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No Salary Cap Increase Next Season????

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Old
11-09-2014, 04:47 PM
  #1
The Blue Line 81
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No Salary Cap Increase Next Season????

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nhl-pu...154942492.html


Quote:
Like the price of stamps, the NHLís salary cap ceiling seemed destined to grow forever higher.

So what happens if it doesnít rise next season?

Well, Larry Brooks of the NY Post reports that NHL GMs are preparing for that very thing, as the Canadian dollarís decline impacts the cap. He said at least three contract extensions have been affected by the notion that next yearís cap might be stagnant....

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Old
11-09-2014, 04:50 PM
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One Seabrook or Sharp please and thank you. This is really good news for us.

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Old
11-09-2014, 05:11 PM
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PWJunior
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I love this news, Snow's handling of the salary cap is ideal and we're in position to take advantage of it yet again. The Boychuk and Leddy deals were perfect examples of being wise with cap management.

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11-09-2014, 05:33 PM
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A Pointed Stick
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That would be a significant development. Is there anyone in here with their finger on the pulse of the Canadian economy who could expand on this a bit? I assumed the oil shales alone would have them floating in economic bliss for a long time.

Is this because US fracking has killed the market? Then why is my gas still over $3 a gallon?

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11-09-2014, 06:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Pointed Stick View Post
That would be a significant development. Is there anyone in here with their finger on the pulse of the Canadian economy who could expand on this a bit? I assumed the oil shales alone would have them floating in economic bliss for a long time.

Is this because US fracking has killed the market? Then why is my gas still over $3 a gallon?
The poster Freudian put it like this:

One of the main factors in the past for pushing the cap up, beside the rise in HRR, was NHLPA choosing to use the 5% cap escalator. This increases the cap but also escrow. Last year was the first time I can remember them not doing it and from the Brooks article it sounds like they might not want to do it again. Players under contract prefer lower escrow over having more cap space available for players not under contract.


Post #45

http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...1769595&page=2

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Old
11-09-2014, 07:26 PM
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Originally Posted by A Pointed Stick View Post
That would be a significant development. Is there anyone in here with their finger on the pulse of the Canadian economy who could expand on this a bit? I assumed the oil shales alone would have them floating in economic bliss for a long time.
Canada didn't suffer as hard a recession as the US in 2008 so when the US dollar took a dive the Canadian dollar was on par with it. Now that the US is out of a recession(Mod edit) the dollar going back to more common levels.


Last edited by The Blue Line 81: 11-09-2014 at 11:11 PM. Reason: leave the politics out of it please.
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Old
11-11-2014, 02:02 PM
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Garth may be in perfect shape to take advantage again.

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Old
11-11-2014, 02:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Pointed Stick View Post
That would be a significant development. Is there anyone in here with their finger on the pulse of the Canadian economy who could expand on this a bit? I assumed the oil shales alone would have them floating in economic bliss for a long time.

Is this because US fracking has killed the market? Then why is my gas still over $3 a gallon?
Having a cheap currency is not a reflection of your economy. Chinese Yuan (albeit a controlled currency) is very cheap (to encourage export) and China's economy remains strong.

Having an inexpensive currency is not necessarily a bad thing for your economy. I'm sure someone else here is a bit more experienced in macroeconomics than I am and can really clarify the point in a way that exceeds my limited abilities.

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11-11-2014, 02:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BroadwayJay View Post
Having a cheap currency is not a reflection of your economy. Chinese Yuan (albeit a controlled currency) is very cheap (to encourage export) and China's economy remains strong.

Having an inexpensive currency is not necessarily a bad thing for your economy. I'm sure someone else here is a bit more experienced in macroeconomics than I am and can really clarify the point in a way that exceeds my limited abilities.
you hit the nail on the head....

cheaper local currency makes your goods more attractive because it is cheaper for the importers to pay....though, it truly is dependent on the price of the currency relative to the US dollar, being that almost every single global trade gets paid for in USD

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11-11-2014, 02:19 PM
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you hit the nail on the head....

cheaper local currency makes your goods more attractive because it is cheaper for the importers to pay....though, it truly is dependent on the price of the currency relative to the US dollar, being that almost every single global trade gets paid for in USD
I think that is what complicates matters well beyond my limited understanding. I know that oil is traded in dollars, which is of IMMENSE importance to our currency; but irrelevant to Canadian currency. My understanding is that sometimes changes in our currency could have no impact on Canada, but have a powerful impact on the value of USD to CAD but have no simple explanation that relates to the Canadian economy in any way.

I'm really no expert, I just know the cursory stuff.

I know a lot more about "black market pesos" and other illegal currency/money laundering stuff. As a result I've learned a tiny bit about legitimate currency issues lol. Plus, my wife works in finance.

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11-11-2014, 02:20 PM
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I will just add that no salary cap increase would be an enormous coup for the Islanders and particularly with resigning efforts for Jonny Rockets, among other factors.

Great news for Isles fans, if it remains true.

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11-11-2014, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by BroadwayJay View Post
I know a lot more about "black market pesos" and other illegal currency/money laundering stuff. As a result I've learned a tiny bit about legitimate currency issues lol. Plus, my wife works in finance.
AND you cook & distribute meth on the side.

Dont you, Walter...

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11-11-2014, 02:35 PM
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AND you cook & distribute meth on the side.

Dont you, Walter...
LOL I don't have enough real estate for that unfortunately.

No, I had a case with that stuff and I got up to speed pretty quick. That's how it works, I learn about the processes when I get a relevant case.

You wouldn't believe how well-versed I am in no-fault insurance.

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11-11-2014, 03:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Pointed Stick View Post
That would be a significant development. Is there anyone in here with their finger on the pulse of the Canadian economy who could expand on this a bit? I assumed the oil shales alone would have them floating in economic bliss for a long time.

Is this because US fracking has killed the market? Then why is my gas still over $3 a gallon?
Oil prices are down, Canada is huge exporter. Retail prices are lagging.

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11-11-2014, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by xECK29x View Post
One Seabrook or Sharp please and thank you. This is really good news for us.
Very good news for the isles. Increases the chances the isles can keep Boychuk on an extension.

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11-11-2014, 04:07 PM
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Typically a low Canadian dollar in comparison with other countries means that Canada can pay its own employees less, but hire a lot more employees. This is because when you have a cheap dollar other countries will want lots of your product because it is a cheap product in comparison to the product of other countries. When you sell lots of product you need to hire more employees. However, because you are selling more products in the world market as opposed to the local market you have more competition and need to drop prices and thus employee wages. It thus leads to lower unemployment but lower wages/employee. So yeah, depends on one's outlook on what makes for a strong economy.

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11-11-2014, 04:17 PM
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A Pointed Stick
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Very interesting stuff folks! Thanks for answering my questions.

I think you answered my questions.

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Old
11-12-2014, 12:00 PM
  #18
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Gimme dat top line winger.

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Old
11-12-2014, 03:02 PM
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The glut in oil right now is definitely a part of it. It's not just our increased output, the Saudi's are flushing the market to gain market share and there's just not as much world wide demand. Canada is one of the few developed countries in the world that is affected by falling crude prices. it makes up 20% of their total exports.

One other thing that is not so visable right now that's affecting the Canadian economy is the slowdown in China. Essentially growth in China for the last 8-10 years has been fueled by construction, it literally makes up about 40% of their GDP. Canada was a big supplier of raw materials fueling China's construction boom.

On the surface, things don't look good for the Canadian dollar for the next few years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by A Pointed Stick View Post
That would be a significant development. Is there anyone in here with their finger on the pulse of the Canadian economy who could expand on this a bit? I assumed the oil shales alone would have them floating in economic bliss for a long time.

Is this because US fracking has killed the market? Then why is my gas still over $3 a gallon?

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Old
11-12-2014, 03:07 PM
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I wouldn't be so sure the Chinese economy is strong. For starters, they completely lie about GDP figures. It's the only country in the world that can tell you their GDP figures on Jan. 1st of said year In addition the construction boom is coming to an end. That has really accounted for most of their growth for a long time now and they are trying to convert their economy to more consumption based as opposed to investment. That is a tricky thing and certainly will not happen overnight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BroadwayJay View Post
Having a cheap currency is not a reflection of your economy. Chinese Yuan (albeit a controlled currency) is very cheap (to encourage export) and China's economy remains strong.

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