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Feb 2013: Meteorite Explosion/Impact in Russia

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02-19-2013, 03:03 PM
  #51
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Reports now that the fragments left behind are about 125 time more valuable than gold per ounce. Scavengers will be all over the place.

A very large fragment or up to 3 chunks reportedly went into the lake and they will dive in the spring to find them. Could be worth tens or hundreds of millions.

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02-19-2013, 08:46 PM
  #52
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http://theweek.com/article/index/240...by-the-numbers

$2200 per ounce (estimated value of meteorite pieces) and other numbers from incident.

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03-30-2013, 06:34 PM
  #53
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http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/earth/meteor-strike.html

NOVA episode on Russian meteor strike

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04-05-2013, 01:29 PM
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So just a few comments to make after reading the thread.

Meteors aren't necessarily attracted to Russia. It's just that their land mass is the largest and has a populace that's more scattered across its land than say Canada, which itself is a massive area of land, but whose population is chiefly to the South. We simply don't have as many eyes out there to detect meteor strikes, relative to the eyes available in the more populace Russia.

Also, it's projected that most meteors that strike earth land in the oceans anyways, and since there are even less eyes out in the open oceans, we'll never really see these kinds of impacts out there.

Second...those that are saying that this was a 'small' meteor, are correct in that it's small relative to other ones, but still, the energy it was 'carrying' was equivalent to the nuclear bomb that exploded in Hiroshima or Nagasaki. Had that meteor exploded closer to the ground, instead of at a higher altitude, that city would have been flattened, instead of just having doors and windows broken in.

Main point is that even 'small' meteors can have a devastating impact if they explode close to the ground instead of dissipating their energy in higher altitudes explosions.

Also, we could detect smaller ones too, if NASA and other space agencies were funded more than the pittance they receive relative to their nation's overall budget. Shame on us for our whack priorities. Humans simply aren't evolved to think or plan for the future outside of their own immediate needs or their own immediate lifetimes. We're a species just waiting to go extinct because of this ineptitude.

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06-27-2013, 09:15 PM
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23066055

Shockwave from explosion traveled around the world twice.

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06-29-2013, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyStanley View Post
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23066055

Shockwave from explosion traveled around the world twice.
That's pretty intense.

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08-19-2013, 10:37 AM
  #57
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http://news.discovery.com/space/aste...mkcpgn=rssnws1

Quote:
Masked in the chaos, however, was an enormous plume of dust that the Russian meteor left behind in Earth's atmosphere. This cloud, which had hundreds of tons of material in it, was still lingering three months after the Feb. 15 explosion, a new study has found. Scientists created a video of the Russian meteor explosion's dust cloud to illustrate the phenomenon.
...
Initial measurements 3.5 hours after the meteor explosion showed the dust 25 miles (40 km) high in the atmosphere, speeding east at 190 mph (306 km/h).

Russian officials were still cleaning up in Chelyabinsk when, four days after the explosion, the higher portion of the plume reached all the way around Earth's northern hemisphere. Even three months into the study, Suomi still saw a "detectable belt" of dust circling the globe, researchers said.

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10-30-2013, 06:18 PM
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http://news.discovery.com/space/aste...mkcpgn=rssnws1

Quote:
It was on Feb. 15, 2013, that the infamous asteroid exploded in the air about 40 kilometers south-southwest the city of Chelyabinsk. The shock waves shattered windows far and wide, set off alarms, injured many people, but also provided a treasure trove of recorded digital video from security and dashboard cameras.

Combined with seismic, infrasound and satellite data, there was an unprecedented amount of information for researchers like Mark Boslough of Sandia National Laboratories. He and his colleagues used all that data to create a simulation of the event that matched the observations in order to flesh out the information about what happened. They presented their findings at the [Geological Society of America] meeting on Oct. 29.

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