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Old
04-11-2013, 01:30 PM
  #26
Sharpshooter1
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One would hope in time we could start colonizing the Moon and Mars etc. If we lived much longer lives, and were fit physically and mentally for most of that time, travelling long distance in a spaceship could become viable.
That would be an idea.

Although it's not just travel that makes it fraught for humans to travel in space, but that's for another thread i'm sure.

I'm all for colonization of our solar system.

Hmm...Agent Smith was right...we are like a virus.

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04-11-2013, 03:24 PM
  #27
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Who wouldn't want to live forever. I'm bummed I can't

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04-11-2013, 06:11 PM
  #28
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I would take a couple of thousands extra years elvish style for sure. But the condition is that at least 3/4 of it must be physical prime age (or close too). Would be pointless to live 1000 years in full health and then another 1000 while being old (Like let's say 60+ of normal human age).

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Old
04-11-2013, 06:31 PM
  #29
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That's kind of how I feel. If you are transferring your "consciousness" or knowledge into a synthetic brain, is it still really you?
To me, it wouldn't be much more then a video recording. It's an imprint of you, but you're not alive.

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04-11-2013, 09:06 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevanston View Post
That said, just like any big science project, keep throwing time and effort into it (money helps too) and who knows what could happen!
I don't know why they'd waste their money on something as technically complicated like that when they'd probably see tangible results much sooner if they spent their money researching biological immortality.

Since plenty of species have much longer life-spans than humans and some species (like lobsters) show little signs of ageing and might not die of old age at all, it's not too far fetched to think that science could slow human ageing significantly and extend our lifetimes greatly, even if true biological immortality might be an unreachable goal.


Last edited by Franck: 04-11-2013 at 09:20 PM.
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Old
04-12-2013, 06:58 AM
  #31
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I don't know why they'd waste their money on something as technically complicated like that when they'd probably see tangible results much sooner if they spent their money researching biological immortality.

Since plenty of species have much longer life-spans than humans and some species (like lobsters) show little signs of ageing and might not die of old age at all, it's not too far fetched to think that science could slow human ageing significantly and extend our lifetimes greatly, even if true biological immortality might be an unreachable goal.
There are people doing this. I remember reading an article about a guy who is working on "curing death" on a biological level. Who know with advancements in nanotech etc. this might one day be possible. Does it mean you will be immortal? Probably not but living 200-300 years could very well become possible.

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Old
04-12-2013, 11:50 AM
  #32
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There are people doing this. I remember reading an article about a guy who is working on "curing death" on a biological level. Who know with advancements in nanotech etc. this might one day be possible. Does it mean you will be immortal? Probably not but living 200-300 years could very well become possible.
By any chance did it happen to be Aubrey de Grey? I've read about him before, some of it seems realistic, some not so much. Plus the guy just looks like a quack.

But when you consider it is estimated that 50% of all children born nowadays will live to be over 100 years old, I could definitely see a huge increase in lifespan given the rate medical science is improving.

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04-12-2013, 12:41 PM
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanwb View Post
By any chance did it happen to be Aubrey de Grey? I've read about him before, some of it seems realistic, some not so much. Plus the guy just looks like a quack.

But when you consider it is estimated that 50% of all children born nowadays will live to be over 100 years old, I could definitely see a huge increase in lifespan given the rate medical science is improving.
Indeed it is, that beard of his is hard to forget!!

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Old
04-12-2013, 10:38 PM
  #34
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By any chance did it happen to be Aubrey de Grey? I've read about him before, some of it seems realistic, some not so much. Plus the guy just looks like a quack.

But when you consider it is estimated that 50% of all children born nowadays will live to be over 100 years old, I could definitely see a huge increase in lifespan given the rate medical science is improving.
Is that worldwide or only in particular countries/regions?

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04-12-2013, 11:49 PM
  #35
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I don't know why they'd waste their money on something as technically complicated like that when they'd probably see tangible results much sooner if they spent their money researching biological immortality.

Since plenty of species have much longer life-spans than humans and some species (like lobsters) show little signs of ageing and might not die of old age at all, it's not too far fetched to think that science could slow human ageing significantly and extend our lifetimes greatly, even if true biological immortality might be an unreachable goal.
I was going to mention lobsters - it's some crazy ****. I don't think they get cancer either, do they?

I'm pretty sure I've also heard them referred to as being immortal as long as a predator/person doesn't eat them or they don't get killed in a freak car accident or something along those lines.

I seem to remember a documentary that mentioned them - it wasn't focused on immortality - more along the lines of having your 65+ years be healthy, fun for everyone instead of a few winners of the genetic lottery.

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04-13-2013, 12:24 AM
  #36
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Isn't some cancer cell from the 50s still undergoing perpetual mitosis? Here's a concept: a species completely comprised of cancerous properties, all working in harmony. Immortal?

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04-13-2013, 09:02 AM
  #37
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Is that worldwide or only in particular countries/regions?
Right now? Just the wealthier nations you would expect something like that from. But with the way medical science is advancing and becoming more efficient and cheaper every day, it's not long until developing countries begin to catch up.

Ideally we would eventually reach a point where we have some sort of a free worldwide healthcare system. At least we would if I ran the zoo.

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04-13-2013, 06:21 PM
  #38
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Right now? Just the wealthier nations you would expect something like that from. But with the way medical science is advancing and becoming more efficient and cheaper every day, it's not long until developing countries begin to catch up.

Ideally we would eventually reach a point where we have some sort of a free worldwide healthcare system. At least we would if I ran the zoo.
Oh, I see. I figured 3rd world countries were too poor or had limited healthcare to prevent it. I figured 1st world countries were too fat to make it that far

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Old
04-14-2013, 09:28 AM
  #39
Franck
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I was going to mention lobsters - it's some crazy ****. I don't think they get cancer either, do they?

I'm pretty sure I've also heard them referred to as being immortal as long as a predator/person doesn't eat them or they don't get killed in a freak car accident or something along those lines.

I seem to remember a documentary that mentioned them - it wasn't focused on immortality - more along the lines of having your 65+ years be healthy, fun for everyone instead of a few winners of the genetic lottery.
Yeah, lobsters die from injury, disease and predation but apparently not from old age. If neither of those occur, they'll keep on living (and growing) in perpetuity.

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Old
04-14-2013, 12:37 PM
  #40
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More on the lobster, interesting stuff.

Quote:
Decline is an accepted part of old age for most people, even for those still searching for the fountain of youth. We expect the same in our pets and in the flies that buzz around us, albeit at a different rate. So why are lobsters different? A study conducted in 1998 showed that lobsters maintain telomerase activation late in life. But before we explain that, let's talk briefly about cell division.
Telomeres are like caps or sheathes that encase the ends of chromosomes. When cells divide, telomeres get shorter. When telomeres get to a certain length, they can no longer protect chromosomes and the chromosomes start to suffer damage. The number of cell divisions before damage sets in is called the Hayflick limit.
Telomerase is an enzyme that adds length to telomeres, extending their life span. In humans, telomerase is abundant in embryonic stem cells and then declines later in life. This is actually a good thing because when cells re-activate telomerase after reaching the Hayflick limit, they become cancerous (in other words, they don't die when they're supposed to). The downside is that cells with short telomeres weaken and die, so we eventually die, too.
In humans, telomerase levels decline later in life and are only found in some types of tissue, but in lobsters, telomerase is found in all types of tissue. That likely accounts for lobsters' ability to grow throughout their lives. And because lobsters' skeletons are on the outside and the molting process allows them to periodically shed their exoskeletons in favor of a new, larger one, their constant growth isn't a problem. With a steady, evenly distributed supply of telomerase, lobsters don't approach the Hayflick limit, which means that their cells stay pristine, young and dividing.
The dual role of telomerase in keeping cells healthy and in cancer growth means that it's an important area of research for both anti-aging and cancer treatments. Further study of lobsters may teach us more about their longevity, how long they can actually live and what that knowledge may mean for human health.
http://science.howstuffworks.com/zoo...nd-lobster.htm

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Old
04-17-2013, 03:06 AM
  #41
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It'd be crazy to get a Lobster as a pet when you're a kid, then when you die of old age at 100 years old, the last thing you see is the same pet Lobster laughing at you from his tank.

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Old
04-17-2013, 07:47 AM
  #42
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It'd be crazy to get a Lobster as a pet when you're a kid, then when you die of old age at 100 years old, the last thing you see is the same pet Lobster laughing at you from his tank.
Easier to do is get a large parrot. Found an interesting list of life spans for various species in years. These are known "maximums" based on various sources and research not sure how accurate they are but most seem right. Some of pretty interesting.

African Grey Parrot 73 Amazon Parrot 104
American Alligator 56 American Box Turtle 123
American Newt 3 American Toad 15
Angleworm 15 Anole 3
Ant --Queen 3 Ant -- Worker 1/2
Banksian Cockatoo 29.3 Bat 24
Bear 40 Beaver 20
Bee -- Queen 5 Bee -- Worker 1
Binturong 18 Blackbird(redwinged) 15.8
Boa Constrictor 23 Budgerigar 29
Bull 28 Bull Frog 16
Bull Snake 18 Caiman 28
Camel 50 Canada Goose 24.3
Canary 24 Canvasback duck 22.4
Capybara 12 Carp 100
Cat 25 Chicken 14
Chinchilla 20 Civet 13
Cockatiel 35 Common Goldeneye 14.3
Congo Eel 27 Conure 22.5
Cottonmouth Mocassin 21 Cow 22
Crocodile 45 Deer 26.8
Dog 22 Domestic Pigeon 18
Donkey 45 Eclectus Parrot 30
Egyptian Goose 25.5 Elephant 70
Fence Lizard 4 Ferret 12
Flying Squirrel 14 Fox 14
Galah 27.2 Galapagos Land Tortoise 193
Gerbil 5 Goat 15
Golden Hamster 4 Gouldian finch 14
Grey Cheeked Parrot 15 Grey Squirrel 20
Grouse (blue) 14 Guinea Pig 8
Hare 10 Hellbender 29
Hippopotamus 45 Hog 18
Horse 40 Kangaroo 9
Koala 8 Leopard Frog 6
Lion 35 Macaw 64
Mallard 29 Mongoose 12
Mouse 4 Muscrat 6
Mudpuppy 9 Mynah 25
Norwegian Rat 4 Nutria 15
Opossum 4 Ox 20
Painted Turtle 11 Pea Fowl 23.2
Pheasant 27 Pig -- wild 25
Pionus Parrot 40 Platypus 10
Porcupine 20 Prarie Dog 10
Quail (California) 6.9 Rabbit 9
Rainbow Lorikeet 15 Rat Snake 23
Rattlesnake 22 Red Eared Turtle 30.5
Ring-necked Duck 20.4 Rhinoceros 40
Rosella 15.4 Sheep 15
Snapping Turtle 57 South African Clawed Toad 15
Sulphur Crested Cockatoo 80Superb Parrot 36
Tapir 30 Tasmanian Tiger 7
Teal 22.3 Tiger 22
Tiger Salamander 11 Toucan 20
Tree Frog 14 Trumpeter Swan 33
Wood Duck 22.5 Wombat 15
Wolf 18 Woodchuck 15
Zebra Finch 12

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Old
04-17-2013, 08:21 AM
  #43
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Got me interested at looking at ages some animals live until and we humans are spring chickens as compared to some species out there

Geoducks
First on the list are these large saltwater clams that are native to the Puget Sound and have been known to live for at least 160 years. They are characterized by their long 'necks', or siphons, which can grow to over 1 meter long.

Tuataras
The word "dinosaur" is commonly used to describe an old person, but when it refers to a tuataras, the term is as literal as it is metaphorical. The two species of tuatara alive today are the only surviving members of an order which flourished about 200 million years ago — they are living dinosaurs. They are also among the longest-lived vertebrates on Earth, with some individuals living for anywhere between 100 and 200 years.

Lamellibrachia tube worms
These colorful deep sea creatures are tube worms (L. luymesi) that live along hydrocarbon vents on the ocean floor. They have been known to live 170 years, but many scientists believe there may be some that have lived for more than 250 years.

he red sea urchin or Strongylocentrotus franciscanus is found only in the Pacific Ocean, primarily along the West Coast of North America. It lives in shallow, sometimes rocky, waters from the low-tide line down to to 90 meters, but they stay out of extremely wavy areas. They crawl along the ocean floor using their spines as stilts. If you discover one, remember to respect your elders — some specimens are more than 200 years old.

Bowhead whales
Also known as the Arctic whale, the bowhead is by far the longest living mammal on Earth. Some bowhead whales have been found with the tips of ivory spears still lodged in their flesh from failed attempts by whalers 200 years ago. The oldest known bowhead whale was at least 211 years old.

Koi
Koi are an ornamental, domesticated variety of the common carp. The are common in artificial rock pools and decorative ponds. Amazingly, some varieties are capable of living more than 200 years. The oldest known koi was Hanako, a fish that died at the age of 226 on July 7, 1977.

Tortoises
Tortoises are considered the longest living vertebrates on Earth. One of their oldest known representatives was Harriet, a Galápagos tortoise that died of heart failure at the age of 175 years in June 2006 at a zoo owned by the late Steve Irwin. Harriet was considered the last living representative of Darwin's epic voyage on the HMS Beagle. An Aldabra giant tortoise named Adwaita died at the rumored age of 250 in March 2006.

Ocean quahog
The ocean quahog (Arctica islandica) is a species of clam that is exploited commercially. Researchers have interpreted the dark concentric rings or bands on the shell as annual marks, much like a tree has rings. Some collected specimens have been calculated to be more than 400 years old.

Antarctic sponge
Perhaps due to the extremely low temperatures of the Antarctic Ocean, this immobile creature has an extremely slow growth rate. Some estimate the oldest known specimens are 1,550 years old.

Turritopsis nutricula jellyfish
This species of jellyfish might be the only animal in the world to have truly discovered the fountain of youth. Since it is capable of cycling from a mature adult stage to an immature polyp stage and back again, there may be no natural limit to its life span. Because they are able to bypass death, the number of individuals is spiking. "We are looking at a worldwide silent invasion," says Dr. Maria Miglietta of the Smithsonian Tropical Marine Institute.

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Old
04-17-2013, 01:26 PM
  #44
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Old
04-17-2013, 02:27 PM
  #45
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I had never heard of that jellyfish before - that's amazing!

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