HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Notices

The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Defenceman Advice

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
04-18-2013, 09:57 PM
  #1
4040tee
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 63
vCash: 500
Defenceman Advice

Hey guys I made my school varsity ball hockey team recently as a defenceman and in my first game I ran into some serious trouble.

a) when i get the ball i feel like a deer in the headlights i have no idea who to pass it to
b) i cant make hard passes without them rising
c) when the defensive team is cycling i have trouble beating them on the boards because i try to stay towards my net and play it safe

my stickwork is really good and i rarely get beat one-on-one but i need advice moving the ball out of my zone and being assertive with it

4040tee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-19-2013, 01:58 AM
  #2
Oh_so_saad
Registered User
 
Oh_so_saad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Seattle
Country: United States
Posts: 597
vCash: 500
Watch some videos of YouTube of drew doughty, and nick leddy

Oh_so_saad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-19-2013, 09:12 AM
  #3
leftwinger37
Registered User
 
leftwinger37's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: "Great Lakes State"
Country: United States
Posts: 382
vCash: 500
It sounds like your problem is more psychological than it is in your technique. Try to think of yourself more as the quarterback or the master of the chessboard rather than the last line of defense or the guy can't screw up because it will result in a goal.

This may sound silly, but you would be surprised at how much it helps: Try visualization. You can actually train your brain to perform in pressure situations by visualizing yourself being successful in these situations. Make this part of your pregame routine or do it before you go to sleep at night. Visualize yourself making perfect outlet passes. Picture yourself being tough down low against the cycle game. If you do this routinely, you become less anxious in these situations and the "mental training" takes over.

Also, focus on your strengths; If you know you're good one on one, trust yourself in those situations and embrace them. Don't focus on what you can't do, just work harder at it.

This advice is free, so take it for what it's worth. If you find that it works and want to explore the topic more, read "Hockey Tough" by Dr. Saul Miller. It explores how to conquer the mental side of the game. Simply put, this book changed my life.

leftwinger37 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-19-2013, 10:59 AM
  #4
esidebill
Registered User
 
esidebill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Long Island, NY
Country: United States
Posts: 365
vCash: 500
Your rising hard passes may be the result in follow-through technique. Try to keep your body low and the toe of the blade low.

esidebill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-19-2013, 12:24 PM
  #5
AIREAYE
Moderator
 
AIREAYE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: China
Posts: 4,545
vCash: 500
As a newer defenceman myself, I really do appreciate that advice leftwinger37 and it makes a lot of sense to me, thanks for the book recommendation as well!

AIREAYE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-19-2013, 01:43 PM
  #6
mistrhanky
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 216
vCash: 500
I am also fairly new to defense and had a lot of the same problems. On top of it, I am big and fairly slow. So, my reaction was to stay inside, try to close down angles, and keep the crease clear. That really did not work though. You have to be complete. In the last few weeks I have realized that part of my problem was that 'last line of defense' mentality. You have to be willing to fail. Charging the corners, charging the boards, trusting that your center will cover the right gaps, it all just has to be done. Now I have started blocking a ton of shots, and even if some fast little bugger smokes me, I can usually still tie him up and get my body in his way enough to disrupt a clean play. My advice would be to try and play smart, but fearless. Also, encourage your teammates to talk. If you communicate well, you will know exactly when you can attack hard and when you need to hold up and cover an angle.

mistrhanky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-19-2013, 02:16 PM
  #7
Jarick
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 25,250
vCash: 500
Check this thread, there are a few links to other threads with TONS of advice.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-19-2013, 02:43 PM
  #8
Lososaurus
Registered User
 
Lososaurus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: California
Posts: 647
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4040tee View Post
a) when i get the ball i feel like a deer in the headlights i have no idea who to pass it to
Although on skates I'd say to be at least gliding, but be moving when you have the ball/puck. If your feet are locked then you're watching the game going on around you. I remember someone saying its a lot easier to go from slow to fast than from stopped to slow. So just by moving you'll be opening up options and a quick step or two can open up more.
edit: More about this, talk to your forwards and coach about where the forwards are looking to go or be during a breakout. I talk to teammates to get a feel for where they're going to be or about going to certain areas where I know I can put the puck safely.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4040tee View Post
b) i cant make hard passes without them rising
Eh, it'll come with practice I wouldn't worry about that so much. Get a similar ball and practice against a brick wall or in some open space with a friend.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4040tee View Post
c) when the defensive team is cycling i have trouble beating them on the boards because i try to stay towards my net and play it safe
I think you're going to have to read the play and the player with the puck better on this one. Basically when you see them go to dump it on the boards hit the boards. Or if they do a D->D pass and your winger reads it right and pressures the pointman as the pass is coming across he'll have few options other than dumping it down the boards or just getting it deep in your defensive zone. So when you see the pass going across, try to figure out what that pointman's options will be before he receives it.


Last edited by Lososaurus: 04-19-2013 at 02:51 PM. Reason: more info
Lososaurus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-20-2013, 02:03 PM
  #9
leftwinger37
Registered User
 
leftwinger37's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: "Great Lakes State"
Country: United States
Posts: 382
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by AIREAYE View Post
As a newer defenceman myself, I really do appreciate that advice leftwinger37 and it makes a lot of sense to me, thanks for the book recommendation as well!
No problem; glad I could help. When I was learning the position, I thought confidence only came through experience. Even after gaining that experience, I was amazed at the impact that visualization, positive thought, and positive reinforcement had on my game. The biggest takeaway from Dr. Miller's book is that these principals are useful not just on the ice, but also in life. Truly a great read.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mistrhanky View Post
I am also fairly new to defense and had a lot of the same problems. On top of it, I am big and fairly slow. So, my reaction was to stay inside, try to close down angles, and keep the crease clear. That really did not work though. You have to be complete. In the last few weeks I have realized that part of my problem was that 'last line of defense' mentality. You have to be willing to fail. Charging the corners, charging the boards, trusting that your center will cover the right gaps, it all just has to be done. Now I have started blocking a ton of shots, and even if some fast little bugger smokes me, I can usually still tie him up and get my body in his way enough to disrupt a clean play. My advice would be to try and play smart, but fearless. Also, encourage your teammates to talk. If you communicate well, you will know exactly when you can attack hard and when you need to hold up and cover an angle.
It sounds like you get it; a lot of people don't. It's easy to just do what's comfortable and not address areas in your game that you're not as confident about, but we're all playing a role out there. If you're not willing to take on everything that your role demands, your teammates can't fully trust you. Believe me, making a mistake while trying your hardest garners more trust and respect than playing it safe. Like Mark Messier always used to say, "There's nowhere to hide out there."

leftwinger37 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-20-2013, 05:34 PM
  #10
MrCraigAnderson
#rooster #classless
 
MrCraigAnderson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Red Deer
Country: Canada
Posts: 8,663
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4040tee View Post
Hey guys I made my school varsity ball hockey team recently as a defenceman and in my first game I ran into some serious trouble.

a) when i get the ball i feel like a deer in the headlights i have no idea who to pass it to
b) i cant make hard passes without them rising
c) when the defensive team is cycling i have trouble beating them on the boards because i try to stay towards my net and play it safe

my stickwork is really good and i rarely get beat one-on-one but i need advice moving the ball out of my zone and being assertive with it
a) before you get the ball, make a decision as to what you will do. make the easy play. A short pass. If the forwards are too ahead of the play, look to your d partner, it should open things up. if there is no easy pass just get it out, you dont wanna turn it over in your zone. as you gain confidence hold onto it longer, look for an open area and go there.

b)a ball is a bit harder than a puck to keep down but watch the follow through. practice one day just passing as hard as you can against a fence or boards or something.

c) read the play, if you see the play developing antcitpate and jump into it to break it up. pick you spots though, pay attention to each players tendencies.

MrCraigAnderson is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
04-20-2013, 05:51 PM
  #11
tikkanen5rings*
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: in your head!
Posts: 11,686
vCash: 500
I have never played ball hockey but here's with I can say.
Assuming it's similar to ice hockey:
a) You have to be calm and keep your head up and try to see the ice.
Worry more, where your team mates are than who's coming at you.
You can't be wondering if the puck is in your blade. If you do, you need to practice on your puck handling.
b)Lean on the pass.
c)Get faster and stronger..

e. You do have to worry about the guy coming after you also, but the main thing is to always be able to keep your head up so you can see what's happening on the ice at all times.
When you master that, it means you're a great puck handler.

tikkanen5rings* is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:57 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2016 All Rights Reserved.