and harassing any opposing forwards. If he/she pinches in the offensive zone, you drop back, and vice versa.

Stay on your side. If the puck is in your corner, you're in the corner and your partner is in front of the net. If the puck moves to the other side, your partner's in the corner and you're in front of the net. Same in the offensive zone. You own half the ice and your partner's got the other.

Gap control, gap control, gap control. When an opposing forward is coming down on you on the rush, you want to keep him no more than a stick length away from you. There's basically two tricks to making positioning easy here 1) always be between the puck carrier and the net. Always. 2) Your outside shoulder (your shoulder further from the net) should always be lined up with the chest of the puck carrier coming down. Keep those two in mind and you'll never be out of position off the rush

Never underestimate the awesomeness of laying down on the ice to block a pass on a 2-on-1. It's just plain fun and makes you look like a badass when it works

All I can think of off the top of my head :shrug:

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01-09-2013, 10:50 PM
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hyster110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 7even View Post
Always be aware of your defense partner. You guys are basically mirror images of each other as far as 80% of your positioning is concerned. One of you should always be in front of your net in your defensive zone watching for the cross crease pass and generally getting in front of and harassing any opposing forwards. If he/she pinches in the offensive zone, you drop back, and vice versa.

Stay on your side. If the puck is in your corner, you're in the corner and your partner is in front of the net. If the puck moves to the other side, your partner's in the corner and you're in front of the net. Same in the offensive zone. You own half the ice and your partner's got the other.

Gap control, gap control, gap control. When an opposing forward is coming down on you on the rush, you want to keep him no more than a stick length away from you. There's basically two tricks to making positioning easy here 1) always be between the puck carrier and the net. Always. 2) Your outside shoulder (your shoulder further from the net) should always be lined up with the chest of the puck carrier coming down. Keep those two in mind and you'll never be out of position off the rush

Never underestimate the awesomeness of laying down on the ice to block a pass on a 2-on-1. It's just plain fun and makes you look like a badass when it works

All I can think of off the top of my head :shrug:
to this point, be adaptable as situations may dictate a switch, for example if your shadowing the puck carrier around the net, stay with him. dont leave him alone and hope your partner pics him up


also never underestimate the usefulness of the d to d pass. be open for one and be ready

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01-09-2013, 11:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hyster110 View Post
to this point, be adaptable as situations may dictate a switch, for example if your shadowing the puck carrier around the net, stay with him. dont leave him alone and hope your partner pics him up


also never underestimate the usefulness of the d to d pass. be open for one and be ready
To my credit I did say 80% of your positioning, not 100%

Good call on the D to D, definitely underused in the lower tiers.

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01-10-2013, 07:42 AM
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Another thing, learn how to read plays as they unfold. A lot of people think D-men aren't as good as forwards, where it's actually quite the opposite. D-men need to be able to read plays, act on it, and start plays.

Learning to read a play takes time, but it's useful.

Also, try to figure out what type of D-man you are. I made the switch, and it took me a while to figure out that I wasn't an offensive D, but a power D. Experiment and adjust your game slowly.

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01-10-2013, 08:04 AM
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Lonny Bohonos
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I played defense last year for the first time and wish I would have played when I was younger. Its different thats for sure.

I find D a lot more about positioning. Not that forward isnt but theres much less flexibility.

The thing I struggle with is backing in too much. On wing you dont have the same restrictions as much but on D its easy to play too cautious all the way to your crease. lol

D to D passes is another thing and on that note always make sure when you dont have the puck you get open as an outlet for your partner.

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01-10-2013, 12:38 PM
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Used to play D as a kid. Took time off, now I'm a goalie.

As a goalie, getting scored on is going to happen, even with the best of D in front of me. What really irks me is watching defenceman make a bonehead play then casually skate back instead of busting ass to try and rectify their mistake.
Don't ever stop trying.

Also, be very careful if you try and get a stick on the puck that's being shot at the net. Most of the time we can see it and are making our save selection based off of it's trajectory. I've had quite a few goals tipped in by my own defenceman because they weren't fully thinking.

Once you get possession of the puck in your own end, your first job is to make sure it gets out of the zone safely and quickly. Don't try and skate it up yourself unless you are completely sure it's getting out.

Keep your head on a swivel. Goalies will try to notify you when there's an attacker being unchecked, but don't get lost by fixating on the puck.

It's a very positional position. Keep shooters to the outside, don't screen your goalie (try not to at least) and make sure that the front of the net is clear.

As well, as much as it's glorious to get the slapshot goal from the blueline, you'll find more success shooting lower and hoping for a rebound or tip in from the wingers. '

It's a support position. First and foremost.

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01-10-2013, 04:38 PM
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After joining my Beer League team a couple of years ago, I was always put on D. I've played winger exclusively before the Beer League. The advice given here is excellent, but I definitely find the Gap Control to be the hardest as your backwards skating needs to be excellent. It's hard to maintain that 1 stick length away once they enter your defensive zone. My backward skating acceleration and top speed is probably too slow. Hence, I tend to backing in way too far and basically giving the opposing forward lots of room to skate into my zone to compensate. I'm more of a stay at home Defenceman now, as i don't have a booming point shot. Awesome position though.

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01-11-2013, 01:04 AM
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cbjbluejackets61
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thanks guys! appreciate all the help!

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01-13-2013, 02:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReaallMunson18 View Post
When I switched from offense to defense the first thing I learned was to remember that I was the last line of defense (no one is behind me to stop them from getting to the net). On offense you try to stick handle around people and lose the puck, you have your defense to stop them. On defense you try that and it's a breakaway or odd man rush etc. It's a lot more detrimental to turn the puck over on defense as it is on offense. So keep it simple. This kinda goes under the category of pinching. You better be sure that you are getting the puck if your pinching.
I would also say one thing I had to be aware of when I was switching from wing to D was that you really need to be aware of the middle of the ice. You obviously don't want to be cleanly beaten wide by the puck carrier, but it's usually much worse if you let someone beat you to the inside. It's actually probably ideal to bait him to go wide but make sure that you're in position to keep him to the outside.

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01-13-2013, 10:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taunting canadian View Post
I would also say one thing I had to be aware of when I was switching from wing to D was that you really need to be aware of the middle of the ice. You obviously don't want to be cleanly beaten wide by the puck carrier, but it's usually much worse if you let someone beat you to the inside. It's actually probably ideal to bait him to go wide but make sure that you're in position to keep him to the outside.
Really important point. Always force the puck carrier wide and work hard to keep him from skating around you to the front of the net.

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01-13-2013, 10:35 AM
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When someone is barring down on you and they've got the puck make sure you keep your eyes on their chest and play the body. Don't shy away from guys in the corner, and when you're the D-man that's supposed to be watching the net, don't go off chasing the puck. Move the guys out of your goalies way, don't just stand their tangled up with him because then we get double-screened. Good luck at your transition man.

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01-13-2013, 10:51 AM
  #14
tarheelhockey
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I'd say the toughest part of playing D happens in the transition from offense to defense.

You absolutely cannot get caught staring at a turnover. Forwards can get away with that because the play is usually up-ice and away from them. At D, no matter where the turnover happens, you need to react immediately or you're toast. There's nothing worse than the feeling of taking a split-second too long, losing a step on the opponent, and watching him coast in on your goalie alone. Even worse if your guy is the trailer and he puts home an easy tap-in after your partner and goalie stop the first guy.

For the first little while, you might want to play it safe and hang back just a little while you sharpen your sense of anticipation and work on your transition skating.

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Old
01-13-2013, 01:11 PM
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Leo Trollmarov
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Haven't read the other posts, but for me the biggest thing to being a successful dman is keep your stick active. When they come down on you all it takes is a well time swoop of the stick and the play is over. Also keep your body between the player and the net, make them skate the long way around you, or shot past you.

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