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The Canucks system

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01-29-2013, 03:31 PM
  #1
Lowkey
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The Canucks system

We have heard it time and time again when new players come to the team they talk about their being a transition period to learn the system. This seems like an appropriate topic since Jason Garrison is currently struggling to make a seamless transition to the team.

What makes the Canucks system different? If some of the more astute posters are willing to detail a typical or base NHL system and compare it to what the Canucks are doing that would be great! I'd love to learn more about the x's and o's and positioning of certain players when the puck is in position A, B, C etc.

My limited understanding of what makes it tough for new dmen is that when the puck is in their end the dmen are asked / required to be able to pass the puck up the ice to the forwards rather than skate it out. Occasionally they hang on to the puck a little bit longer in order to make a play rather than bang it off the boards or glass. In the offensive end I assume the dmen are required to make a lot of quick reads on when to pinch as our defenseman are frequently pinching down the boards to maximize our zone time and pin the other team deep in their own end. I love that Gillis and his staff have focused on identifying and acquiring the type of players with the appropriate skill set to execute this style of play from the back end. Tanev, Schultz, Corrado, McNally, Garrison all come to mind.

This would also be a good place to post your thoughts on what could be done from an x's and o's stand point to get the struggling power play going. Clearly they have been unable to get Garrison loose for one timers which is part of the problem. There has also been less quality chances and zone time overall which i would attribute to a little bit of rust since the twins didn't play during the lockout.


Last edited by Lowkey: 01-29-2013 at 03:37 PM.
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01-29-2013, 03:38 PM
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wahoyaho
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Something to do with getting stuck at our own zone all the time?

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01-29-2013, 04:01 PM
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Lowkey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wahoyaho View Post
Something to do with getting stuck at our own zone all the time?
You forgot to include the obvious bring back Ehrhoff to fix the power play.

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01-29-2013, 04:04 PM
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PRNuck
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From what I can tell, they just tell the players to "stick to the process", and then rely on superior talent levels to win games. The coaches operate with an appropriate degree of condescension, that prevents anyone from being willing to ask the question "what exactly is the process?" I think that may be why Keith Ballard is in the doghouse, doesn't he seem like the kind of guy who would ask?

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01-29-2013, 04:06 PM
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Scurr
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Originally Posted by wahoyaho View Post
Something to do with getting stuck at our own zone all the time?
The way we play in our own end lends itself to giving up zone time to bigger teams. We play a passive man to man defence until someone is able to free up the puck and then we outman it with good puck support to get it out. Teams that protect the puck well can have it in our zone a lot but usually on the outside where they aren't dangerous. At least when we're playing well.

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01-29-2013, 04:11 PM
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Scurr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PRNuck View Post
From what I can tell, they just tell the players to "stick to the process", and then rely on superior talent levels to win games. The coaches operate with an appropriate degree of condescension, that prevents anyone from being willing to ask the question "what exactly is the process?" I think that may be why Keith Ballard is in the doghouse, doesn't he seem like the kind of guy who would ask?
"the process" is something you can learn about in most sports psychology books. Focusing on results can lead to wild swings of emotion based on things that are largely out of your control. Focusing on the process keeps your head in the right place and is going to have you ready to play more times than not.

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01-29-2013, 04:16 PM
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PRNuck
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Originally Posted by Scurr View Post
"the process" is something you can learn about in most sports psychology books. Focusing on results can lead to wild swings of emotion based on things that are largely out of your control. Focusing on the process keeps your head in the right place and is going to have you ready to play more times than not.
I honestly had no idea that's what he was talking about. Thanks for that. Most nights, I still think I'd prefer them to actually get fired up and give a **** about something.

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01-29-2013, 04:31 PM
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Alflives
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Originally Posted by Lowkey View Post
We have heard it time and time again when new players come to the team they talk about their being a transition period to learn the system. This seems like an appropriate topic since Jason Garrison is currently struggling to make a seamless transition to the team.

.
I'll bite,

Coach V. requires three parts of the game for his D that would be a change for some players.

1. Gap play in the neutral zone (between the blue lines). With Loose pucks or while in control of the puck, the off-side D from the puck must move his feet and get behind (on the lateral plane) his partner. This creates a stagger for multi-level defense and allows the partner (if he gets the puck from the forwards) to make a cross-ice pass that is not straight across the ice, but rather it goes somewhat backwards. (This is the Edler turn-over against SJ. His partner, Garrison, was level on the ice with Edler making any pass more easy to intercept. Garrison needed to be deeper. Then, once the puck is moved to this deeper partner the passer must read the postioning of the forechecking forewards, and his own forwards (center and winger on his side of the ice). After this read that defense-man must either back up to recieve another cross-ice pass (back from his partner) or move forward into space to support the play as the puck moves up the ice. All this requires a lot of thinking. This thinking is most likely part of the reason why Garrison appears to be behind the play.

2. Take hits from forechecking forwards. Coach V requires all his D to take hits in the corners on dump-ins. This frees up the puck for either the D's partner or a back-checking forward (usually the center). Again this requires reading the forecheck and thinking where the puck should be layed (not passed) considering the positioning of your partner, your backchecking forward, and the attacking players too. (The goalie is a huge help here, letting his D know which way to lay the puck.) Did you see the hit Tanev took during the SJ game to make this very play? It's a tough play to make, but it's the one his coach demands. That's why Tanev is liked so much by coach V.

3. The "pinch" in the attacking zone. Coach V allows his D to pinch along the boards in the offensive zone, but this again requires thinking. The D must read his forwards and the other team's forwards positions on the ice before he moves up the boards. Plus, his partner must make a read too. He must decide to move back to the center ice dot (he does this when he thinks his pinching partner has made a bad read.) or to support his partner's decision by moving further away inside the blue-line to accept a full cross ice pass from the supporting forward.

The thinking (processing) of information for the D is huge.

These are three systems I notice that coach V requires from his defense-men that are somewhat different than other teams. #2 is why the Canucks go through so many D during the season, and in the play-offs.

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