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Brad Symes appreciation thread. RIP

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Old
02-28-2016, 03:31 PM
  #1
Replacement
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Brad Symes appreciation thread. RIP

Brad deserves to have this commemoration here and lots more. A former Oiler draft who never made it as far as his hockey dream but did with his dream to be a firefighter like his dad, which Brad did for 13yrs. Tragically, Brad succumbed to occupational PTSD (I can relate) and severe depression, and taking his life.

http://oilers.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=870952


Brad, seemingly trapped in that "guy world'' theme of not being able to talk about struggles, problems, never let on how much he was impacted by his job. He kept on smiling, with people not knowing what lay behind, what was deep inside, which all people that respond to tragedy, death, disaster, know all too well.

The Oilers are having an information night on PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) tonight at the game and are associated with this cause due to Brad Symes legacy.

A wish for peace for Brad that he didn't have in his later years (he was still so young) and for the people struggling in the light of the cold harsh face of PTSD that often removes all joy and has one relating to, and experiencing death, more than life.
These words really hit me from the article regarding a Soldier returned home;
Quote:
“My husband came back from Afghanistan in 2003 and I noticed that he had changed and we started going through a lot of struggles as a couple,” she said. “Just before he was deployed I had lost a child very late in pregnancy and so I started going through a very deep road of depression myself.”


“Then he was sent overseas for eight months and came back from his deployment. I was starting to get on the right path at that time, but I could see that he came home a very changed man: very short-tempered, very withdrawn, he just didn’t want anything to do with normal life anymore.”
These are so typically the warning signs. But which often take the right, trained, eyes of a loved one to see. many people don't spot it. Individuals suffering PTSD effects often don't.


RIP Brad, condolences to friends and family but such a great thing that this is getting more recognition on behalf of all emergency responders, Military, and I would include crisis responders in that.

These are the real heros imo. People like Brad, and his father that seek out and dedicate to professions that have so many dangers and so much purpose. But that have dangers that until fairly recently were far less recognized.

I hope this thread is considered appropriate to the board. I think the topic while being OT, has a place here, and the Oilers org, to their credit, feel it has a place.

More on Brads PTSD and tragedy.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...ptsd-1.2727271


Last edited by Replacement: 02-28-2016 at 03:49 PM.
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02-28-2016, 05:18 PM
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BlowbyBlow
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Thanks for posting this. I find when I read these stories how little someones worldly value is in relation to someone's value to there family and friends.

This was a man who cared not just for his loved ones but for his community and all the people around him. These are guys from getting to know his story how much they affect and are apart of there workplace in making it a positive and happy place to be when they are there.

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02-28-2016, 05:23 PM
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Philly85
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absolutely tragic story. Heard all about it through some friends who work for the department. Everyone loved him but it's a messed up working environment. Hope more people become aware.

RIP

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02-28-2016, 05:29 PM
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Horrible stuff. And it keeps happening. Firefighters, EMTs, police officers, military servicemen and women...and it often has everything to do with the theme identified by OP: they've generally been programmed to "be tough" and to minimize their experience in order to never been seen as weak, as a failure, or as inadequate among their peers.

I happen to be in the direct service field, working with these types of clients and others that have been traumatized. I like this memorial as it reminds those of us fortunate enough to have never experienced PTSD that it's a different experience that none can ever understand. And kudos to the Oilers org for facilitating awareness to the issue.

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02-28-2016, 06:34 PM
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Mc5RingsAndABeer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dookers9 View Post
Horrible stuff. And it keeps happening. Firefighters, EMTs, police officers, military servicemen and women...and it often has everything to do with the theme identified by OP: they've generally been programmed to "be tough" and to minimize their experience in order to never been seen as weak, as a failure, or as inadequate among their peers.

I happen to be in the direct service field, working with these types of clients and others that have been traumatized. I like this memorial as it reminds those of us fortunate enough to have never experienced PTSD that it's a different experience that none can ever understand. And kudos to the Oilers org for facilitating awareness to the issue.
Yep. It happens to those who aren't programmed to be tough, but they often seek help...while these people suffer in silence.

Awareness and treatment are dramatically improving, but we need to do more on the prevention side of things. People in these professions shouldn't be afraid to ask for a mental health day - it should be as common as a sick day for food poisoning or a bad hangover.

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02-28-2016, 06:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mc5RingsAndABeer View Post
Yep. It happens to those who aren't programmed to be tough, but they often seek help...while these people suffer in silence.

Awareness and treatment are dramatically improving, but we need to do more on the prevention side of things. People in these professions shouldn't be afraid to ask for a mental health day - it should be as common as a sick day for food poisoning or a bad hangover.
A day doesn't do it justice. A week, a month doesn't do it justice. Theres scars due to first responding to trauma that never leave.

Symes for instance responding to a child that drowned in a public swimming pool who could not be resuscitated. Something his parents felt stayed with him the rest of his life as he had children himself.

Sorry, but that respite doesn't capture the depth of related trauma here at all.

That said I do agree there should be job related leave but most employees don't even give a day or a week nonetheless what is required for some healing.

Theres police officers, first responders in Edmonton that a year ago had to respond to a domestic family homicide scene that involved the murder of several innocent children. That's simply something one never gets over. Especially for any parent with their own children seeing that.

No easy solutions. Needs to be a lot of increased understanding though.


Last edited by Replacement: 02-28-2016 at 06:48 PM.
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02-28-2016, 11:40 PM
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Not sure who else went to the game but I won't lie, kinda expected more from the Oilers.

They provided a place card announcing the table dedicated to this charity 5 minutes into the game...and that was it.

The way it was worded I expected maybe a presentation before the game, something a little bigger.

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02-28-2016, 11:44 PM
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Originally Posted by CanmoreMike View Post
Not sure who else went to the game but I won't lie, kinda expected more from the Oilers.

They provided a place card announcing the table dedicated to this charity 5 minutes into the game...and that was it.

The way it was worded I expected maybe a presentation before the game, something a little bigger.
Oh, that's too bad. Would've been nice to have a moment before the anthems and a minute of silence. Mind you whatever the Oilers and the PTSD charity do would have to be with the tacit approval of the parents. Maybe they just wanted a quieter mention.

Thanks for giving me and the board an update as I saw nothing on the telecast and was hoping somebody at the game would update.

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02-29-2016, 12:09 AM
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PTSD is more prevalent in today's society with soldiers returning from combat, but it has always been in the background for Police, Firefighter, Paramedics, Corrections, etc. Good on the Oilers for doing this. Any exposure for this disorder can't hurt. Far too many people in these fields are either told to just suck it up or just internalize it which is not good.

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02-29-2016, 12:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shibumi View Post
PTSD is more prevalent in today's society with soldiers returning from combat, but it has always been in the background for Police, Firefighter, Paramedics, Corrections, etc. Good on the Oilers for doing this. Any exposure for this disorder can't hurt. Far too many people in these fields are either told to just suck it up or just internalize it which is not good.
You're considered "soft" if you miss a shift after a traumatic call. The culture is changing, but these people see the worst of what life has to offer, and they're still commonly expected to chug along as though it's just another day at the office.

Scary stuff.

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02-29-2016, 12:43 AM
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Great post Replacement, very well said.

Condolences to his family and friends and all those deepy affected.

R.I.P Brad

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02-29-2016, 08:02 PM
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mossy joe
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sad, sad story. a really great guy, who always went out of his way to be nice to me and my family.

he also won a memorial cup with portland, with ference as his d-partner.

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