HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The History of Hockey
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The History of Hockey Relive great moments in hockey history and discuss how the game has changed over time.

History of Mandatory Helmets

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
03-06-2013, 01:50 PM
  #1
Crease
Registered User
 
Crease's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,833
vCash: 500
History of Mandatory Helmets

Mark Staal's eye injury last night has reinvogorated a call for mandatory visors in the NHL. I figured it would be timely to make a thread about the history of campaigns for mandatory equipment in the NHL.

I know that Bill Masterton's unfortunate death was a major influence on helmet usage in the NHL. Why then, did it take 11 more years before John Ziegler announced that helmets would be mandatory for new players? What was the legislative process like? What other events, if any, pushed the mandate through?

Crease is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-06-2013, 05:36 PM
  #2
Canadiens1958
Registered User
 
Canadiens1958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 11,636
vCash: 500
Mandatory

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crease View Post
Mark Staal's eye injury last night has reinvogorated a call for mandatory visors in the NHL. I figured it would be timely to make a thread about the history of campaigns for mandatory equipment in the NHL.

I know that Bill Masterton's unfortunate death was a major influence on helmet usage in the NHL. Why then, did it take 11 more years before John Ziegler announced that helmets would be mandatory for new players? What was the legislative process like? What other events, if any, pushed the mandate through?
Process was rather fast after the death of Bill Masterton. Early helmets were not comfortable, didn't sit or fit very well. Various risks outside - plastic tended to crack in cold temperatures.

Once suitable helmets became available in the early 1970s and mandatory in youth hockey, it became inevitable that the NHL would follow suit.

Process took less time than safety measures on construction sites - helmets, metal toed boots, safety goggles. Road safety - seat belts or harnesses, child seats, motorcycle helmets, air bags and other safety features.

Canadiens1958 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-06-2013, 07:24 PM
  #3
Shootmaster_44
Registered User
 
Shootmaster_44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Lloydminster, AB
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,196
vCash: 500
When did helmets become mandatory in international play? I remember hearing about the 1977 Worlds where one of the Canadians pitched their helmet into the crowd.

Shootmaster_44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-06-2013, 08:12 PM
  #4
Ogie Goldthorpe
Piloted Ogre Hog
 
Ogie Goldthorpe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: NS via BC
Posts: 2,602
vCash: 500
A few years back, okay maybe 20 now, didn't the NHL briefly make helmets optional again?

I seem to remember Brett Hull saying he might try going helmet-less for a game.

Ogie Goldthorpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-06-2013, 08:46 PM
  #5
Loto68
Registered User
 
Loto68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Boston
Country: United States
Posts: 859
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogie Goldthorpe View Post
A few years back, okay maybe 20 now, didn't the NHL briefly make helmets optional again?

I seem to remember Brett Hull saying he might try going helmet-less for a game.
Players who played before helmets were mandated were allowed to opt out. People always remember Craig McTavish as the last guy not to wear a helmet but most forget he actually wore one for a while during his career. When they became mandatory for all new players, he took it off as a "just because I can" kind of thing.

Loto68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-06-2013, 09:14 PM
  #6
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 19,798
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogie Goldthorpe View Post
A few years back, okay maybe 20 now, didn't the NHL briefly make helmets optional again?

I seem to remember Brett Hull saying he might try going helmet-less for a game.

1992-'93. I have no idea why the NHL did that then either. No one was helmetless anymore. By my count only Carlyle, Marsh and MacTavish were helmetless in the NHL at that time. I seem to recall Jeremy Roenick claiming he would feel safer on his motorcycle helmetless than an NHL game.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shootmaster_44 View Post
When did helmets become mandatory in international play? I remember hearing about the 1977 Worlds where one of the Canadians pitched their helmet into the crowd.
I know Phil Esposito was forced to wear one and he hated it. I guess this rule didn't translate to Canada Cups though. I remember Doug Wilson and Larry Robinson were helmetless in the 1984 Canada Cup.

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-06-2013, 10:57 PM
  #7
nutbar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,130
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shootmaster_44 View Post
When did helmets become mandatory in international play? I remember hearing about the 1977 Worlds where one of the Canadians pitched their helmet into the crowd.
The IIHF made helmets mandatory in 1970. Yes, that was Esposito who threw his helmet into the stands (aiming for IIHF prez Sabetzki) in 1977

nutbar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-07-2013, 12:46 AM
  #8
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 23,581
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
... Once suitable helmets became available in the early 1970s and mandatory in youth hockey...
In 1960 when Red Kelly was traded to Toronto he started wearing a helmet, and as an also duly elected member of Canadian Parliament was an outspoken advocate for their mandatory use at the amateur levels. In 1964 the then Toronto Hockey League (MTHL then GTHL) mandated their use affecting 200,000 players. Kelly also pressed for their mandatory use in the Metro Toronto & OHA Jr. Leagues who soon followed suit with the THL. Montreal & Quebec I believe followed later, Western Canada I have no idea.

Killion is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
03-07-2013, 03:20 AM
  #9
Canadiens1958
Registered User
 
Canadiens1958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 11,636
vCash: 500
Jurisdictions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
In 1960 when Red Kelly was traded to Toronto he started wearing a helmet, and as an also duly elected member of Canadian Parliament was an outspoken advocate for their mandatory use at the amateur levels. In 1964 the then Toronto Hockey League (MTHL then GTHL) mandated their use affecting 200,000 players. Kelly also pressed for their mandatory use in the Metro Toronto & OHA Jr. Leagues who soon followed suit with the THL. Montreal & Quebec I believe followed later, Western Canada I have no idea.
By 1963-64 some teams, associations or leagues had mandatory helmet rules or a phase in process in place. Provincial or national rules came later.

Hockey Quebec was formed in 1976 which effectively brought various Quebec jurisdictions under one umbrella.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hockey_Qu%C3%A9bec

Canadiens1958 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-07-2013, 10:22 AM
  #10
mobilus
Registered User
 
mobilus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: high slot
Posts: 607
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogie Goldthorpe View Post
A few years back, okay maybe 20 now, didn't the NHL briefly make helmets optional again?

I seem to remember Brett Hull saying he might try going helmet-less for a game.
I believe that was when Gil Stein was president. I recall a big uproar from the public and the "option" was quickly removed.

mobilus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-07-2013, 11:16 AM
  #11
blamebettman*
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Country: Norway
Posts: 1,948
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
1992-'93. I have no idea why the NHL did that then either. No one was helmetless anymore. By my count only Carlyle, Marsh and MacTavish were helmetless in the NHL at that time. I seem to recall Jeremy Roenick claiming he would feel safer on his motorcycle helmetless than an NHL game.



I know Phil Esposito was forced to wear one and he hated it. I guess this rule didn't translate to Canada Cups though. I remember Doug Wilson and Larry Robinson were helmetless in the 1984 Canada Cup.
Rod Langway was also still helmet-less, as was Doug Wilson

Marsh tried the helmet and said he had never seen so many high sticks near his head than the game he wore a helmet

blamebettman* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-07-2013, 01:24 PM
  #12
Ogie Goldthorpe
Piloted Ogre Hog
 
Ogie Goldthorpe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: NS via BC
Posts: 2,602
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
In 1960 when Red Kelly was traded to Toronto he started wearing a helmet, and as an also duly elected member of Canadian Parliament was an outspoken advocate for their mandatory use at the amateur levels. In 1964 the then Toronto Hockey League (MTHL then GTHL) mandated their use affecting 200,000 players. Kelly also pressed for their mandatory use in the Metro Toronto & OHA Jr. Leagues who soon followed suit with the THL. Montreal & Quebec I believe followed later, Western Canada I have no idea.
I started playing minor hockey in Vancouver in 1970-1971. IIRC, it was the first year that mouth guards were mandatory. I was very young, but also seem to remember talk at the time that made it seem like mandatory helmets were also a relatively new idea.

Ogie Goldthorpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-09-2013, 03:03 PM
  #13
ICM1970
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ottawa, ON
Country: Canada
Posts: 181
vCash: 500
I have studied the issue over the last number of years, hoping that I am not too verbose here.

In 1968, Clarence Campbell stated that the best helmets were certainly available to the players if they wished but balked at making them mandatory as an attempt to do so following the Ace Bailey/Eddie Shore incident in 1933 failed miserably with almost nobody obeying the law. Many players in 1968 still thought it should still be a personal decision and that there were concerns even at that time about increased stick related offences as noticed in the kids and US NCAA leagues at the time.

NHLPA head Alan Eagleson (later brought down on theft and corruption charges) still had his eye on making the helmets mandatory and made such a thing more politically correct following a 1978 incident in which Buffalo's Rick Martin fell awkwardly and suffered convulsions. It was probably easier with John Ziegler as NHL president to do this after Campbell's retirement. The 1979 grandfathering law was created and passed, but certainly not without controversy. Ones like Don Cherry, Fred Shero, Eddie Westfall, Larry Robinson, Barry Beck, Brad Park, and Phil Esposito at one time or another publicly criticized the law as having or about to bring in more stickwork and cheapshots. I even have a Hockey News from about 1980 that discussed the Quebec junior league's decision to make cages mandatory for the players. One coach discussed how he noticed that sticks were being used like war clubs by the younger players where the cages had been mandatory since the mid 70s.

It is hard to tell what will happen in the NHL concerning the calls for mandatory visors. However, I am convinced that what happened to the game is not dissimilar as to what took place in the United States in the 1920s with Prohibition on alcohol. Prohibition replaced a drinking culture involving beer, wine, whiskey, and saloons with one that featured bathtub gin, speakeasies, and gangland warfare with Al Capone et al. Forcing Junior A, US NCAA, and NHL players to wear helmets and facemasks along with bans on fighting replaced a culture that featured open ice hitting with the hips and shoulders and a few fights with one that has armourlike equipment, headshots, hitting from behind, and concussion and neck injury problems that continue unabated.

ICM1970 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
03-09-2013, 03:24 PM
  #14
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 23,581
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ICM1970 View Post
...Forcing Junior A, US NCAA, and NHL players to wear helmets and facemasks along with bans on fighting replaced a culture that featured open ice hitting with the hips and shoulders and a few fights with one that has armourlike equipment, headshots, hitting from behind, and concussion and neck injury problems that continue unabated.
Ya. Robocops. Bullet proof polymers including kevlar in shoulder & elbow pads. Increased sense of indestructibility which in youth already runs high even buck naked. No fear, realization of the ramifications. Lack of respect. Serious problem. Helmets & mouth guards, the inserts absolutely. Full cage no. 1/2 mask shields at the amateur & Jr levels yes. They need to mandate soft leather capping to shoulder & elbow pads, with give. Rescind the instigator penalty.

Killion is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
03-09-2013, 03:35 PM
  #15
BamBamCam*
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Seattle/Boston
Country: Ireland
Posts: 1,395
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crease View Post
Mark Staal's eye injury last night has reinvogorated a call for mandatory visors in the NHL. I figured it would be timely to make a thread about the history of campaigns for mandatory equipment in the NHL.

I know that Bill Masterton's unfortunate death was a major influence on helmet usage in the NHL. Why then, did it take 11 more years before John Ziegler announced that helmets would be mandatory for new players? What was the legislative process like? What other events, if any, pushed the mandate through?

Seems like an underlying agenda in this post.

My question is always, what's the next piece of equipment you want to force on players when some other injury happens because it never stops with some fans. Checking causes injuries, when is that going to be debated and taken away? Slap shots cause injuries, Chara's slapshot is over 105 MHP, what is everyone going to do when that injuries someone real bad?

More armor = more injuries Players tend to think they are indestructible the more equipment you put on them.

BamBamCam* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-09-2013, 03:37 PM
  #16
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 19,798
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ICM1970 View Post
It is hard to tell what will happen in the NHL concerning the calls for mandatory visors. However, I am convinced that what happened to the game is not dissimilar as to what took place in the United States in the 1920s with Prohibition on alcohol. Prohibition replaced a drinking culture involving beer, wine, whiskey, and saloons with one that featured bathtub gin, speakeasies, and gangland warfare with Al Capone et al. Forcing Junior A, US NCAA, and NHL players to wear helmets and facemasks along with bans on fighting replaced a culture that featured open ice hitting with the hips and shoulders and a few fights with one that has armourlike equipment, headshots, hitting from behind, and concussion and neck injury problems that continue unabated.
Good call. Yes, Cherry to this day talks about how he and Robinson claimed that head injuries would skyrocket with the mandatory helmet use. Anyone that claims Don Cherry is senile would never bring this up, but he's right. The amount of hits from behind we see today just simply never happened to a player without a helmet. It isn't as if hockey wasn't violent in the 1970s either because it was still very much a tough game as we know, it is just that the game has become more and more careless as time goes on. A stick to the eye? Okay, let's try and make visors mandatory. Wrong answer. It will only make things worse. When the equipment inflates the respect goes down.

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-09-2013, 08:15 PM
  #17
darkhorse686
Registered User
 
darkhorse686's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Toronto
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
What were the head protection rules concerning goalies?

darkhorse686 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-09-2013, 09:24 PM
  #18
BamBamCam*
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Seattle/Boston
Country: Ireland
Posts: 1,395
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkhorse686 View Post
What were the head protection rules concerning goalies?
I don't really think there were rules put in place originally like the player's helmets were. Goalies started putting masks on as players started using the slap shot more. I know the first ones were in the 30s including the first wire cage mask but they didn't stick. Then in the 50s with players like Boom Boom Geoffrion skating they all started putting them on.

BamBamCam* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-09-2013, 09:57 PM
  #19
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 23,581
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkhorse686 View Post
What were the head protection rules concerning goalies?
At the amateur levels in Ontario, Toronto, in 1964 along with the helmet for players. At the professional & Jr. levels, optional. The first mask worn was by a woman, a fencing mask back in 1927 to protect her face & teeth. In 1930, Clint Benedict suffered a broken nose, donning a football nose guard while recovering, a single leather bar that ran down from the forehead but he got rid of it as soon as able. A guy playing pro in the UK designed a metal cage with leather padding similar to an Umps baseball mask and either a Swedish or Finish goalie wore a similar Catchers mask at the 1936 Olympics. Early 50's, a guy named Louch came out with what was similar to the full clear plastic lexan face shields, worn in practice, tried out by Bower & a few others, but they fogged up, were hot, cumbersome.

Plante messed around with the Louch, painting it, cutting out eye, nose & mouth holes, heating it to contour to the face, adding pads for comfort but no go, fragile, not worth the bother. He turned to fibreglass, then a fairly new & innovative product, crudely making several models, using them in practice but never in-game until Bathgate cut him wide open in-game, the rest history. Lefty Wilson, spare & practice goalie along with Trainer in Detroit made Sawchuks first mask as well, a cottage industry springing up thereafter, making masks for a whole host of amateur, Jr/Sr, minor pro & NHL goaltenders. Cooper, D&R & others until the mid-60's only having cages available, at first the baseball models, then those that you could attach to a regular helmet. They then started mass producing plastic & fiberglass jobbies bought off the shelf by the later 60's, including back & crown plates to protect the rest of ones head, Jacques Plante as well through a manufacturer providing either off the shelf or custom "Plante" models, like the one he wore in Toronto, that Parent & a few others used. Alternatively, you could get a custom mask made by any number of people by then producing them.

Killion is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
03-10-2013, 12:03 AM
  #20
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 19,798
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by BamBamCam View Post
I don't really think there were rules put in place originally like the player's helmets were. Goalies started putting masks on as players started using the slap shot more. I know the first ones were in the 30s including the first wire cage mask but they didn't stick. Then in the 50s with players like Boom Boom Geoffrion skating they all started putting them on.
Jacques Plante put the first one on in 1959 unless you want to count Clint Benedict who wore one in 1930 to recover from a broken nose. By 1974 the last goalie to go maskless (Andy Brown) faded away. Some goalies just never liked it. Johnny Bower and Gump Worsley are two goalies who played long after 1959 that never wore a mask.

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-10-2013, 03:29 AM
  #21
Crease
Registered User
 
Crease's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,833
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by BamBamCam View Post
More armor = more injuries Players tend to think they are indestructible the more equipment you put on them.
I don't disagree.

Crease is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-10-2013, 04:00 AM
  #22
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 23,581
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Jacques Plante put the first one on in 1959 unless you want to count Clint Benedict...
Ya, the rise of the slapshot, and it was a Bathgate slapper that cut Plante, soon picked up by Mikita & Hull. Interestingly though, its Alex Shibicky from the late 30's who's credited with first using that shot regularly. Absent the curved blade, not nearly as unpredictable. Nor do I believe he'd have gotten a whole lot of mustard on it using what were pretty rudimentary sticks back then.

Killion is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
03-10-2013, 04:42 AM
  #23
Sanf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 276
vCash: 500
During the goalie project I accidentally find trivia about Clint Benedict. (Did post this already somewhere but it wasn´t on history section)

Quote:
The Montreal Gazette Oct 27 1932

Clint Benedict, one of the greatest net guardians that ever blocked a goal mouth is seriously considering a return to hockey in a playing capacity. Just whom he will play with or where is at present an uncertainty, but aided by a special pair of glasses and a mask of his own design. Benedict gave his new "head gear" a thorough test last night, after which he expressed the opinion that it was perfect.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...clint+benedict

Sanf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-10-2013, 10:10 AM
  #24
BamBamCam*
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Seattle/Boston
Country: Ireland
Posts: 1,395
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Jacques Plante put the first one on in 1959 unless you want to count Clint Benedict who wore one in 1930 to recover from a broken nose. By 1974 the last goalie to go maskless (Andy Brown) faded away. Some goalies just never liked it. Johnny Bower and Gump Worsley are two goalies who played long after 1959 that never wore a mask.
Yes very true but there was a goalie from Japan in the 30s that put a full cage mask on during the Olympics. There was a few others besides Clint Benedict, Roy Mosgrove was another but the honor should probably go to Bathgate and Plante like you said.

BamBamCam* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-10-2013, 01:45 PM
  #25
Killion
Global Moderator
 
Killion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Casablanca
Country: Morocco
Posts: 23,581
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by BamBamCam View Post
Yes very true but there was a goalie from Japan in the 30s that put a full cage mask on during the Olympics. There was a few others besides Clint Benedict, Roy Mosgrove was another but the honor should probably go to Bathgate and Plante like you said.
Certainly at the NHL level as it being a fairly seminal moment, Plante wearing it thereafter for good, but no, not "the first". That goes to woman, donning a Fencing Mask in the 20's. Benedict in 1930, though really not much of a "mask" per se'. Mosgrove who played pro in the UK in the 30's and a few international players as well with the wire cages (a Swede or Finn at the 1936 Olympics for eg)...

Killion is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:30 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2015 All Rights Reserved.