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2010 Census data released (UPD 2013)

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Old
03-08-2011, 05:57 PM
  #1
LadyStanley
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2010 Census data released (UPD 2013)

http://www.dof.ca.gov/research/demog..._2010/view.php

Here's the California data.

For those looking for references on population of cities/regions in the US when talking about hockey future locations.....


http://2010.census.gov/2010census/data/

Full US data

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03-08-2011, 06:28 PM
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BTW, for those who may ask, Canada's is a 2011 census on may 10th. Population data will be available in Feb 2012.

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03-08-2011, 07:05 PM
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25% growth in arizona?

hmm......

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03-08-2011, 11:15 PM
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Nevada up 35.1%

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03-08-2011, 11:20 PM
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The South went 14.3% up. That being more than any other region.
2nd being the west at 13.8%,

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03-09-2011, 02:17 PM
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State Data:
State2010 Population2000 Population% Change# NHL teams # NBA teams #MLB Teams # NFL Teams #MLS teams
California37 253 95633 871 6489.99%34533
Texas25 145 56120 851 82020.59%13222
New York19 378 10218 976 4572.12%32**23**1**
Florida18 801 31015 982 37817.64%22230
Illinois12 830 63212 419 2933.31%11211
Pennsylvania12 702 37912 281 0543.43%21221
Ohio11 536 50411 353 1401.62%11221
Michigan9 883 6409 938 444-0.55%11110
Georgia9 687 6538 186 45318.34%01110
North Carolina9 535 4838 049 31318.46%11010
New Jersey8 791 8948 414 3504.49%12**2**2**1**
Virginia8 001 0247 078 51513.03%1*1*1*1*1*
Washington6 724 5405 894 12114.09%00111
Massachusetts6 547 6296 349 0973.13%11111
Indiana6 483 8026 080 4856.63%01010
Arizona6 392 0175 130 63224.59%11110
Tennessee6 346 1055 689 28311.54%11010
Missouri5 988 9275 595 2117.04%10221*
Maryland5 773 5525 296 4869.01%1*1*2*2*1*
Wisconsin5 686 9865 363 6756.03%01110
Minnesota5 303 9254 919 4797.81%11110
Colorado5 029 1964 301 26116.92%11111
Alabama4 779 7364 447 1007.48%00000
South Carolina4 625 3644 012 01215.29%00000
Louisiana4 533 3724 468 9761.44%01010
Kentucky4 339 3674 041 7697.36%00000
Oregon3 831 0743 421 39911.97%01001
Oklahoma3 751 3513 450 6548.71%01000
Puerto Rico3 725 7893 808 610-2.17%00000
Connecticut3 574 0973 405 5654.95%00000
Iowa3 046 3552 926 3244.10%00000
Mississippi2 967 2972 844 6584.31%00000
Arkansas2 915 9182 673 4009.07%00000
Kansas2 853 1182 688 4186.13%001*1*1*
Utah2 763 8852 233 16923.77%01001
Nevada2 700 5511 998 25735.15%00000
New Mexico2 059 1791 819 04613.20%00000
West Virginia1 852 9941 808 3442.47%00000
Nebraska1 826 3411 711 2636.72%00000
Idaho1 567 5821 293 95321.15%00000
Hawaii1 360 3011 211 53712.28%00000
Maine1 328 3611 274 9234.19%00000
New Hampshire1 316 4701 235 7866.53%00000
Rhode Island1 052 5671 048 3190.41%00000
Montana 989 415 902 1959.67%00000
Delaware 900 877 783 60014.97%00000
South Dakota 814 180 754 8447.86%00000
Alaska 710 231 626 93213.29%00000
North Dakota 672 591 642 2004.73%00000
Vermont 625 741 608 8272.78%00000
Washington D.C. 601 723 572 0595.19%1*1*1*1*1*
Wyoming 563 626 493 78214.14%00000
*For the purposes of this chart, DC area teams are counted once in each of virginia, maryland, and DC. Similarly, KC teams are double counted in Kansas and Missouri.
**NYC baseball, football, and basketball teams are doublecounted in NY and NJ. Only the devils are counted for the NHL.

observations:

-Texas appears to be underserved. Houston is often thrown around as a potential NHL location, and this shows why.
-Washington is a large, growing state with no NHL team. Once city data is available, seattle's rank vs other metropolitan areas or combined statistical areas will clarify if the NHL should make it a priority.
-If the coyotes were to move, arizona would likely represent one of the top potential markets for the NHL.

City Data:
I included the top 51, because rochester and albany are essentially equivalent, though both are likely irrelevant to any discussion here.
*The panthers were counted as miami. Yeah... i know, but it makes the most sense. Also of note, the green bay packers are not represented on this list, for obvious reasons.
City* Census 2010* Census 2000* Growth %* # NHL teams* # NBA teams* # MLB teams* # NFL teams* # MLS teams*
New York, NY-NJ-CT-PA (CSA) 22,232,494 21,361,797 4.08% 3 2 2 2 1
Los Angeles, CA (CSA) 17,820,893 16,373,645 8.84% 2 2 2 2
Chicago, IL-IN-WI (CSA) 9,804,845 9,312,255 5.29% 1 1 2 1 1
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (CSA) 8,440,617 7,572,647 11.46% 1 1 2 2 1
Boston, MA-RI-NH (CSA) 7,609,358 7,298,695 4.26% 1 1 1 1 1
San Francisco, CA (CSA) 7,427,757 7,092,596 4.73% 1 1 2 2 1
Dallas, TX (CSA) 6,805,275 5,487,956 24.00% 1 1 1 1 1
Philadelphia, PA-NJ-DE-MD (CSA) 6,533,122 6,207,223 5.25% 1 1 1 1 1
Houston, TX (CSA) 5,968,586 4,815,122 23.96% 1 1 1 1
Atlanta, GA-AL (CSA) 5,831,778 4,548,344 28.22% 1 1 1
Miami, FL (MSA) 5,547,051 5,007,564 10.77% 1 1 1 1
Detroit, MI (CSA) 5,327,764 5,357,538 -0.56% 1 1 1 1
Phoenix, AZ (MSA) 4,364,094 3,251,876 34.20% 1 1 1 1
Seattle, WA (CSA) 4,158,293 3,707,144 12.17% 1 1 1
Minneapolis, MN-WI (CSA) 3,604,460 3,271,888 10.16% 1 1 1 1
Denver, CO (CSA) 3,110,436 2,629,980 18.27% 1 1 1 1 1
San Diego, CA (MSA) 3,053,793 2,813,833 8.53% 1 1
St. Louis, MO-IL (CSA) 2,892,874 2,754,328 5.03% 1 1 1
Cleveland, OH (CSA) 2,891,988 2,945,831 -1.83% 1 1 1
Orlando, FL (CSA) 2,747,614 2,191,081 25.40% 1
Tampa, FL (MSA) 2,747,272 2,395,997 14.66% 1 1 1
Pittsburgh, PA (CSA) 2,445,117 2,525,730 -3.19% 1 1 1
Sacramento, CA-NV (CSA) 2,436,109 2,069,298 17.73% 1
Charlotte, NC-SC (CSA) 2,389,763 1,897,034 25.97% 1 1
Portland, OR-WA (MSA) 2,241,841 1,927,881 16.29% 1 1
Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN (CSA) 2,214,954 2,050,175 8.04% 1 1
Kansas City, MO-KS (CSA) 2,136,653 1,901,070 12.39% 1 1 1
San Antonio, TX (MSA) 2,072,128 1,711,703 21.06% 1
Indianapolis, IN (CSA) 2,064,870 1,843,588 12.00% 1 1
Columbus, OH (CSA) 2,031,229 1,835,189 10.68% 1 1
Las Vegas, NV (CSA) 1,947,068 1,408,250 38.26%
Milwaukee, WI (CSA) 1,760,268 1,689,572 4.18% 1 1
Austin, TX (CSA) 1,750,224 1,283,910 36.32%
Salt Lake City, UT (CSA) 1,743,364 1,469,474 18.64% 1 1
Raleigh, NC (CSA) 1,742,816 1,314,589 32.57% 1
Norfolk, VA-NC (MSA) 1,674,498 1,576,370 6.22%
Nashville, TN (CSA) 1,666,566 1,381,287 20.65% 1 1
Greensboro, NC (CSA) 1,581,122 1,414,656 11.77%
Louisville, KY-IN (CSA) 1,395,634 1,292,482 7.98%
Jacksonville, FL (MSA) 1,328,144 1,122,750 18.29% 1
Grand Rapids, MI (CSA) 1,327,366 1,254,661 5.79%
Hartford, CT (CSA) 1,313,516 1,257,709 4.44%
Memphis, TN-MS-AR (MSA) 1,304,926 1,205,204 8.27% 1
Oklahoma City, OK (CSA) 1,297,552 1,160,942 11.77% 1
Greenville, SC (CSA) 1,264,930 1,128,104 12.13%
Richmond, VA (MSA) 1,238,187 1,096,957 12.87%
New Orleans, LA (CSA) 1,235,650 1,360,436 -9.17% 1 1
Buffalo, NY (CSA) 1,203,493 1,254,066 -4.03% 1 1
Birmingham, AL (CSA) 1,212,848 1,129,721 7.36%
Albany, NY (CSA) 1,151,653 1,118,095 3.00%
Rochester, NY (CSA) 1,127,483 1,131,543 -0.36%

observations:

- my expectations from above seem to be correct. Houston and Seattle are the two largest unserved markets for the NHL.
- if phoenix were indeed abandoned, it would join that group.
- 5 of the top 51 cities are shrinking. NO gets a pass for obvious reasons. Cleveland isnt an NHL market, but in retrospect maybe a very good choice by the NHL on the cleveland/columbus question. The other 3, Detroit, Pittsburgh, and Buffalo, are core hockey markets. This may be a bit of a concern, but the hockey tradition in these cities combined with strong ownership (thanks pegula) should mitigate any fears of future nhl success.
- kansas city may seem low on this list, but look at the other cities above it (ignoring houston, seattle, and phoenix of course).
  • San Diego/Sacramento - do you really think cali can support more than 3 NHL teams?
  • Cleveland/Cincinnati/Charlotte - these states have recent relos/expansions, and while not doing too poorly, i'd have to think there is a reason the NHL chose columbus and raleigh over these markets - the obvious one being competition.
  • San Antonio - NBA competition for a city that size, NBA team that owns arena and AHL team, and there is a much better option for a 2nd team in texas.
- that leaves portland, which is probably a better hockey market than KC, but, as all portland convos go... Paul Allen.


Last edited by danishh: 10-20-2011 at 01:50 AM.
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Old
03-09-2011, 04:47 PM
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Jesus Danishh! Great Job

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03-09-2011, 06:09 PM
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Thought this article about the Ohio census data was interesting in terms of pro sports in Ohio and Columbus:

Quote:
Population drastically declines in Ohio cities

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Toledo, Youngstown, Dayton and Akron all suffered huge population declines from 2000 to 2010.

The sole exception to the declining fortunes of Ohio cities was Columbus. The state capital and home of Ohio State University grew 11% in the decade and is twice as big as Cleveland.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/...o-census_N.htm
From non-Ohioans I've talked to about who seem shocked/surprised/angry that Columbus has an NHL team, they tend to be unaware that Columbus is the largest city in Ohio and the only one that's really growing. Cincinnati and Cleveland (who no one questions having pro-sports franchises) are dying cities.

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03-09-2011, 06:27 PM
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This is strange! I had heard that NY State actually lost over 2 million people over the last 10-15 years, hence why they lost congressional seats in the recent past.

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03-09-2011, 06:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JacketsFanWest View Post
Thought this article about the Ohio census data was interesting in terms of pro sports in Ohio and Columbus:



From non-Ohioans I've talked to about who seem shocked/surprised/angry that Columbus has an NHL team, they tend to be unaware that Columbus is the largest city in Ohio and the only one that's really growing. Cincinnati and Cleveland (who no one questions having pro-sports franchises) are dying cities.
I think it will take some time for perception to catch up with reality. Cleveland and Cincinnati have been big league pro sports towns forever (the Reds and the Browns and Indians go back generations), and Columbus hasn't.

I know that I had always thought of Columbus as a small, college town, and was quite surprised the first time I learned that it was actually larger than either Cleveland or Cincinnati.

I think that the NHL was actually quite savvy in putting an expansion team in Columbus. Ohio is a big northern state, and it's a good idea to have a team there. And as stated, Cincy and Cleveland are shrinking and already saturated with pro-sports. Columbus is growing and has no other major pro sports competition, and only has to coexist with Ohio State football.

I don't know why people so vehemently deride the choice of Columbus. I think it was brilliant, and once the Jackets finally put some competitive seasons together, it will be a smashing success.

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03-09-2011, 06:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MayDay View Post
I think it will take some time for perception to catch up with reality. Cleveland and Cincinnati have been big league pro sports towns forever (the Reds and the Browns and Indians go back generations), and Columbus hasn't.

I know that I had always thought of Columbus as a small, college town, and was quite surprised the first time I learned that it was actually larger than either Cleveland or Cincinnati.

I think that the NHL was actually quite savvy in putting an expansion team in Columbus. Ohio is a big northern state, and it's a good idea to have a team there. And as stated, Cincy and Cleveland are shrinking and already saturated with pro-sports. Columbus is growing and has no other major pro sports competition, and only has to coexist with Ohio State football.

I don't know why people so vehemently deride the choice of Columbus. I think it was brilliant, and once the Jackets finally put some competitive seasons together, it will be a smashing success.
For starters, there is way more corporate support in Cinncinati.

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03-09-2011, 06:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaPride View Post
This is strange! I had heard that NY State actually lost over 2 million people over the last 10-15 years, hence why they lost congressional seats in the recent past.
New York State did lose millions of people, but gained slightly more than it lost because of immigration, mostly to the downstate region. Resulting in only a slight increase overall.

The state lost congressional seats because it did not grow nearly as fast as other states in the south and west.

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03-10-2011, 12:02 AM
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this is some scary shid.

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03-10-2011, 12:31 AM
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I'm curious to how cities such as Buffalo and Detroit fared? Not too well I presume?

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03-10-2011, 12:32 AM
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Quote:
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I'm curious to how cities such as Buffalo and Detroit fared? Not too well I presume?
Its bad bro... People are saying detroit is at 790k

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03-10-2011, 12:37 AM
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Iowa finally hit 3 million. Hope Nebraska hits 2 million by 2020.

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03-10-2011, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by htpwn View Post
I'm curious to how cities such as Buffalo and Detroit fared? Not too well I presume?
The Buffalo-Niagara Falls metropolitan area is down about 4% in the last decade, from about 1.17 million, to about 1.12 million.

Don't look at the city population itself, which is misleading. Most of the people in WNY (and most of the hockey fans, for that matter) now live in the suburbs. So you have to look at the metropolitan area.

A 4% drop is not-so-great, but it's much less of a loss than in previous decades. WNY's population decline may be bottoming-out.

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03-10-2011, 09:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MayDay View Post
The Buffalo-Niagara Falls metropolitan area is down about 4% in the last decade, from about 1.17 million, to about 1.12 million.

Don't look at the city population itself, which is misleading. Most of the people in WNY (and most of the hockey fans, for that matter) now live in the suburbs. So you have to look at the metropolitan area.

A 4% drop is not-so-great, but it's much less of a loss than in previous decades. WNY's population decline may be bottoming-out.
MayDay,

I am suprieed Buffalo has not dropped beyond 1 million yet. They seem to be holding out. Any reasons why?

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03-10-2011, 09:50 AM
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MayDay,

I am suprieed Buffalo has not dropped beyond 1 million yet. They seem to be holding out. Any reasons why?
The population within the city itself has shrunk a lot in past decades (from over 500K to under 300K).

But (as in many other American cities in the latter half of the 20th Century) much of that decline consisted of people simply moving a few miles away to the suburbs. Many of Buffalo's suburbs have seen considerable growth in recent decades.

Don't get me wrong, western NY as a whole has been hurt by continued economic stagnation and has shrunk in population. But oftentimes people only look at the city's population only, and get an exaggerated sense of that loss. That's misleading for the purposes of discussion on this board, since many hockey fans, and fans of other pro sports, are suburbanites. Need to look at the metropolitan area as a whole.

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03-10-2011, 10:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MayDay View Post
The population within the city itself has shrunk a lot in past decades (from over 500K to under 300K).

But (as in many other American cities in the latter half of the 20th Century) much of that decline consisted of people simply moving a few miles away to the suburbs. Many of Buffalo's suburbs have seen considerable growth in recent decades.

Don't get me wrong, western NY as a whole has been hurt by continued economic stagnation and has shrunk in population. But oftentimes people only look at the city's population only, and get an exaggerated sense of that loss. That's misleading for the purposes of discussion on this board, since many hockey fans, and fans of other pro sports, are suburbanites. Need to look at the metropolitan area as a whole.
Sprawl in Lockport and Orchard Park is awful. It's just odd to me because Places like Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Cincinnati have lost way more and even their suburbs are losing. What has Buffalo done in comparison to those areas?

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03-10-2011, 11:03 AM
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Sprawl in Lockport and Orchard Park is awful. It's just odd to me because Places like Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Cincinnati have lost way more and even their suburbs are losing. What has Buffalo done in comparison to those areas?
Nothing.

Places like Pittsburgh and Cleveland just started out with more people to lose.

The problem with Buffalo is that it still hasn't found some primary industry or economic activity to replace what was lost when the steel industry left town. It doesn't have to be manufacturing anymore, but it has to be something.

I think Buffalo really needs to take advantage of its geographic location, right on the border, and adjacent to the golden horseshoe, the major population center of Canada. Canada and the US are each other's largest trading partner, and Buffalo stands right at crossroads between major population centers in both countries. The city needs to somehow take advantage of its location better. Perhaps seek better integration into the golden horseshoe economy.

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03-10-2011, 12:34 PM
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If we take the December, 2010, Population estimates, the United States population was 309,183,463.

Now if we subtract out:
Hawaii 1,366,862
Alaska 721,523
Florida 18,900,773
Louisiana 4,553,962

We get:
309,183,463
-25,543,120
=283,640,343

283,640,000 (rounded off)

Next the October, 2010, Population estimates for Canada, 34,238,000.

And now:
34,238,000 divided by 283,640,000
= 0.12%

0.12% of 30 teams = 3.6 teams

** Subtracted out Hawaii, Alaska, Florida, and Louisiana just to accommodate the thinking that not all of the US would be appropriate for hockey.

Of course, Florida has two NHL teams, but one could argue that having the NHL in Florida is akin to having MLB in Alaska or the Yukon (if those places had cities the likes of those in Florida).

Sorry for this post, it's just something I had an idea to post the other day, and then this thread came along and it seemed as appropriate a place as any to put the post.

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03-10-2011, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MayDay View Post
I think it will take some time for perception to catch up with reality. Cleveland and Cincinnati have been big league pro sports towns forever (the Reds and the Browns and Indians go back generations), and Columbus hasn't.

I know that I had always thought of Columbus as a small, college town, and was quite surprised the first time I learned that it was actually larger than either Cleveland or Cincinnati.

I think that the NHL was actually quite savvy in putting an expansion team in Columbus. Ohio is a big northern state, and it's a good idea to have a team there. And as stated, Cincy and Cleveland are shrinking and already saturated with pro-sports. Columbus is growing and has no other major pro sports competition, and only has to coexist with Ohio State football.

I don't know why people so vehemently deride the choice of Columbus. I think it was brilliant, and once the Jackets finally put some competitive seasons together, it will be a smashing success.
Columbus is a great city, but it's still a medium sized market. The Cleveland and Cincy areas are still larger than Metro Columbus in total population. The main reason that Columbus as a city continues to grow is that they have annexed surrounding land. Instead of it being a suburban community, it counts as being in the city itself. By land size, Columbus is one of the largest cities in the U.S. but it has a very low density compared to most large American cities. What is normally considered the burbs in most cities, makes up much of Columbus.

And yes, while Cleveland itself is shrinking, the metro area is holding up decently. It's a matter of suburban flight like in most urban cities. Detroit and Pittsburgh are perfect examples of that. As you posted above, Metro populations are always the most accurate when it comes to a region's population.

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03-10-2011, 12:41 PM
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Colorado - 16.91% of 16.92% are Californians.

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03-10-2011, 04:48 PM
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Interesting that Michigan is the only state to be in decline, and a very small one at that.

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