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The History of Hockey Relive great moments in hockey history and discuss how the game has changed over time.

Does anyone else completely miss the #66/#99 era?

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04-04-2013, 08:22 PM
  #1
tazzy19
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Does anyone else completely miss the #66/#99 era?

In light of all the Gretzky vs Lemieux vs Crosby (don't ask me how on the latter name) threads, I thought it would be nice to have a thread celebrating Wayne & Mario. I now realize how lucky I was to have been a hockey fan during the late 80s and early 90s when these two were putting on shows on a nightly basis. I want this NOT to be a Wayne vs. Mario thread, but rather more of reminiscing thread about the most amazing things you remember them doing on the ice.

Mine was watching the Penguins in back to back Stanley Cup finals, and watching something that Mario did that didn't even result in a goal, but was as spectacular as anything I'd ever seen him do. He had just finished dominating another playoffs, and about to win another Conn Smythe. It was the last game of the finals against the Blackhawks. He found himself by himself in front of the net, to Hasek's right with the puck. The puck just somehow came to him as it so often did. In that moment, it was just him and Hasek, no one else around. He fakes a forehand shot, cuts to the right and -- all in one motion -- drops the puck between his legs to a penguin who was just behind him that not even the camera men had picked up -- and somehow this other Penguin missed a wide open net with Hasek sprawled out of position. It was something only two players in the world could have done, and that magic was his that night.

Anyone else miss these guys as much as I do? Any other memories you wish to share?


Last edited by tazzy19: 04-05-2013 at 12:36 AM.
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04-04-2013, 08:32 PM
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Big Phil
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Nothing wrong with a thread like this. We haven't seen their like since and in a way got a little spoiled with both of them. Maybe we took it for granted a little bit, but in a subconcious way. I think with Gretzky it was him doing things that didn't make sense on the ice and then a split second later you'd say "Ah..........I see." In other words, he knew what he was going to do before he did it and just needed to wait until everything was in place. For me that split second moment was the 1987 Canada Cup. He and Murphy are on a two on one in the dying seconds and I like those odds. Mario isn't in the field of view yet and for some reason Gretzky slows the play down. I was thinking in my head "Give it to Murphy!" but Wayne knew what he was doing and he just wanted to make sure Mario was in place first. Once he was, it was pure magic.

With Mario it was a lot of things. But the fact that he could somehow roof the shot over the goalie's shoulder off the inside of the post and into the top corner was something I always marvelled at. A couple inches and it hits the post and goes wide. But for whatever reason Mario just always seemed to bury those goals with ease.

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04-04-2013, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tazzy19 View Post
In light of all the Gretzky vs Lemieux vs Crosby (don't ask me how on the latter name) threads, I thought it would be nice to have a thread celebrating Wayne & Mario. I now realize how lucky I was to have been a hockey fan during the late 80s and early 90s when these two were putting on shows on a nightly basis. I want this NOT to be a Wayne vs. Mario thread, but rather more of reminiscing thread about the most amazing things you remember them doing on the ice.

Mine was watching the Penguins in back to back Stanley Cup finals, and watching something that Mario did that didn't even result in a goal, but was as spectacular as anything I'd ever seen him do. He had just finished dominating another playoffs, and about to win another Conn Smythe. It was the last game of the finals against the Blackhawks. He found himself by himself in front of the net, to Hasek's right with the puck. The puck just somehow came to him as it so often did. In that moment, it was just him and Belfour, no one else around. He fakes a forehand shot, cuts to the right and -- all in one motion -- drops the puck between his legs to a penguin who was just behind him that not even the camera men has picked up -- and somehow this other Penguin missed a wide open net with Hasek sprawled out of position. It was something only two players in the world could have done, and that magic was his that night.

Anyone else miss these guys as much as I do? Any other memories you wish to share?



Hasek - Belfour - Hasek... Even two goalies couldn't help the Blackhawks against Mario Lemieux!

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04-04-2013, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Yamaguchi View Post
Hasek - Belfour - Hasek... Even two goalies couldn't help the Blackhawks against Mario Lemieux!
You beat me to it! Yeah, I realized I used both goalie's names after the fact.

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04-04-2013, 10:15 PM
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eddytheeagle20
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i was born in 92 so by the time i can remember Wayne was already retired and mario had just come out of retirement and was a shadow of his former self. so the players i got to watch in their prime that i got to see the majority of their careers was sundin, sakic forsberg selanne and probally the best player of my life period is a toss up between lidstrom and jagr. i would love to have been born 20 years earlier so i could have watched the greatest era in hockey

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04-04-2013, 10:32 PM
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The way RNH, Hall and Eberele schooled the Canucks last Saturday reminded me of many Edmonton Vancouver games were Vancouver just couldn't compete with the Oilers skill set.

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04-05-2013, 12:19 AM
  #7
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Of course. The NHL is in a similar era to the NBA. The NBA is in the post-Jordan era and the greatest post-Jordan players such as Shaq, Duncan, and Kobe are retired or close to it.

The NHL is in the post Gretzky/Lemieux era and many of the greatest recent players such as Bourque, Lidstrom, Hasek, Jagr, Chelios, and Sakic are retired or close to it.

You can tell yourself that the younger players such as Stamkos and Karlsson will be as good, but the hunger and the mental and physical toughness of their seniors may be gone forever.

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04-05-2013, 12:46 AM
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Of course. The NHL is in a similar era to the NBA. The NBA is in the post-Jordan era and the greatest post-Jordan players such as Shaq, Duncan, and Kobe are retired or close to it.

The NHL is in the post Gretzky/Lemieux era and many of the greatest recent players such as Bourque, Lidstrom, Hasek, Jagr, Chelios, and Sakic are retired or close to it.

You can tell yourself that the younger players such as Stamkos and Karlsson will be as good, but the hunger and the mental and physical toughness of their seniors may be gone forever.
I think a lot of us miss them, judging from the number of Gretzky/Lemieux threads that come up on here.

One of my favorite Gretzky moments was his OT goal against the Flames. Short handed, coming down the wing, and just blew the puck by the goalie (Vernon?) with an absolutely perfect shot. He also had some sick blind backhanded passes in playoff games (one against Chicago on their way to being swept by the Islanders that went cross ice to Kurri, one against the Flyers in a cup win that went to Coffey). He had some huge playoff moments.

Growing up just outside Edmonton I got to see a lot of their games. I wasn't as lucky with Lemieux, but one of my favorite Lemieux moments that I did see was him beating Bourque and practically carrying him on his back all the way to the net as he beat the goaltender as well. One of the greatest Dmen in history, and Lemieux took him to school.

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04-05-2013, 01:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tazzy19 View Post
In light of all the Gretzky vs Lemieux vs Crosby (don't ask me how on the latter name) threads, I thought it would be nice to have a thread celebrating Wayne & Mario. I now realize how lucky I was to have been a hockey fan during the late 80s and early 90s when these two were putting on shows on a nightly basis. I want this NOT to be a Wayne vs. Mario thread, but rather more of reminiscing thread about the most amazing things you remember them doing on the ice.

Mine was watching the Penguins in back to back Stanley Cup finals, and watching something that Mario did that didn't even result in a goal, but was as spectacular as anything I'd ever seen him do. He had just finished dominating another playoffs, and about to win another Conn Smythe. It was the last game of the finals against the Blackhawks. He found himself by himself in front of the net, to Hasek's right with the puck. The puck just somehow came to him as it so often did. In that moment, it was just him and Hasek, no one else around. He fakes a forehand shot, cuts to the right and -- all in one motion -- drops the puck between his legs to a penguin who was just behind him that not even the camera men had picked up -- and somehow this other Penguin missed a wide open net with Hasek sprawled out of position. It was something only two players in the world could have done, and that magic was his that night.

Anyone else miss these guys as much as I do? Any other memories you wish to share?
Absolutely! From 83-84 through 92-93 was the most entertaining hockey I've ever watched. I really hate it when posters who were weened on the DPE disparage the Gretzky era.

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04-05-2013, 02:49 PM
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Hasek - Belfour - Hasek... Even two goalies couldn't help the Blackhawks against Mario Lemieux!
I remember Hasek stopping Lemieux on a couple of breakaways that year. I heard that Lemieux begged the Pens to get him, but they already had Barasso, so Hasek ended up in Buffalo. The rest is history.

The next year Lemieux finally beat Hasek on breakaway and he acted like it is the biggest goal he ever scored.

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04-05-2013, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by tazzy19 View Post
In light of all the Gretzky vs Lemieux vs Crosby (don't ask me how on the latter name) threads, I thought it would be nice to have a thread celebrating Wayne & Mario. I now realize how lucky I was to have been a hockey fan during the late 80s and early 90s when these two were putting on shows on a nightly basis. I want this NOT to be a Wayne vs. Mario thread, but rather more of reminiscing thread about the most amazing things you remember them doing on the ice.

Mine was watching the Penguins in back to back Stanley Cup finals, and watching something that Mario did that didn't even result in a goal, but was as spectacular as anything I'd ever seen him do. He had just finished dominating another playoffs, and about to win another Conn Smythe. It was the last game of the finals against the Blackhawks. He found himself by himself in front of the net, to Hasek's right with the puck. The puck just somehow came to him as it so often did. In that moment, it was just him and Hasek, no one else around. He fakes a forehand shot, cuts to the right and -- all in one motion -- drops the puck between his legs to a penguin who was just behind him that not even the camera men had picked up -- and somehow this other Penguin missed a wide open net with Hasek sprawled out of position. It was something only two players in the world could have done, and that magic was his that night.

Anyone else miss these guys as much as I do? Any other memories you wish to share?
What I miss most about that era is that it looser. Today, everything is measured, organized and optimized, analyzed to death by a million media sources. Players train to death, eat special foods, teams use advanced metrics, computer analyze, study video, etc etc. The NHL, like so much of the modern world, has turned into a version of Walmart, squeezing out all the inefficiencies but also all the spontaneity and fun.

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04-05-2013, 03:52 PM
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Big Phil
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Of course. The NHL is in a similar era to the NBA. The NBA is in the post-Jordan era and the greatest post-Jordan players such as Shaq, Duncan, and Kobe are retired or close to it.

The NHL is in the post Gretzky/Lemieux era and many of the greatest recent players such as Bourque, Lidstrom, Hasek, Jagr, Chelios, and Sakic are retired or close to it.

You can tell yourself that the younger players such as Stamkos and Karlsson will be as good, but the hunger and the mental and physical toughness of their seniors may be gone forever.
I think right now we know how their careers turned out and especially guys like us who saw them play it is hard to say that someone like Stamkos will end up like Bossy, etc. I am not big on hyperbole. I prefer seeing what a player will do rather than assuming and giving him credit for something he hasn't done yet. When a player is as good as a superstar from a past era, we know it and appreciate it.

I'll agree the 1980s and 1990s up until about 1996 or 1997 was a great time for hockey and if anything I think it is something we can look back on with nostalgia in a way. No social media back then, nothing. Somehow, we still survived and were able to follow the game.

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04-05-2013, 04:35 PM
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Since BP mentioned how social media has come to rule our lives, one of the things I miss most about the 99 and 66 era and all eras before is how we used our imagination when we listened to a game of the radio. For you youngsters out there, a radio is a box with sound. We did not get to see every game on a nightly basis, nor the highlights of every game. Sometimes all we had was the boxscore in the paper and you had to used your imagination. A certain mythology often surrounded our hockey and sports heroes, a reverence created by our minds and hearts along with a distance that got in between us and the player and their personal lives. Nowadays, we hear Hartnell tweeting about his ex and players personal lives are as much in our living room as their game. I remember Gretzky scoring the 5 goals he needed to reach 50 in 39. The game was not on TV, at least in Manitoba. We waited to see the hockey highlights on the local news cast, of which they usually devoted less than 5 minutes to. There were no 24 hour sports networks back then. The mystique has disappeared.

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04-05-2013, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by LeBlondeDemon10 View Post
Since BP mentioned how social media has come to rule our lives, one of the things I miss most about the 99 and 66 era and all eras before is how we used our imagination when we listened to a game of the radio. For you youngsters out there, a radio is a box with sound. We did not get to see every game on a nightly basis, nor the highlights of every game. Sometimes all we had was the boxscore in the paper and you had to used your imagination. A certain mythology often surrounded our hockey and sports heroes, a reverence created by our minds and hearts along with a distance that got in between us and the player and their personal lives. Nowadays, we hear Hartnell tweeting about his ex and players personal lives are as much in our living room as their game. I remember Gretzky scoring the 5 goals he needed to reach 50 in 39. The game was not on TV, at least in Manitoba. We waited to see the hockey highlights on the local news cast, of which they usually devoted less than 5 minutes to. There were no 24 hour sports networks back then. The mystique has disappeared.
Before the real boom of good internet in Sweden i just used to follow the box-scores in the daily papers and occasionally they would send some footage at the sportnews about NHL, which mostly included Detroit, Forsberg and Sundin.

I also collected Hockey-cards and traded them with friends and we also created value around certain players like Dallas Drake. We also used to play the videogames so we know about most of the players but yet didn't see games regulary. So that's where the imagination kicked in.

I'm unfortunately too young to have been able to see Gretzky and Lemieux dominate the game. There is fortunately videofootage out there nowadays. But whenever i'm boored i just watch some videofootage of Hasek or my hero when i grew up, Sergei Fedorov.

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04-05-2013, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by SatanwasaSlovak View Post
Before the real boom of good internet in Sweden i just used to follow the box-scores in the daily papers and occasionally they would send some footage at the sportnews about NHL, which mostly included Detroit, Forsberg and Sundin.

I also collected Hockey-cards and traded them with friends and we also created value around certain players like Dallas Drake. We also used to play the videogames so we know about most of the players but yet didn't see games regulary. So that's where the imagination kicked in.

I'm unfortunately too young to have been able to see Gretzky and Lemieux dominate the game. There is fortunately videofootage out there nowadays. But whenever i'm boored i just watch some videofootage of Hasek or my hero when i grew up, Sergei Fedorov.


I can see you are showing a good taste and understanding who is who in the coolest game on earth.


Was Bob Nystrom popular in Sweden?

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04-05-2013, 06:36 PM
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I can see you are showing a good taste and understanding who is who in the coolest game on earth.
From the beginning i liked him because he looked cool on a hockey-card.


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Was Bob Nystrom popular in Sweden?
Don't know, hope there is some other more involved swedish member who answers that because i'm also eager to hear about it.

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04-05-2013, 09:11 PM
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Big Phil
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Originally Posted by LeBlondeDemon10 View Post
Since BP mentioned how social media has come to rule our lives, one of the things I miss most about the 99 and 66 era and all eras before is how we used our imagination when we listened to a game of the radio. For you youngsters out there, a radio is a box with sound. We did not get to see every game on a nightly basis, nor the highlights of every game. Sometimes all we had was the boxscore in the paper and you had to used your imagination. A certain mythology often surrounded our hockey and sports heroes, a reverence created by our minds and hearts along with a distance that got in between us and the player and their personal lives. Nowadays, we hear Hartnell tweeting about his ex and players personal lives are as much in our living room as their game. I remember Gretzky scoring the 5 goals he needed to reach 50 in 39. The game was not on TV, at least in Manitoba. We waited to see the hockey highlights on the local news cast, of which they usually devoted less than 5 minutes to. There were no 24 hour sports networks back then. The mystique has disappeared.
That's true. There was still Sportscenter though which helped a lot. But really, that was it. You lived and died with Hockey News magazines, boxscores and Sportscenter highlights. If you didn't see the highlights at night, well, too bad you had to wait until morning. Things weren't on Youtube 5 minutes after they happened. And that was..........what, 10 years ago? Things have changed. It came to my realization the other day when I was watching the Toronto Blue Jays 1993 World Series win that the 1990s were 20 years ago. That is just hard to believe. I can remember CDs and VHS tapes were state of the art. If you wanted to videotape a game you popped in a tape and recorded. I still to this day have a lot of VHS tapes from older games. By "older" I mean the 1990s.

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