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1960 NHL June Meetings

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04-17-2013, 12:57 PM
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Canadiens1958
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1960 NHL June Meetings

An overview of the 1960 NHL June Meetings. Held in Montreal. Trade rumours, actual trades, drafts, expansion talk:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...6912%2C1282695

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...6937%2C1466814

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...7089%2C1696549


Interesting to see who was and wasn't protected. Seems that the Canadiens did not protect André Pronovost.

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04-17-2013, 01:38 PM
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tarheelhockey
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Interesting to see the early rumbles of an expansion to Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Also, this sentiment is new to my ears:

"The war years ******** the development of hockey players but the governors feel that this predicament is rapidly diminishing and in the foreseeable future available players of NHL calibre will make expansion not only feasible but practical." -- from the official announcement of interest by the Board of Governors

Interesting that, a full 15 years after the war, the Governors were just beginning to feel that the talent pool had been replenished. I've never heard that particular rationale for keeping the league at 6 teams for so long.

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04-17-2013, 05:44 PM
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Says Montreal claimed Ted Green in the inter-league draft, I wonder how he ended up with Boston after that, imagine him on the blueline for the Habs during the 60s...much to Bobby Orr's chagrin, i'm sure.

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04-18-2013, 06:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tarheelhockey View Post
Interesting that, a full 15 years after the war, the Governors were just beginning to feel that the talent pool had been replenished. I've never heard that particular rationale for keeping the league at 6 teams for so long.
Ya thats creative. Fact is, it was a closed shop & they didnt want to expand/share & spread the wealth. It was the new generation of owners coming in late 50's early 60's in New York & Toronto combined with the rise of television, places like Cleveland threatening anti-trust, the spectre of a joint AHL/WHL amalgamation that potentially could usurp the NHL's role as the preeminent league in North America amongst other factors that precipitated expansion. That they'd use the "talent pool isnt deep enough" excuse does strike one as being amusingly disingenuous yes?

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04-18-2013, 07:33 PM
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Talent Pool.

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Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Ya thats creative. Fact is, it was a closed shop & they didnt want to expand/share & spread the wealth. It was the new generation of owners coming in late 50's early 60's in New York & Toronto combined with the rise of television, places like Cleveland threatening anti-trust, the spectre of a joint AHL/WHL amalgamation that potentially could usurp the NHL's role as the preeminent league in North America amongst other factors that precipitated expansion. That they'd use the "talent pool isnt deep enough" excuse does strike one as being amusingly disingenuous yes?
The talent pool argument used by the NHL owners is rather quaint.

Specifically, the Norris family owners of the Detroit Red Wings (father and son) had serious anti-trust problems with the U.S government and their pro boxing monopoly. International Boxing Club vs U.S. Similar deficient talent pool arguments were used in boxing to limit competition.

By the mid 1950s, when the NHL June draft was introduced, the governors found ways to park talent safely outside the draft. Junior grads were encouraged to go to US university programs to continue their development - Bill Hay, a solid mid fifties Canadiens prospect, sold to Chicago, won the 1960 Calder, Red Berenson, Lou Angotti amongst others. Likewise prospects out of junior were parked with semi-pro or Senior teams.

Talent was more than sufficient to expand comfortably.

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04-18-2013, 08:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
The talent pool argument used by the NHL owners is rather quaint.

Specifically, the Norris family owners of the Detroit Red Wings (father and son) had serious anti-trust problems with the U.S government and their pro boxing monopoly. International Boxing Club vs U.S. Similar deficient talent pool arguments were used in boxing to limit competition.

Talent was more than sufficient to expand comfortably.
Yes it was rather "quaint" and to cute by half, more than sufficient to have expanded far earlier than 1967/68. That teams like Cleveland and elsewhere had their own farm systems; that the top teams in the AHL couldve probably fairly handily beaten Boston & New York, Toronto or Detroit etc on a good night speaks volumes right there. The WHL as well though not quite on par did play an inter-locking schedule with the AHL early 60's, a very troublesome development to the NHL who eyed the westcoast markets with no small envy as population shifts were ever increasing from the east to the west in the 50's & 60's. Decent sized arenas' going up post WW2. Television ascendant, moving from New York to LA etc....

and yes, the Feds broke up the Norris owned & controlled IBC. It beggars belief to think that prosecutors, noted for their dogged & often times over-zealous pursuit of those engaged in acts of anti-trust wouldve just backed off in finishing the job in then going after the NHL itself and the myriad arenas controlled by the Norris clan and their known Mob Associates (the Rico Act wasnt established until 1970) if some sort of deal hadnt been struck. At that time Hoover was in charge of the FBI, and for years he refused to even agree that such a thing as the Cosa Nostra even existed, literally from the late 20's through the late 50's. Turned a blind eye to the IBC & by rote the NHL. The reasons for his doing so rumoured to be that key figures in the Mob had pictures of him en flagrante' dressed as a woman with Rent Boys in a luxury suite at the Astoria Hotel in New York City.

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04-18-2013, 08:55 PM
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Alexander Cup

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Yes it was rather "quaint" and to cute by half, more than sufficient to have expanded far earlier than 1967/68. That teams like Cleveland and elsewhere had their own farm systems; that the top teams in the AHL couldve probably fairly handily beaten Boston & New York, Toronto or Detroit etc on a good night speaks volumes right there. The WHL as well though not quite on par did play an inter-locking schedule with the AHL early 60's, a very troublesome development to the NHL who eyed the westcoast markets with no small envy as population shifts were ever increasing from the east to the west in the 50's & 60's. Decent sized arenas' going up post WW2. Television ascendant, moving from New York to LA etc....

and yes, the Feds broke up the Norris owned & controlled IBC. It beggars belief to think that prosecutors, noted for their dogged & often times over-zealous pursuit of those engaged in acts of anti-trust wouldve just backed off in finishing the job in then going after the NHL itself and the myriad arenas controlled by the Norris clan and their known Mob Associates (the Rico Act wasnt established until 1970) if some sort of deal hadnt been struck. At that time Hoover was in charge of the FBI, and for years he refused to even agree that such a thing as the Cosa Nostra even existed, literally from the late 20's through the late 50's. Turned a blind eye to the IBC & by rote the NHL. The reasons for his doing so rumoured to be that key figures in the Mob had pictures of him en flagrante' dressed as a woman with Rent Boys in a luxury suite at the Astoria Hotel in New York City.
The Alexander Cup :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Cup

continued a few seasons beyond 1954 as a competition between the QHL and the WHL champions. Will find data within the week.

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04-18-2013, 09:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
The Alexander Cup : continued a few seasons beyond 1954 as a competition between the QHL and the WHL champions. Will find data within the week.
Thats interesting. I'll leave it to your further research, but on the surface appears to be localised to Quebec & the Maritimes, though perhaps teams from Ontario & western Canada did in fact compete for that cup (seems almost impossible that they wouldnt have unless $$$ was a factor pursuant to travel from west of Ontario). The Q was certainly the class of the semi-pro Amateur Status leagues in Canada at that time, though this Maritime League? New one on me. Was it an offshoot of the Negro Leagues perhaps, or were the Negro Leagues pretty much done by 1950? Ive read the calibre was quite good. Indeed, the Quebec Aces with the famous Black Aces Line quite the juggernaut late 40's early 50's.

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04-18-2013, 09:23 PM
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Maritimes

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Thats interesting. I'll leave it to your further research, but on the surface appears to be localised to Quebec & the Maritimes, though perhaps teams from Ontario & western Canada did in fact compete for that cup (seems almost impossible that they wouldnt have unless $$$ was a factor pursuant to travel from west of Ontario). The Q was certainly the class of the semi-pro Amateur Status leagues in Canada at that time, though this Maritime League? New one on me. Was it an offshoot of the Negro Leagues perhaps, or were the Negro Leagues pretty much done by 1950? Ive read the calibre was quite good. Indeed, the Quebec Aces with the famous Black Aces Line quite the juggernaut late 40's early 50's.
Maritimes post WWII offered a decent level of hockey at the junior and senior hockey levels. Example would be Al MacNeil and Parker MacDonald playing for the Marlies in the first half of the fifties and then the NHL. John Hanna also made it in the mid fifties, NHL late fifties.

New Brunswick and Nova Scotia or the McCains and Irvings. Will get something up in the next little while.

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04-18-2013, 09:41 PM
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Cape Breton Senior Hockey League

A sample of Maritime hockey from the 1949-50 season. Reasonable coaching with a few recognizable past and future NHL or minor pro players:

http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/stats/l...l19481950.html

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04-18-2013, 10:58 PM
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Ya, interesting, as you mention, Parker MacDonald & several others. Flighty NHL careers, solid minor leaguers. Some tremendous players came from the Maritimes. Not exactly household names, held back in a number of instances by they themselves as a result of the 2nd class status many were accorded by the establishment really right into the 70's. If they didnt already have chips on their shoulders they soon developed them coming to play in Ontario. I remember playing with & against some serious Phenoms in AAA & Jr who just up & quit, heads not into it thanks to the abuse they were forced to endure. The culture of Bigotry rather appalling to say the least. Nothing sacrosanct, words spoken that cut pretty deep for what were essentially fairly sensitive Celtic Souls. God Damn shame really. One guy in particular I remember from Newfoundland who at 16 could wilfully blow past some serious names in the NHL at that time. In total control of the puck like they were pylons. Very nasty piece of work to boot. Exactly what anyone & everyone wanted in a Right Winger. Very rare creature.

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