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Are you all phonies / Help me watch the game better?

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Old
02-18-2013, 01:57 PM
  #1
PhillyPhinn
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Are you all phonies / Help me watch the game better?

How do you watch games?

I don't mean via which medium, but the way you follow the action on the ice. Before this season, the Flyers were the only team I knew the numbers, and relied mostly on the announcers for knowing who was on the ice for the opposing team. This year I have the players numbers on an excel sheet on my computer screen when watching games, and now know 100% of the numbers for about 10-12 teams, and know most of the numbers for another ten teams. It has made my watching experience much more fun, and I feel like I have a better feel for how individual players on other teams are doing....

My brain capacity may be low, but I still have found it hard to focus on both teams at the same time, and I usually focus on just one team. And it takes me several games to get a feel of how a team likes to match lines/change their strategies mid-game, and even though I know all the numbers, I don't get a feel for every player and their tendencies during the game.

That's why my question is: Could you guys really, without looking up stats/articles, give me a short scouting report for most of the leagues top 6 forwards / top 4 d-men, or are you all just talking out of your ass when you're comparing players to eachother on this forum and talking like you know everything about every player. Do you non-Jets fans, who don't specifically make a point of watching the Jets every night, have a good handle on how Burmistrov or Ron Hainsey has been playing. Or do you just rely on what other people are saying/stats, and then use other peoples opinions as your own.

I may just be dumb at hockey, even though I've played/watched it since I was 7. But if there really are people here who feel like they know every team/every player, please help me out in watching the game better.....

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02-18-2013, 02:09 PM
  #2
1rd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhillyPhinn View Post
How do you watch games?

I don't mean via which medium, but the way you follow the action on the ice. Before this season, the Flyers were the only team I knew the numbers, and relied mostly on the announcers for knowing who was on the ice for the opposing team. This year I have the players numbers on an excel sheet on my computer screen when watching games, and now know 100% of the numbers for about 10-12 teams, and know most of the numbers for another ten teams. It has made my watching experience much more fun, and I feel like I have a better feel for how individual players on other teams are doing....

My brain capacity may be low, but I still have found it hard to focus on both teams at the same time, and I usually focus on just one team. And it takes me several games to get a feel of how a team likes to match lines/change their strategies mid-game, and even though I know all the numbers, I don't get a feel for every player and their tendencies during the game.

That's why my question is: Could you guys really, without looking up stats/articles, give me a short scouting report for most of the leagues top 6 forwards / top 4 d-men, or are you all just talking out of your ass when you're comparing players to eachother on this forum and talking like you know everything about every player. Do you non-Jets fans, who don't specifically make a point of watching the Jets every night, have a good handle on how Burmistrov or Ron Hainsey has been playing. Or do you just rely on what other people are saying/stats, and then use other peoples opinions as your own.

I may just be dumb at hockey, even though I've played/watched it since I was 7. But if there really are people here who feel like they know every team/every player, please help me out in watching the game better.....
An accurate, objective scouting report of top 6 forwards / top 4 d-men? Not necessarily.
My opinion on a bunch of guys? Yes.

I do know/recognize a lot of the better known guys, but honestly.. I don't care enough to know who is holding the puck 24/7...
If & when I'm lying on my couch watching a game, I don't bother thinking THAT much. So thank goodness for announcers.

E: I'm talking about my non-favorite teams ofc.

EE: Hometeam fans see tons of their players but usually overrate them.
Others may criticize them unfairly. So 'njoy.


Last edited by piqued: 02-18-2013 at 03:24 PM. Reason: english only please
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02-18-2013, 02:10 PM
  #3
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there's more than a few people who have a good grasp on a lot teams around the league but most posters here are just homers that talk out of their *****

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02-18-2013, 02:25 PM
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Now that I have Gamecentre, I usually watch each game twice. The first time, just to watch/enjoy the game while it's on live, and the second to pay closer attention and try to catch more of the little things.

Also check out Jeremy Weiss' channel on YouTube. He's got lots of great videos where he takes footage from games and thoroughly dissects certain plays, and some other more basic stuff on systems, different types of forechecks, defensive zone coverage, etc. Personally I think it should be required viewing before you're allowed to post on HFB. It'd save us from a lot of pointless debates about the Devils being a 'trap team', etc.

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02-18-2013, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhillyPhinn View Post
How do you watch games?

I don't mean via which medium, but the way you follow the action on the ice. Before this season, the Flyers were the only team I knew the numbers, and relied mostly on the announcers for knowing who was on the ice for the opposing team. This year I have the players numbers on an excel sheet on my computer screen when watching games, and now know 100% of the numbers for about 10-12 teams, and know most of the numbers for another ten teams. It has made my watching experience much more fun, and I feel like I have a better feel for how individual players on other teams are doing....

My brain capacity may be low, but I still have found it hard to focus on both teams at the same time, and I usually focus on just one team. And it takes me several games to get a feel of how a team likes to match lines/change their strategies mid-game, and even though I know all the numbers, I don't get a feel for every player and their tendencies during the game.

That's why my question is: Could you guys really, without looking up stats/articles, give me a short scouting report for most of the leagues top 6 forwards / top 4 d-men, or are you all just talking out of your ass when you're comparing players to eachother on this forum and talking like you know everything about every player. Do you non-Jets fans, who don't specifically make a point of watching the Jets every night, have a good handle on how Burmistrov or Ron Hainsey has been playing. Or do you just rely on what other people are saying/stats, and then use other peoples opinions as your own.

I may just be dumb at hockey, even though I've played/watched it since I was 7. But if there really are people here who feel like they know every team/every player, please help me out in watching the game better.....
Stats don't tell the story for a lot of players. Sure, you can always see who puts up numbers, but in order to really get a feel for a player you have to watch them. This is especially true with defenseman and guys who don't light the lamp on a regular basis.

When I want to learn about a new player, mostly rookies, I'll watch them and almost only them during their shifts. Yakupov, Taresenko and Justin Schultz this year, Nugent-Hopkins, Landeskog last year etc. Almost every player in the league is good when the puck is on their stick, I like to see what they do without the puck. Its a pretty good indication of their hockey IQ which, IMO, is the most important asset a player can have. Also, watch their compete level - do they fight for loose pucks, do they win 1 on 1 battles, do they tie up a man on the backcheck? Are they looking for holes in the offensive zone and giving their teammates an outlet? When they get the puck are they reading the defense? When they get a opportunities and have time are they hitting the goalie in the crest or making him make a save? Little things like this, for me anyway, are pretty telling as to whether a young player will have success in the league.

I'm the biggest hockey nut I know and my finace will tell you a watch more hockey then what should be allowed, and even I don't know everyone in the league. Theres certain teams I watch more then others so I can give a pretty knowledgable opinion on most players on those teams, but theres also a few teams, mostly western, that I hardly watch at all unless they're playing a team I like.


Simply put, its hard to scout and watch the game at the same time. Watching the game as a whole will make certain players jump at you, but if you want to specifically target a player, its hard to watch the game. IMO anyway.

Hope that helps.

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Old
02-18-2013, 02:28 PM
  #6
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Hockey isn't rocket science. If you've played the game before its remarkably easy to keep up with whats going on and how to judge talent.

Its not the people who only watch one team who should worry you, its the people who have never played hockey giving an opinion on hockey that you should worry you.

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02-18-2013, 02:29 PM
  #7
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I just look at the colours. Life is too short to learn people's names.

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Old
02-18-2013, 02:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhillyPhinn View Post
How do you watch games?

I don't mean via which medium, but the way you follow the action on the ice. Before this season, the Flyers were the only team I knew the numbers, and relied mostly on the announcers for knowing who was on the ice for the opposing team. This year I have the players numbers on an excel sheet on my computer screen when watching games, and now know 100% of the numbers for about 10-12 teams, and know most of the numbers for another ten teams. It has made my watching experience much more fun, and I feel like I have a better feel for how individual players on other teams are doing....

My brain capacity may be low, but I still have found it hard to focus on both teams at the same time, and I usually focus on just one team. And it takes me several games to get a feel of how a team likes to match lines/change their strategies mid-game, and even though I know all the numbers, I don't get a feel for every player and their tendencies during the game.

That's why my question is: Could you guys really, without looking up stats/articles, give me a short scouting report for most of the leagues top 6 forwards / top 4 d-men, or are you all just talking out of your ass when you're comparing players to eachother on this forum and talking like you know everything about every player. Do you non-Jets fans, who don't specifically make a point of watching the Jets every night, have a good handle on how Burmistrov or Ron Hainsey has been playing. Or do you just rely on what other people are saying/stats, and then use other peoples opinions as your own.

I may just be dumb at hockey, even though I've played/watched it since I was 7. But if there really are people here who feel like they know every team/every player, please help me out in watching the game better.....
Move to Canada. Watch TSN and Sportsnet often, combine that with talking to strangers in bars and after a year you'll know everything there is to know.

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Old
02-18-2013, 02:37 PM
  #9
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I couldn't give an accurate report but I sure as hell could pretty accurately tell you their NHL13 overall.

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Old
02-18-2013, 02:38 PM
  #10
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Read more HFBoards. Seriously. You can get pretty good scouting reports from team forums.

But seriously, the best tip I can give is to watch more games not involving the team you follow. When I watch games that involve my team, I tend to focus too much on what they're doing rather than both sides. When you watch a game from a neutral standpoint it's easier to evaluate the game as a whole. I find myself analyzing the game better and learning more about players that way.

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02-18-2013, 02:48 PM
  #11
tarheelhockey
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Of course we use other people's opinions as our own. That's natural when dealing with close to 1000 players. Generally, though, there are about 200-300 players who are really relevant to the league and if you make a point to closely watch a handful of good ones in each game, plus knowing the players on your own team very well, you're going to pick up on the important players over the course of a few years. The day-to-day news and the churn of forgettable players becomes background noise to the most important players' long-term changes in role and ability.



Here's a suggestion for changing your perspective when watching a game:

1) First, stop watching the puck. Literally forget about it and ignore it completely.

2) Now, stop watching individual players. Let your eyes un-focus and view the two teams like schools of fish -- look at the team, not the players. By this time, you should be basically seeing two patterns interacting with each other. Roughly square-shaped, with the wingers and defensemen forming the corners and the center roaming around the middle.

3) Now, looking only at those patterns, try to pick out the moments when one pattern seems to get an advantage over the other. You'll spot moments when the defensive team starts fluttering around, confused and unable to hold a geometric shape. Note the reasons for that change -- is it that the forwards on the successful side were simply faster, or that they are physically overwhelming their opponents, or is it a case of one player making a dynamic move that threw everything into chaos? Are the defenders just standing around like statues, or are they moving too much?

4) Once you feel like you've got a handle on what's happening at the team level, THEN check which players were involved. There's a very good chance that by the end of the game, you'll have spotted the same players consistently doing the same things right, and the same players consistently doing the same things wrong.

5) At this point you can pretty much write up a scouting report about the strongest and weakest players from both teams, as well as those who made themselves irrelevant by failing to get involved in anything important.

It helps to be in the arena. TV is a terrible medium for judging these things, especially in transition. If you must watch on TV, it really helps to make liberal use of a DVR rewind button when you see something interesting happen. There's a very good chance that there were 2-3 players involved in making one player look good or bad.

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02-18-2013, 02:52 PM
  #12
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Here's something everyone should try at least once: Watch an entire game without focusing on the puck once in live action. Instead, concentrate on the flow of both five man units (or four man units as applicable) as they respond to each other and the situations that develop.

You'll notice a lot more about how the teams play in general, where things are going well and going wrong, and how individual players are playing. You'll never have a problem following the play because the actions of the players tells you exactly what's going on, and a poor individual play sticks out like a sore thumb when you see it in the context of how it adversely affects the flow of the unit as a whole. (Examples: How the defensive integrity of a unit collapses after someone blows an assignment in the defensive zone, or how a unit will be caught going the wrong way relative to the other team after a bad turnover in transition.)

Conversely, players that are doing their job appear to be moving in harmony with their teammates and the play always "flows" through them.

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02-18-2013, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tarheelhockey View Post
Of course we use other people's opinions as our own. That's natural when dealing with close to 1000 players. Generally, though, there are about 200-300 players who are really relevant to the league and if you make a point to closely watch a handful of good ones in each game, plus knowing the players on your own team very well, you're going to pick up on the important players over the course of a few years. The day-to-day news and the churn of forgettable players becomes background noise to the most important players' long-term changes in role and ability.



Here's a suggestion for changing your perspective when watching a game:

1) First, stop watching the puck. Literally forget about it and ignore it completely.

2) Now, stop watching individual players. Let your eyes un-focus and view the two teams like schools of fish -- look at the team, not the players. By this time, you should be basically seeing two patterns interacting with each other. Roughly square-shaped, with the wingers and defensemen forming the corners and the center roaming around the middle.

3) Now, looking only at those patterns, try to pick out the moments when one pattern seems to get an advantage over the other. You'll spot moments when the defensive team starts fluttering around, confused and unable to hold a geometric shape. Note the reasons for that change -- is it that the forwards on the successful side were simply faster, or that they are physically overwhelming their opponents, or is it a case of one player making a dynamic move that threw everything into chaos? Are the defenders just standing around like statues, or are they moving too much?

4) Once you feel like you've got a handle on what's happening at the team level, THEN check which players were involved. There's a very good chance that by the end of the game, you'll have spotted the same players consistently doing the same things right, and the same players consistently doing the same things wrong.

5) At this point you can pretty much write up a scouting report about the strongest and weakest players from both teams, as well as those who made themselves irrelevant by failing to get involved in anything important.

It helps to be in the arena. TV is a terrible medium for judging these things, especially in transition. If you must watch on TV, it really helps to make liberal use of a DVR rewind button when you see something interesting happen. There's a very good chance that there were 2-3 players involved in making one player look good or bad.
You beat me to it. I agree with this 100%. This is how hockey should be watched.

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02-18-2013, 03:00 PM
  #14
LSnow
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I watch all the teams in the league, some more some less. But i have some understanding of the players on those teams. I usually watch what they do shift by shift and base my subjective ranking on that.

But when i watch the Capitals i can only focus on them and think every team they face are amazing and Caps suck.

but i dont understand why would anyone try to remember players numbers, when you can tell who is who quite easily.

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02-18-2013, 03:06 PM
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tarheelhockey
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Originally Posted by EastonBlues22 View Post
You beat me to it. I agree with this 100%. This is how hockey should be watched.
But you said it in a lot fewer words

One other benefit of watching the game that way: you really see the secrets behind the success of the "somehow he's always near the puck" types. It almost always comes down to positioning and quickness.

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02-18-2013, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Plante View Post
Hockey isn't rocket science. If you've played the game before its remarkably easy to keep up with whats going on and how to judge talent.

Its not the people who only watch one team who should worry you, its the people who have never played hockey giving an opinion on hockey that you should worry you.
I agree with your point, and that point can be part of the issue: "Those who've played the game"

I seem to recall a thread on here a ways back talking about the game, and I lost count of how many people in that thread went one of two ways: "I've never played the game" or the other side" I can't believe how many people here haven't played hockey"

Honestly myself for example? I played about 3 years-my parents put me through between 6-9 years of age-other than road hockey the odd time, I've never played the game on ice since then. With me being past my 4th decade now, I myself find threads like this helpful-what to watch and HOW to watch.

I don't want to hazard a guess on here on how many people HAVE played hockey, but judging by the aforementioned thread, it wouldn't surprise me if a large number of people on HF boards were like me and only played a short while-if at all.

Thanks to you and everyone contributing to this thread though, it's helping me as well understand the game from different angles

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02-18-2013, 03:16 PM
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PhillyPhinn
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but i dont understand why would anyone try to remember players numbers, when you can tell who is who quite easily.
?? How do you tell who is who if not by the number? Yes, there are guys with distinct skating styles/helmets/size that you notice instantly. But I dare you to instantly spot the difference between let's say Da Costa and Condra on the Sens, without checking the number.

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02-18-2013, 03:19 PM
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Now that I have Gamecentre, I usually watch each game twice. The first time, just to watch/enjoy the game while it's on live, and the second to pay closer attention and try to catch more of the little things.
This has been a God send, (gift from my Mom <3) I'm able to rewind, watch plays in slow motion and catch out of market teams that I didn't previously get a chance to watch much.

Quote:
Also check out Jeremy Weiss' channel on YouTube. He's got lots of great videos where he takes footage from games and thoroughly dissects certain plays, and some other more basic stuff on systems, different types of forechecks, defensive zone coverage, etc. Personally I think it should be required viewing before you're allowed to post on HFB. It'd save us from a lot of pointless debates about the Devils being a 'trap team', etc.
Thanks for the heads up, you can never have too much hockey knowledge.

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02-18-2013, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by tarheelhockey View Post
Of course we use other people's opinions as our own. That's natural when dealing with close to 1000 players. Generally, though, there are about 200-300 players who are really relevant to the league and if you make a point to closely watch a handful of good ones in each game, plus knowing the players on your own team very well, you're going to pick up on the important players over the course of a few years. The day-to-day news and the churn of forgettable players becomes background noise to the most important players' long-term changes in role and ability.



Here's a suggestion for changing your perspective when watching a game:

1) First, stop watching the puck. Literally forget about it and ignore it completely.

2) Now, stop watching individual players. Let your eyes un-focus and view the two teams like schools of fish -- look at the team, not the players. By this time, you should be basically seeing two patterns interacting with each other. Roughly square-shaped, with the wingers and defensemen forming the corners and the center roaming around the middle.

3) Now, looking only at those patterns, try to pick out the moments when one pattern seems to get an advantage over the other. You'll spot moments when the defensive team starts fluttering around, confused and unable to hold a geometric shape. Note the reasons for that change -- is it that the forwards on the successful side were simply faster, or that they are physically overwhelming their opponents, or is it a case of one player making a dynamic move that threw everything into chaos? Are the defenders just standing around like statues, or are they moving too much?

4) Once you feel like you've got a handle on what's happening at the team level, THEN check which players were involved. There's a very good chance that by the end of the game, you'll have spotted the same players consistently doing the same things right, and the same players consistently doing the same things wrong.

5) At this point you can pretty much write up a scouting report about the strongest and weakest players from both teams, as well as those who made themselves irrelevant by failing to get involved in anything important.

It helps to be in the arena. TV is a terrible medium for judging these things, especially in transition. If you must watch on TV, it really helps to make liberal use of a DVR rewind button when you see something interesting happen. There's a very good chance that there were 2-3 players involved in making one player look good or bad.




I came to post some advice I'd heard once, "If your watching the puck, your missing the game."

Not only have you covered that in point #1, you have expanded on it significantly. That advice should be handed to every new fan of hockey, and many old fans as well.

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02-18-2013, 03:39 PM
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Top 6 Forwards: Crosby, Malikin, Giroux, D. Sedin, H. Sedin, Stamkos

Top 4 Defensemen: Karlsson (Probably top 3 players before injury) Weber, Chara, Suter

Crosby is just a dominant player all around. Great vision, hands, skating. Full meal deal. More a passer than shooter, but not by much.

Malkin is the exact same as Crosby with a deadly shot.

Giroux is a great playmaking center who can pot good goal when he decides to shot a puck. Which he hasn't done much of this year. Also lacking due to loss of Jagr.

D. Sedin/H. Sedin are two of the smartest, most hard working players in the league. Being twins helps them a lot. They have amazing vision, and ability to physically with stand any defensemen in the NHL. They take the cycle game to a whole new level. Daniel is the better one at shooting and Henrik is the genius passer. He scores occasionally as well, like last night...I still dont think he meant it.

Stamkos is in my opinion the best shot in the NHL and easiest superstar to defend on paper. He has the fastest release in the NHL and has the ability to get open to get his shot off.

Any of those Top 6 are guys you'd want to build a team around, and they all have.

Erik Karlsson is truly something special. He has amazing vision, he is the most powerful skater in his position and has a deadly shot. He is essentially a forward who plays defense. Yet he also plays that part of his game very well. Go back and watch some of the Sens games before his injury and watch how he controlled play whenever he was on the ice

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02-18-2013, 03:58 PM
  #21
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Originally Posted by tarheelhockey View Post
But you said it in a lot fewer words

One other benefit of watching the game that way: you really see the secrets behind the success of the "somehow he's always near the puck" types. It almost always comes down to positioning and quickness.
Stop making me like you, ya friggin Cane fan! And you've almost run me over in the post count. Glad you're around, most of the time. Lol

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02-18-2013, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by malcolmedge View Post
Top 6 Forwards: Crosby, Malikin, Giroux, D. Sedin, H. Sedin, Stamkos

Top 4 Defensemen: Karlsson (Probably top 3 players before injury) Weber, Chara, Suter

Crosby is just a dominant player all around. Great vision, hands, skating. Full meal deal. More a passer than shooter, but not by much.

Malkin is the exact same as Crosby with a deadly shot.

Giroux is a great playmaking center who can pot good goal when he decides to shot a puck. Which he hasn't done much of this year. Also lacking due to loss of Jagr.

D. Sedin/H. Sedin are two of the smartest, most hard working players in the league. Being twins helps them a lot. They have amazing vision, and ability to physically with stand any defensemen in the NHL. They take the cycle game to a whole new level. Daniel is the better one at shooting and Henrik is the genius passer. He scores occasionally as well, like last night...I still dont think he meant it.

Stamkos is in my opinion the best shot in the NHL and easiest superstar to defend on paper. He has the fastest release in the NHL and has the ability to get open to get his shot off.

Any of those Top 6 are guys you'd want to build a team around, and they all have.

Erik Karlsson is truly something special. He has amazing vision, he is the most powerful skater in his position and has a deadly shot. He is essentially a forward who plays defense. Yet he also plays that part of his game very well. Go back and watch some of the Sens games before his injury and watch how he controlled play whenever he was on the ice
Code:
If serious = True Then

    Top 6 Forward = Top 6 Forward for each team
    Top 4 Defenseman = Top 4 Defenseman for each team

Else

    LOL

End If

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02-18-2013, 04:16 PM
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malcolmedge View Post
Top 6 Forwards: Crosby, Malikin, Giroux, D. Sedin, H. Sedin, Stamkos

Top 4 Defensemen: Karlsson (Probably top 3 players before injury) Weber, Chara, Suter

Crosby is just a dominant player all around. Great vision, hands, skating. Full meal deal. More a passer than shooter, but not by much.

Malkin is the exact same as Crosby with a deadly shot.

Giroux is a great playmaking center who can pot good goal when he decides to shot a puck. Which he hasn't done much of this year. Also lacking due to loss of Jagr.

D. Sedin/H. Sedin are two of the smartest, most hard working players in the league. Being twins helps them a lot. They have amazing vision, and ability to physically with stand any defensemen in the NHL. They take the cycle game to a whole new level. Daniel is the better one at shooting and Henrik is the genius passer. He scores occasionally as well, like last night...I still dont think he meant it.

Stamkos is in my opinion the best shot in the NHL and easiest superstar to defend on paper. He has the fastest release in the NHL and has the ability to get open to get his shot off.

Any of those Top 6 are guys you'd want to build a team around, and they all have.

Erik Karlsson is truly something special. He has amazing vision, he is the most powerful skater in his position and has a deadly shot. He is essentially a forward who plays defense. Yet he also plays that part of his game very well. Go back and watch some of the Sens games before his injury and watch how he controlled play whenever he was on the ice
There are three better players then Karlsson listed above. Crosby needs no explanation nor does Malkin the two most dominate players. Stamkos is the best goal scorer in the NHL. There are a few goalies also that would be a more important part to a team also. This is a case of Karlsson being over valued.

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02-18-2013, 04:47 PM
  #24
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I learn any names/numbers I don't pick up from watching when I play NHL 12. As for my opinion of players the majority of games I watch are Habs games on RDS (I don't speak french) so I get to make my own opinions on most players and teams. I have french/common sense to be able to read pretty much anything they put on the screen but I don't listen to the play by play guys unless I am just listening for a name because I can't see the number. Though by now with most Montreal players I can tell who it is without seeing their number just by their build and how they skate.

I agree with the people that say don't watch the puck too. It is way more satisfying to know when the play is going to develop rather than watch it on the replay after.


Last edited by Prairie Habs: 02-18-2013 at 04:57 PM.
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02-18-2013, 04:53 PM
  #25
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It's been stated already but it really, really helps to be at the arena. I particularly like my view from the upper bowl near the top. I do puck watch quite often but on the rush especially I'll check out the other forwards and see how the play's developing and what kind of setup I can expect. On a goal mouth scramble I often end up just staring at the net to see if it goes in. If it gets frozen I'll hear the whistle, and if the puck moves away from the net the mass of bodies will kind of disperse and I'll notice that out of the corner of my eye.

Also since becoming an official myself I sometimes watch a referee or linesman skate up and down the rink for a bit. I actually missed seeing a goal go in once because I was staring at the trailing referee.

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