HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

are inline skates incapable of quick stops and sharp turns?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
03-27-2013, 06:43 PM
  #1
JohnZ622
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 41
vCash: 500
are inline skates incapable of quick stops and sharp turns?

I'm thinking of playing more roller hockey to save money. But rollerblading just feels a lot more bulkier to me and I'm unable to make quick stops and sharp turns. Even when I watch professional roller players (MLRH), the game seems slower than ice and most players make big turns rather than stopping at the corner.

JohnZ622 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-27-2013, 06:58 PM
  #2
Wilch
Unregistered User
 
Wilch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Under your bed
Country: Taiwan
Posts: 10,146
vCash: 50
I don't know about stops since I can't do a hockey stop on inline skates, but turns you definitely can't turn as tight as ice. If you get too low you'll end up blowing a tire and sliding.

Wilch is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
03-27-2013, 07:19 PM
  #3
Mantha Poodoo
Playoff Beard
 
Mantha Poodoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 3,907
vCash: 500
I'm pretty experienced on inlines and, well, bad on blades. However, even being garbage on ice I can still turn sharper... as the previous poster notes you eventually just blow a tire. Can turn sharper and sharp at faster speeds easier on ice.

Stops can still be done quickly on inlines, but you're going to use different techniques and, in my opinion, you need to be stronger on your legs. That said, the mistake a lot of people make on inlines at fast is trying too hard to break; you need a feather touch or you're gonna cause way too much friction way too fast and go flying. Best advice I'd have is to find some instructional vids on youtube or such for inline braking.

Mantha Poodoo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
03-27-2013, 07:20 PM
  #4
SaintTavares
Registered User
 
SaintTavares's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 633
vCash: 500
Im sure they can be done, I've seen a friend of mine do some nice stops on them, but it's not something you can do continually. You would destroy your wheels and go through them ridiculously fast.

SaintTavares is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-27-2013, 07:43 PM
  #5
JohnZ622
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 41
vCash: 500
It just seems that inline games are not as exciting as the ice ones. Not sure if it's due to the lower level of play or technical limitation of the equipment & surface.

JohnZ622 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-27-2013, 08:50 PM
  #6
JR97
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 131
vCash: 500
I used to be able to turn just as sharp and make quick stops. not as quick as ice, but quick. It all depended on the surface. If I was on sport court, I went with the grippiest wheel I could get. I don't recall the duramoter. It's been years. They were orange. I also rockered the front wheel on a HL chassis. On my straight wheel chassis, I rockered the front and rear.

JR97 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-27-2013, 09:27 PM
  #7
silkyjohnson50*
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 9,183
vCash: 500
I mainly play roller in outdoor rinks, where the surface isn't nearly as smooth as in indoor inline rink. I've learned to be able to stop and cut on a dime, but your skates will pay for it. As a lefty I typically turn hard from right to left, so the inside of my right skate really grinds against the surface. As a result, the inside part of the chassis by the front two wheels wear down quickly.. To the point where I have to buy new blades every 1.5-2 years because I'm afraid the wheel will eventually fall out when I'm playing.

silkyjohnson50* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-27-2013, 10:38 PM
  #8
ChrisNI
Registered User
 
ChrisNI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Orillia
Country: Canada
Posts: 809
vCash: 50
As above, it's possible it just a lot more practice than ice.

You wheels definitely pay for it too!

ChrisNI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-27-2013, 10:41 PM
  #9
Eisen
Registered User
 
Eisen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Eugene
Country: Germany
Posts: 7,465
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Wheeled Winger View Post
I'm pretty experienced on inlines and, well, bad on blades. However, even being garbage on ice I can still turn sharper... as the previous poster notes you eventually just blow a tire. Can turn sharper and sharp at faster speeds easier on ice.

Stops can still be done quickly on inlines, but you're going to use different techniques and, in my opinion, you need to be stronger on your legs. That said, the mistake a lot of people make on inlines at fast is trying too hard to break; you need a feather touch or you're gonna cause way too much friction way too fast and go flying. Best advice I'd have is to find some instructional vids on youtube or such for inline braking.
Signed.

Eisen is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
03-28-2013, 12:36 PM
  #10
Bengerm77
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 32
vCash: 500
As a roller hockey player, I can do faster stops than on ice. Turns, meh, but stopping can be done on a dime.


Last edited by Trebek: 03-28-2013 at 12:48 PM. Reason: Flaming
Bengerm77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-28-2013, 02:38 PM
  #11
LarryO
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Montreal
Country: Canada
Posts: 439
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnZ622 View Post
I'm thinking of playing more roller hockey to save money. But rollerblading just feels a lot more bulkier to me and I'm unable to make quick stops and sharp turns. Even when I watch professional roller players (MLRH), the game seems slower than ice and most players make big turns rather than stopping at the corner.
But just because roller hockey is not exactly the same as ice hockey is not a reason to avoid playing it. It's different but can be as much fun.

LarryO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-28-2013, 03:53 PM
  #12
iamjs
Unregistered User
 
iamjs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 9,605
vCash: 500
Yes, but you will burn through wheels quickly. When I was playing 3-4 days a week, I was going through wheels monthly, and that's with regular rotation and wearing wheeling down to the center hubs (something I would not recommend.)

iamjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-28-2013, 04:05 PM
  #13
Vip
Rieder Support Team
 
Vip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Country: Mexico
Posts: 14,072
vCash: 500
You can. I do all the time.

However, you put yourself at risk of breaking an ankle. It also wears out your wheels really fast.

Vip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-31-2013, 06:03 PM
  #14
titaniumexpose
HF Pens:Got Future?
 
titaniumexpose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fjord Chity, PA
Country: United States
Posts: 942
vCash: 500
It seems like you'd be able to turn a little more sharply if you set up your wheels to mimic the rocker of ice hockey skates. The less surface area making contact with the ground, the less friction to resist it.

titaniumexpose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-31-2013, 09:42 PM
  #15
octopi
Registered User
 
octopi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 31,415
vCash: 500
When i was roller blading, I made up a hockey type stop: I'd turn and do a low jump with my skates together similar to a hockey stop. Worked pretty decent, of course I wasn't usually going overly fast.

octopi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-01-2013, 02:08 AM
  #16
Sean Garrity
Shut up and Dance!
 
Sean Garrity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: The Nut
Country: United States
Posts: 9,764
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by octopi View Post
When i was roller blading, I made up a hockey type stop: I'd turn and do a low jump with my skates together similar to a hockey stop. Worked pretty decent, of course I wasn't usually going overly fast.
I do the exact same thing, but as you mentioned when I am going fast I am too afraid to tear an ACL or something so I never try it. I call it a "jump stop" and get made fun of quite frequently lol but, if I'm under control I can stop quite easily.

Sean Garrity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-01-2013, 09:35 AM
  #17
**** Farise
Registered User
 
**** Farise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,790
vCash: 500
I've played pretty competitive inline hockey on sport court surfaces. Stopping is definitely possible, even at high speeds. You can make sharp turns up to a certain speed, after that sharp turns become pretty impossible without having your skates slide out from under you. In my experience, it takes more leg strength to stop during inline hockey than it does in ice. You really need to press your feet down into the court to get the wheels to grip and stop your momentum, compared to just knowing how to use your edges to stop on ice.

I haven't had the problem with destroying wheels that several other people have mentioned. But I guess it's possible most of them are playing outdoor on concrete. I'm almost 190 lbs and do a lot of hard stops while playing indoors...and my wheels always last over a year.

**** Farise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-01-2013, 10:00 AM
  #18
Ozz
Registered User
 
Ozz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Hockeytown
Country: United States
Posts: 6,968
vCash: 500
Back as a 150lb. teen I used to be able to stop on a dime while playing inline. Lots of us could. Our wheels got eaten up here and there but not too much. We played on wood or sport court, FWIW. Doing power stops/slides like that on asphalt or concrete will definitely kill your wheels, not to mention it's not nearly as 'easy' to stop hard and properly either. I ran a full rocker back then, too.

Nowadays at 210lbs. I run Rink Rats and stop as hard/quickly as I can, and I still don't have any issues w/wheel survival. The wheel quality is better, but the rink we play on isn't as grippy as the wood either so I'm sure both of those lend to my experience.

Anyway, it's a technique that differs from ice stops.

Ozz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-08-2013, 07:05 PM
  #19
RangersAM99
Registered User
 
RangersAM99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Jersey
Country: United States
Posts: 1,944
vCash: 500
it can be done just as well as it can be done in ice, you just have to trust yourself that you won't eat ****, that and have a soft set of wheels

RangersAM99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:13 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2015 All Rights Reserved.