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Which franchise has had best luck in the draft all-time

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Old
03-16-2013, 11:43 AM
  #26
Brewsky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Yoda View Post
Yeah it got to be Penguins. We even got the next top ten player of all time on our team right now.

But, we suffered real well to get so lucky.
Ha a Pens fan telling a Leafs fan about suffering, get the tissues!

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Old
03-16-2013, 10:51 PM
  #27
pdd
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Originally Posted by Lshap View Post
No. This is a myth.

Bruins signed Bobby Orr out of a small Ontario town when he was...what... 12? Any team could sign anyone. You just had to find them. Pre-draft Quebec produced Jean Ratelle, Marcel Dionne, Rod Gilbert, Marcel Pronovost, Bernie Parent, etc, etc, etc. All were signed by other teams.

I'm surprised people still believe that fairy-tale about Montreal and french players.
Dionne was drafted by Detroit. He went second overall, after Lafleur. That's why there's the whole "What if Montreal had taken Dionne instead?" scenario that sometimes gets talked about. Because Dionne was pretty ******* good and could actually play center at the NHL level (Lafleur was a center in juniors, but failed at center in the NHL despite multiple attempts to play him there). It's an interesting thought exercise. And also the point is he was drafted!

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03-16-2013, 11:00 PM
  #28
Darth Yoda
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Originally Posted by Brewsky View Post
Ha a Pens fan telling a Leafs fan about suffering, get the tissues!
Yeah but you guys have too much money to ever finish dead last. Not great fun anyway though.

As for people pretending to loose track of who i was aiming for: You're all jealous and time will tell you that.

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Old
03-18-2013, 02:31 PM
  #29
JetsAlternate
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Here's a bit of extra information regarding the Red Wings almost drafting Bure in the 5th round of the 1989 draft. Gil Stein told them he was unavailable. The Oilers, meanwhile, wanted to draft Bure as well. Neither had proof that Pavel was eligible, and thus neither could draft him. If the Wings had known, he would have been a Red Wing.

Courtesy of Wikipedia, with Kerry Banks' 1999 Bure biography as its source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pavel_B...2.80.931991.29
Quote:
Bure was selected 113th overall in the 6th round of the 1989 NHL Entry Draft by the Vancouver Canucks, following his rookie season with CSKA Moscow. The pick was controversial, as the Canucks had chosen him seemingly a year ahead of his eligible draft season. At the age of 18, he was available to be chosen in the first three rounds of the draft, but in order to be selected any later than that, he would've had to have played in at least two seasons (with a minimum of 11 games per season) for his elite-level European club, the Central Red Army.[19] However, the Canucks' head scout at the time, Mike Penny, discovered that Bure had played in additional exhibition and international games to make him an eligible late-round draft choice a year early.[3][4]

Several other teams either had similar knowledge or had pursued Bure, but there was confusion as to the legitimacy of the extra games. The Detroit Red Wings had inquired to league vice president Gil Stein as to Bure's supposed availability prior to their fifth-round pick, but were told that he was not eligible.[19] Winnipeg Jets general manager Mike Smith claimed he travelled to Moscow prior to the draft and made an offer to the Soviet Ice Hockey Federation. The deal involved a transfer fee to be paid to the Soviets over three years, after which time, Bure would join the Jets as a 21-year-old. Smith did not have any plans to draft Bure in 1989, however, as he believed Bure was ineligible.[20]

General manager Pat Quinn originally intended to draft Bure in the eighth round, but after receiving word that the Edmonton Oilers had similar intentions, he selected him in the sixth.[19] Detroit's European scout Christer Rockstrom immediately began protesting, while several other unidentified team representatives reportedly stormed the Met Center stage in Minnesota, where the draft was being held, following the announcement of Bure's draft.[21] The Hartford Whalers and Washington Capitals then filed formal complaints to the league, resulting in an investigation into the selection.[19] After the pick was deemed illegal by league president John Ziegler in a press release on May 17, 1990, the Canucks appealed the decision, procuring game sheets proving Bure's participation in the additional games with the help of recent Soviet acquisition Igor Larionov. It was not until the eve of the 1990 NHL Entry Draft, in which Bure would have been re-entered, that the draft choice was upheld.[19]
According to a June 1990 article by Mike Beamish of the Vancouver Sun, Bure was seen as one of the top prospects in the 1989 draft, perhaps even touted to be the best:

http://www.pbfc.org/oldnews.html
Quote:
Canucks in no hurry to bring young Soviet star to NHL
by Mike Beamish - - Vancouver Sun
June 16, 1990

It took almost a year for the Canucks to confirm that Pavel Bure finally was theirs - and they're in no hurry to rush the Soviet Junior hockey star to Vancouver.

"Certainly, the process has begun," said Arthur Griffiths, the Canucks' assistant to the chairman, commenting on league president John Ziegler's reversal of an earlier decision that allows the Canucks to retain Bure's playing rights.

Bure was picked by the Canucks in the sixth round of the 1989 NHL draft but only because of questions about his availability. Many scouts considered him the best eligible a year ago.

"We expect him to play in Vancouver sometime in the next few years, but we're not going to rush the process," Griffiths said. "Unless the Soviets have changed their approach, he won't be coming out soon. If there is a change, of course we'd have to pursue it."

The Canucks expect Bure, an explosive, 19-year old left winger who was a second team all-star at this year's world championships, to be available to play in the NHL following the 1994 Olympics.

Yet the changes in the Soviet Union over the past few months are so profound that the situation could change dramatically.

"There is a rule in my country that a hockey player does not have the right to go abroad and play until he is 28 years old," Bure told the Toronto Star through an interpreter. "But everything is changing at home very quickly these days, so who knows what the future brings?"

Bure plays with the Central Red Army and the national team, both coached by Viktor Tikhonov, the Soviet Union Mount Rushmore. But even Tikhonov, who is loved by his players about as much as Zsa Zsa likes traffic cops, is starting to crumble in the era of new freedoms.

After the Soviets won the gold medal at this year's world championships, with a lineup that included many returnees from the NHL, Tikhonov said that the Soviets might release younger players for the right price.

"To be in the NHL is not any large goal of mine but a man wants to know other countries and to play hockey in a new place would be a way to find out," Bure said.

It is fitting that the Canucks' center Igor Larionov played a major role in helping the Canucks secure Bure's rights. Larionov went to Moscow and obtained information from the Soviet Ice Hockey Federation that confirmed Bure's eligibility to be picked by Vancouver.

Last April, Bure, Alexander Mogilny and Sergei Fedorov were being groomed to replace the fabled but aging KLM line of Larionov, Vladimir Krutov and Sergei Makharov, who were being sold to the NHL for hard currency.

Bure, a Moscow native, has been enrolled in the Central Red Army sports club since he was six. He is used to strict discipline. Emulating Mogilny would be unthinkable to him.

"I could never do what Alexander did, no matter what happens," Bure said. "I could never leave my family and friends that way."

So the Canucks will have to find another way.

Arthur, get your cheque book.
Oh, if the Wings could have drafted him.


Last edited by JetsAlternate: 03-18-2013 at 04:09 PM.
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03-18-2013, 04:08 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JetsAlternate View Post
Here's a bit of extra information regarding the Red Wings almost drafting Bure in the 5th round of the 1989 draft. Gil Stein told them he was unavailable. The Oilers, meanwhile, wanted to draft Bure as well. Neither had proof that Pavel was eligible, and thus neither could draft him. If the Wings had known, he would have been a Red Wing.

Courtesy of Wikipedia, with Kerry Bank's 1999 Bure biography as its source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pavel_B...2.80.931991.29


According to a June 1990 article by Mike Beamish of the Vancouver Sun, Bure was seen as one of the top prospects in the 1989 draft, perhaps even touted to be the best:

http://www.pbfc.org/oldnews.html


Oh, if the Wings could have drafted him.
yeah, that would have been awesome. the kournikova feud gets a head start, gets bigger, destroys the dressing room, no cups, roy retires with as many championships as gretzky and mario combined and walks away on top in '02 like he's michael jordan.

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03-18-2013, 04:12 PM
  #31
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Originally Posted by vadim sharifijanov View Post
yeah, that would have been awesome. the kournikova feud gets a head start, gets bigger, destroys the dressing room, no cups, roy retires with as many championships as gretzky and mario combined and walks away on top in '02 like he's michael jordan.
Maybe the Kournikova feud doesn't start at all. The two met in 1999. Kournikova was 10 years old in 1991. An entirely different life can be lived in eight years. Perhaps Fedorov and Bure walk away from hockey as best friends, having grown up together. Of course, instead of Odjick and Larionov to gravitate towards, Pavel would have associated himself with a different group of friends in Detroit.

Maybe it wouldn't have been so good after all without Gino. It would have pushed that Detroit team over the top, though, providing for an even more exciting product and perhaps elevating his career to another level.

We wouldn't have been able to see Bure in Vancouver, though, which would have had several repercussions on the team and the fanbase. Support for the team grew exponentially as a result of Bure's presence.


Last edited by JetsAlternate: 03-18-2013 at 04:20 PM.
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Old
03-18-2013, 06:28 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JetsAlternate View Post
Maybe the Kournikova feud doesn't start at all. The two met in 1999. Kournikova was 10 years old in 1991. An entirely different life can be lived in eight years. Perhaps Fedorov and Bure walk away from hockey as best friends, having grown up together. Of course, instead of Odjick and Larionov to gravitate towards, Pavel would have associated himself with a different group of friends in Detroit.

Maybe it wouldn't have been so good after all without Gino. It would have pushed that Detroit team over the top, though, providing for an even more exciting product and perhaps elevating his career to another level.

We wouldn't have been able to see Bure in Vancouver, though, which would have had several repercussions on the team and the fanbase. Support for the team grew exponentially as a result of Bure's presence.
Without Bure as a draw, do the Canucks survive the 90's, or do they join the Jets and Nordiques in moving south? Does Griffiths build GM Place if he doesn't have a top player that would bring in fans? Do the Canucks make the Final in 1994 without Bure on the team? What would that have done for the continued success of the Canucks in Vancouver?

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