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Favourite Decade for Music?

View Poll Results: What is your favourite decade for music?
2010's 2 1.60%
2000's 12 9.60%
1990's 53 42.40%
1980's 12 9.60%
1970's 31 24.80%
1960's 13 10.40%
1950's 1 0.80%
Other 1 0.80%
Voters: 125. You may not vote on this poll

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Old
03-03-2013, 07:39 PM
  #76
White Plains Batman
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Originally Posted by Acadmus View Post
Spoken like someone who thinks history started in 1990

Seriously, every decade had it's highly inspirational problems. The Cold War and fears of nuclear annihilation was a backdrop for every decade from the 1950s until the end of the 80s, for instance. Civil Rights marches, Cuban Missile Crisis, assassinations of JFK, RFK, and MLK, and the Vietnam war in the 60s. Terrorism, Vietnam, Russian invasion of Afghanistan, oil embargoes, economic stagnation and inflation (a.k.a. stagflation), the Iranian Revolution and embassy hostages in the 70s...fears that the Soviets would launch missiles, the explosion of the Challenger, invasion of Grenada, famine in Ethiopia, increased manufacturing competition from Japan and the sunsetting of a number of American industries, the fall of the Iron Curtain...serial killers throughout each decade...all sorts of troubles that can inspire singers from all walks of life. The 90s had no monopoly on it, and I say that as someone who voted for the 90s as my favorite decade.

Oh, and AIDS became a mainstream problem in the 80s after Rock Hudson died from it. Magic Johnson brought it to the forefront again after several years, but it was a boy named Ryan White that was the poster boy for "everyone can get it" - he died after contracting HIV through a blood transfusion. Johnson was predictable because he was promiscuous. But it was Rock Hudson's death in the early 80s that shocked everyone.

Dude, sure there was plenty of history before. I grew up in the 80s. I just gave my opinion on maybe why so many people like the 90s music more than 80s and one of the many reasons why I think the early 90s had some explosive music. Better recording and production quality help also.

Nothing touches the 70s regardless and the mid-late 60s was probably the most explosive political time for music.

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03-03-2013, 07:46 PM
  #77
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Originally Posted by White Plains Batman View Post
Dude, sure there was plenty of history before. I grew up in the 80s. I just gave my opinion on maybe why so many people like the 90s music more than 80s and one of the many reasons why I think the early 90s had some explosive music. Better recording and production quality help also.

Nothing touches the 70s regardless and the mid-late 60s was probably the most explosive political time for music.
I'm the worst type of person...... I instantly thought of Kennedy, and yes, in that way.

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03-03-2013, 07:54 PM
  #78
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90's
00's
80's
70's

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03-04-2013, 09:03 AM
  #79
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Originally Posted by White Plains Batman View Post
Dude, sure there was plenty of history before. I grew up in the 80s. I just gave my opinion on maybe why so many people like the 90s music more than 80s and one of the many reasons why I think the early 90s had some explosive music. Better recording and production quality help also.

Nothing touches the 70s regardless and the mid-late 60s was probably the most explosive political time for music.
Sorry, it sounded like you were saying the 90s was the most influential because of events

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03-04-2013, 09:52 AM
  #80
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The 90s were great because no matter what kind of music you liked there was something great. Rock, rap, pop, dance, R&B, country, all of it was popular at the time and there were a lot of great artists putting out music.

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03-04-2013, 03:11 PM
  #81
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Originally Posted by WhipNash27 View Post
The 90s were great because no matter what kind of music you liked there was something great. Rock, rap, pop, dance, R&B, country, all of it was popular at the time and there were a lot of great artists putting out music.
I'd vote for the 90's if it was possible to limit it to the early part of the decade. From around 94/95 the boy/girl band craze started and the rest of the decade went straight to the toilet after that. The hideous Euro dance/pop... Oddly enough, the quality of music somehow coincides with MTV Europe splitting up from one single channel into regional versions.

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03-04-2013, 04:27 PM
  #82
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Originally Posted by WhipNash27 View Post
The 90s were great because no matter what kind of music you liked there was something great. Rock, rap, pop, dance, R&B, country, all of it was popular at the time and there were a lot of great artists putting out music.
I agree, but I think this contributed more to it being a high-quantity decade rather than a high quality one (in comparison to the others, I mean). As solid and diverse as it was, the way I see it, there were only a handful of timeless albums comparable to stuff like Loveless and OK Computer, whereas in the 70s there were dozens of timeless classics.

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03-04-2013, 09:45 PM
  #83
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And a new day will dawn for those who stand long

And the forests will echo with laughter




Does anyone remember laughter?

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03-04-2013, 10:26 PM
  #84
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And a new day will dawn for those who stand long

And the forests will echo with laughter




Does anyone remember laughter?
One of my favourite live performances ever.

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03-05-2013, 03:39 PM
  #85
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90's for rock and rap music. Music sucks these days unless its underground or indie.

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03-05-2013, 05:02 PM
  #86
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Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
I'd vote for the 90's if it was possible to limit it to the early part of the decade. From around 94/95 the boy/girl band craze started and the rest of the decade went straight to the toilet after that. The hideous Euro dance/pop... Oddly enough, the quality of music somehow coincides with MTV Europe splitting up from one single channel into regional versions.
For me it was the reggae/ska/snotty punk sound that was starting to take over the alternative rock channels in '96 that turned me off...I was ignoring the pop music that was dominated by divas (male and female) in the beginning of the 90s and morphed into the pure pop of Brittany Spears and the Spice Girls by the end of the 90s (but not before '97).

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03-05-2013, 08:52 PM
  #87
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I just realized that Joy Division was late 70s and not early 80s.

I no longer think it's remotely close. 1970s!

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03-06-2013, 03:37 AM
  #88
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I just realized that Joy Division was late 70s and not early 80s.

I no longer think it's remotely close. 1970s!
Closer was their most successful album - it was released in June of 1980.

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03-06-2013, 06:10 AM
  #89
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Originally Posted by WhipNash27 View Post
The 90s were great because no matter what kind of music you liked there was something great. Rock, rap, pop, dance, R&B, country, all of it was popular at the time and there were a lot of great artists putting out music.
See, this is exactly why I think the 90s is the objective right answer. Sure everyone has their preferences, and that's totally fine, but in terms of including as many music genres as possible, it's gotta be the 90s. Rap and Country were either non-existent or sucked before 1990. Rap in the 90s was phenomenal with Tupac, Notorious BIG, Puff, Snoop, Dre, Beastie Boys, Bone, and even early Eminem (among others). Then in Country you had Garth, Tim McGraw, Faith Hill, Dixie Chicks, George Strait, Alan Jackson, Shania Twain, and then even Toby Keith's earlier stuff (Just missed Rascal Flatts unfortunately).

In addition to that you had some great Rock from Metallica, Korn, Tool, Rage, Live, GnR, as well as the beginning of Disturbed.

Not to mention all of your mainstream stuff like Hootie, Matchbox, Dave, BNL, Blues Traveler, Third Eye Blind, U2, REM, Oasis, Boyz II Men, etc.

That's a ton of great music, and I haven't even really touched on Alternative, which is really what the 90s is probably most remembered for. I'm sure I will forget some but we all know the bands, Pearl Jam, Nirvana, STP, Alice in Chains, Chili Peppers, Soundgarden, Bush, Sublime, Counting Crows, Foo Fighters, etc.

I think the 90s takes this in a rout.

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03-06-2013, 06:59 AM
  #90
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1970s were analog. /thread

If you needed more reason to choose the 70's...

Hendrix was still alive
Theoretically the Beatles were still together
The Rolling Stones at their Apex
Led Zeppelin ruled
Pink Floyd broke the sound barrier with Dark Side of the Moon
Neil Young invented grunge


More genres were invented
Fusion jazz
Prog rock
Punk
New wave
Rap (yes I remember sitting in a club listening to some crazy guys talking over music.. live)
Blues bars were you could watch Albert King, Buddy Guy and Junior Wells, Albert Collins etc. from 5 feet away.
Watching Les Paul in his regular gig in NYC
FM radio played stuff like Funkadelic's Maggot Brain
...I could go on

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03-06-2013, 10:08 AM
  #91
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Originally Posted by crump View Post
1970s were analog. /thread

If you needed more reason to choose the 70's...

Hendrix was still alive
Theoretically the Beatles were still together
The Rolling Stones at their Apex
Led Zeppelin ruled
Pink Floyd broke the sound barrier with Dark Side of the Moon
Neil Young invented grunge


More genres were invented
Fusion jazz
Prog rock
Punk
New wave
Rap (yes I remember sitting in a club listening to some crazy guys talking over music.. live)
Blues bars were you could watch Albert King, Buddy Guy and Junior Wells, Albert Collins etc. from 5 feet away.
Watching Les Paul in his regular gig in NYC
FM radio played stuff like Funkadelic's Maggot Brain
...I could go on
Punk was a fusion? BTW, I believe a lot of the 90s was analog too. Metal in the underground and whatnot.

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03-06-2013, 10:19 AM
  #92
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90s for me
90's Alt rock was awesome
Dance Mix 95 was the best dance mix ever made
90's skatepunk still kicks my ass every time I listen to it.
yup the 90s

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03-06-2013, 10:56 AM
  #93
Acadmus
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Originally Posted by BGDDYKWL View Post
See, this is exactly why I think the 90s is the objective right answer. Sure everyone has their preferences, and that's totally fine, but in terms of including as many music genres as possible, it's gotta be the 90s. Rap and Country were either non-existent or sucked before 1990. Rap in the 90s was phenomenal with Tupac, Notorious BIG, Puff, Snoop, Dre, Beastie Boys, Bone, and even early Eminem (among others). Then in Country you had Garth, Tim McGraw, Faith Hill, Dixie Chicks, George Strait, Alan Jackson, Shania Twain, and then even Toby Keith's earlier stuff (Just missed Rascal Flatts unfortunately).

In addition to that you had some great Rock from Metallica, Korn, Tool, Rage, Live, GnR, as well as the beginning of Disturbed.

Not to mention all of your mainstream stuff like Hootie, Matchbox, Dave, BNL, Blues Traveler, Third Eye Blind, U2, REM, Oasis, Boyz II Men, etc.

That's a ton of great music, and I haven't even really touched on Alternative, which is really what the 90s is probably most remembered for. I'm sure I will forget some but we all know the bands, Pearl Jam, Nirvana, STP, Alice in Chains, Chili Peppers, Soundgarden, Bush, Sublime, Counting Crows, Foo Fighters, etc.

I think the 90s takes this in a rout.
Nope. And again, I voted for the 90s, but this is just wrong. Rap didn't suck in the 80s (and I don't even like rap) - Public Enemy, Grandmaster Flash, Beastie Boys, Run-DMC, just to name a few. Country was far better in the 70s than in any other decade with the birth of the "urban country" and "outlaw movement" sounds - I despise most country, but even I like Johnny Paycheck and "Take This Job and Shove It" and Kenny Rogers. Even the stuff you call "mainstream" wasn't mainstream, it was considered alternative rock (except Boyz II Men) and some of those artists (U2 and R.E.M.) did most of their best stuff in the 80s.

70s also had the dawn of electronic music with bands such as Kraftwerk, Gary Numan/Tubeway Army, and Ultravox. The 60s and 70s both were much stronger in singer/songwriter style artists and folk rock music. 80s had the brilliant new wave and new romantic movements. Heavy Metal started in the late 60s and blossomed in the 70s and 80s (if you like that kind of thing, I mostly don't). The array of sounds in the 70s was at least as diverse as in the 90s. And the 80s was right up there too. Things were only thinner in the 60s because the whole genre of rock and roll was just starting to diversify - gotta walk before you run. And things since 1997 have been a bit less diverse thanks to R.E.M.'s putting out a commercial bomb to start a multi-million dollar 5-album contract with Warner Bros. which caused all the record companies to pull back...that's when we got the resurgence of bland pop singers and cookie cutter bands. But even then there's been some good bands that have started up or who broke out commercially in the 00's. Just have to look harder to find them.

So it's just not so clear-cut.


Last edited by Acadmus: 03-06-2013 at 11:05 AM.
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03-06-2013, 11:19 AM
  #94
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Originally Posted by crump View Post
1970s were analog. /thread

If you needed more reason to choose the 70's...
Theoretically the Beatles were still together - McCartney left in April 1970, thus ending the band. Let It Be was released in May, but was recorded almost entirely in January 1969 before Abbey Road - they just didn't like how it came out and shelved it for a year before sending it to Phil Spector and adding one George Harrison song to the list that Lennon didn't participate in recording at all.

The Rolling Stones at their Apex - debatable - their 60s music was better, and Exile on Main Street (the album most cite as their best though it was dull crap) was already out in 1972 so most of the decade was still absent that talent (I'm not a fan of their later work at all).

And don't forget, the 70s also gave us disco...

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03-06-2013, 12:09 PM
  #95
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Punk was a fusion? BTW, I believe a lot of the 90s was analog too. Metal in the underground and whatnot.
never said punk was fusion. but if you want to get technical...

rock + unbridled teenage angst +Puke=punk

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03-06-2013, 01:12 PM
  #96
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Nope. And again, I voted for the 90s, but this is just wrong. Rap didn't suck in the 80s (and I don't even like rap) - Public Enemy, Grandmaster Flash, Beastie Boys, Run-DMC, just to name a few. Country was far better in the 70s than in any other decade with the birth of the "urban country" and "outlaw movement" sounds - I despise most country, but even I like Johnny Paycheck and "Take This Job and Shove It" and Kenny Rogers. Even the stuff you call "mainstream" wasn't mainstream, it was considered alternative rock (except Boyz II Men) and some of those artists (U2 and R.E.M.) did most of their best stuff in the 80s.

70s also had the dawn of electronic music with bands such as Kraftwerk, Gary Numan/Tubeway Army, and Ultravox. The 60s and 70s both were much stronger in singer/songwriter style artists and folk rock music. 80s had the brilliant new wave and new romantic movements. Heavy Metal started in the late 60s and blossomed in the 70s and 80s (if you like that kind of thing, I mostly don't). The array of sounds in the 70s was at least as diverse as in the 90s. And the 80s was right up there too. Things were only thinner in the 60s because the whole genre of rock and roll was just starting to diversify - gotta walk before you run. And things since 1997 have been a bit less diverse thanks to R.E.M.'s putting out a commercial bomb to start a multi-million dollar 5-album contract with Warner Bros. which caused all the record companies to pull back...that's when we got the resurgence of bland pop singers and cookie cutter bands. But even then there's been some good bands that have started up or who broke out commercially in the 00's. Just have to look harder to find them.

So it's just not so clear-cut.
90s was the peak of metal. Not debatable IMO. If you think NWOBHM + speed / thrash metal + grindcore > death metal + black metal + doom metal, then maybe, but I just don't think that's possible.

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03-06-2013, 01:38 PM
  #97
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90s was the peak of metal. Not debatable IMO. If you think NWOBHM + speed / thrash metal + grindcore > death metal + black metal + doom metal, then maybe, but I just don't think that's possible.
Yeah, but when you mention metal to most people, who do they think of? Sabbath, Maiden, Priest, Metallica...not the fly-by-night acts of the more obscure divisions of metal. And yes, metal is still pretty obscure compared to other genres.

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03-06-2013, 02:02 PM
  #98
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I just can't imagine holding the opinion that the 90's are the best, and I was born in 1985.

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03-06-2013, 02:13 PM
  #99
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I still say it's too big to truly measure. There are dozens of albums that I consider to be timeless in almost every decade from the 50's on. Maybe not 2010's but I think that's more a reflection on me not having as much time to devote to learning about and listening to new music than it is any lack of quality stuff out there.

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03-06-2013, 02:21 PM
  #100
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Originally Posted by BGDDYKWL View Post
See, this is exactly why I think the 90s is the objective right answer. Sure everyone has their preferences, and that's totally fine, but in terms of including as many music genres as possible, it's gotta be the 90s. Rap and Country were either non-existent or sucked before 1990.
Guh? The early 1990's and "Achy Breaky Heart" seemed like the beginning of the end for 'real' country music to me. I think Garth Brooks and Travis Tritt would tell you themselves that neither they nor any of their contemporaries can hold a candle to all-time greats like Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Townes Van Zandt, John Prine, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, etc.

I can't think of a single genre from the '90s that wasn't done better in the '60s/'70s (jazz, rock, blues, reggae, pop, latin/salsa), or wasn't rooted heavily in music from that time (hip-hop, electronica, metal).

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