HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The History of Hockey
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The History of Hockey Relive great moments in hockey history and discuss how the game has changed over time.

CNBC Does a Heidi

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
05-03-2013, 01:06 PM
  #1
Peter9
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Los Angeles, USA
Country: United States
Posts: 382
vCash: 500
CNBC Does a Heidi

Dishonorable mention deserved by CNBC, which advertised it would show the opening game in the Senators-Canadiens series Thursday. I along with an unknown number of other fans watched well into the third period of a closely-contested match. With about eight minutes to go and the Senators leading by a single goal, 3-2, CNBC, without any announcement whatsoever, suddenly ended its coverage of the game and switched to the start of the Kings-Blues game. That is the ultimate in disrespect to sports fans. It was unprofessional and unethical. It was also false advertising. After investing more than two hours in the game, we were deprived of its climax.

This is all reminiscent, of course, of the infamous incident in which NBC created a nationwide uproar by switching from the last few minutes of an NFL game to a showing of the film Heidi. That game was voted the most memorable in NFL history at the close of the last century because of the outrage. For those who are too young to remember it first hand, here’s a piece on it in Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidi_Game

CNBC responded to my complaint by saying the time allotted for the Senators-Canadiens game had expired. Unbelievable! That’s a poor explanation to begin with—the same one given in the Heidi incident, by the way—but it becomes ridiculous in the context of the playoffs. Don’t they know that playoff games often go into overtime, that you can’t predict how long they wlll last.

In any event, these telecasters need to learn a lesson. Once you put a game on, you stay with it to the finish. Would it have hurt that bad to put off showing part of the first period of the Kings-Blues game so we could watch the finish of a game we had spent more than two hours watching? It’s obvious CNBC’s NHL playoff coverage cannot be relied on.

I can remember only two other television hockey coverage incidents that were as outrageous, both in international play. One was CBS coverage of a game between NHL All-Stars and the Soviet Union. Madison Square Garden put advertising on the boards for the first time and CBS objected to giving away free advertising to the board advertisers. So it had its cameras go only as high as the low point of the boards on the far side of the ice, which meant the game was unwatchable. The other was a game circa 1987 between Canada and the Soviet Union, when a Los Angeles cable company just shut off the game before it went into overtime. It claimed it was bound by contract to show another program at the time it cut off its coverage. When I complained, the cable company invited me and a friend down to the studio to watch the game on its feed. We took them up on it since they were only a few miles away and made it for the overtime.


Last edited by Peter9: 05-03-2013 at 01:12 PM.
Peter9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-03-2013, 02:03 PM
  #2
Canadiens1958
Registered User
 
Canadiens1958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 11,787
vCash: 500
Ratings

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter9 View Post
Dishonorable mention deserved by CNBC, which advertised it would show the opening game in the Senators-Canadiens series Thursday. I along with an unknown number of other fans watched well into the third period of a closely-contested match. With about eight minutes to go and the Senators leading by a single goal, 3-2, CNBC, without any announcement whatsoever, suddenly ended its coverage of the game and switched to the start of the Kings-Blues game. That is the ultimate in disrespect to sports fans. It was unprofessional and unethical. It was also false advertising. After investing more than two hours in the game, we were deprived of its climax.

This is all reminiscent, of course, of the infamous incident in which NBC created a nationwide uproar by switching from the last few minutes of an NFL game to a showing of the film Heidi. That game was voted the most memorable in NFL history at the close of the last century because of the outrage. For those who are too young to remember it first hand, hereís a piece on it in Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidi_Game

CNBC responded to my complaint by saying the time allotted for the Senators-Canadiens game had expired. Unbelievable! Thatís a poor explanation to begin withóthe same one given in the Heidi incident, by the wayóbut it becomes ridiculous in the context of the playoffs. Donít they know that playoff games often go into overtime, that you canít predict how long they wlll last.

In any event, these telecasters need to learn a lesson. Once you put a game on, you stay with it to the finish. Would it have hurt that bad to put off showing part of the first period of the Kings-Blues game so we could watch the finish of a game we had spent more than two hours watching? Itís obvious CNBCís NHL playoff coverage cannot be relied on.

I can remember only two other television hockey coverage incidents that were as outrageous, both in international play. One was CBS coverage of a game between NHL All-Stars and the Soviet Union. Madison Square Garden put advertising on the boards for the first time and CBS objected to giving away free advertising to the board advertisers. So it had its cameras go only as high as the low point of the boards on the far side of the ice, which meant the game was unwatchable. The other was a game circa 1987 between Canada and the Soviet Union, when a Los Angeles cable company just shut off the game before it went into overtime. It claimed it was bound by contract to show another program at the time it cut off its coverage. When I complained, the cable company invited me and a friend down to the studio to watch the game on its feed. We took them up on it since they were only a few miles away and made it for the overtime.
Not surprising as ratings drive such decisions and the telecaster may have had hometown complaints about not showing the Kings.

The board advertising situation is rather funny. Funnier in shared arenas.

In the province of Quebec there are situations where an arena is shared by teams in different leagues, different hockey associations, different sports, etc. If both parties are allowed to sell board space, then the second group simply attaches their ads over the first, leaving common sponsors in place. Unsold spots are blank covered.

BTW - nice to see you posting again.

Canadiens1958 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-03-2013, 02:24 PM
  #3
Doctor No
Mod Supervisor
My Name Is Judge
 
Doctor No's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 25,223
vCash: 500
A "Heidi" is a bit of an overstatement.

What made the "Heidi" game memorable is that the Raiders came back to win after the broadcast had been terminated.

I agree that I'd rather have seen the end of the game (and then join the later game in-progress) but networks do this all the time (particularly during the college basketball tournament).

Doctor No is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-03-2013, 07:28 PM
  #4
Peter9
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Los Angeles, USA
Country: United States
Posts: 382
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taco MacArthur View Post
A "Heidi" is a bit of an overstatement.

What made the "Heidi" game memorable is that the Raiders came back to win after the broadcast had been terminated.

I agree that I'd rather have seen the end of the game (and then join the later game in-progress) but networks do this all the time (particularly during the college basketball tournament).
It certainly is a Heidi. CNBC didn't know whether the Canadiens would come back when it switched games. It's amazing what you younger sports fans will accept these days--shoddy treatment and no respect. It's no wonder CNBC thinks it can get away with this. Of course it's the dollar-blinded generation in charge now; they have no values except the almight dollar. Wave a dollar in front of them and they'll do almost anything.

I've watched thousands of NHL games over the years since 1953, Hockey Night in Canada's second year of existence, and I've never seen something like this. Name one hockey game where the station or network or channel or whatever advertised it would show a game and let you watch for two and a half periods--or any substantial time--and then suddenly at the climactic moment of the game suddenly switched coverage to another game. You can't do it. I hope you have the experience of watching your teamn play and having the same thing happen with half the third period left in a game where one team has a single lead goal. Trust me; you won't like it. Anyway, it is unacceptable to any true sports fan (and also true Scotsmen.

Meanwhile, CNBC continues to advertise tonight's Ottawa-Montreal game (and others) with this slogan: "Every Game, Every Night Because it's the Cup." That's already demonstrably false.


Last edited by Peter9: 05-03-2013 at 07:40 PM.
Peter9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-03-2013, 07:41 PM
  #5
HockeyGuy73
Registered User
 
HockeyGuy73's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Tad south of STL.
Posts: 411
vCash: 134
I agree, only way that is acceptable is if the switch was made in St. Louis or LA. Everyone else should have stayed with the other game until it was over. IMO.

HockeyGuy73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-03-2013, 07:56 PM
  #6
Peter9
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Los Angeles, USA
Country: United States
Posts: 382
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyGuy73 View Post
I agree, only way that is acceptable is if the switch was made in St. Louis or LA. Everyone else should have stayed with the other game until it was over. IMO.
There are as many, if not more, Canadiens fans in Southern California as there are Kings fans. I used to attend Kings games fairly regularly, and their fan base was outnumbered by any visiting Original Six team. That's probably changed in recent years, but I doubt if Kings fans are a big majority.

Look, if you advertise you will show a game and fans watch it for two and a half periods, the network showing the game has an ethical obligation to show it to its conclusion. It doesn't matter that it perhaps can get higher ratings by switching to another game just as the game it is showing reaches the climactic last few minutes. It's a question of ethics. You show the game until it's over period. The only exception is if the network warns viewers in advance that it might switch its coverage to another game, in which case they can make other arrangements to watch the game.

Again, with lukewarm attitudes like yours, it's no wonder sports fans get shoddy treatment and no respect. Movie fans would be up in arms if a network showed a film for two hours and then stopped airing it just as the climax was reached in favor of airing a more popular movie. Apparently today's sports fans will accept shoddy treatment that movie fans wouldn't.

Anyway, I've made a complaint that includes the false advertising claim among others to the Federal Communications Commission. Not that I expect anything to come from it, but I won't accept this kind of shoddy treatment without a complaint.

Every Game, Every Night (except in Los Angeles and St. Louis) Because it's the Cup.


Last edited by Peter9: 05-03-2013 at 08:05 PM.
Peter9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-03-2013, 10:41 PM
  #7
Hawkman
Moderator
Chicago Sports
 
Hawkman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 5,087
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taco MacArthur View Post
A "Heidi" is a bit of an overstatement. What made the "Heidi" game memorable is that the Raiders came back to win after the broadcast had been terminated. I agree that I'd rather have seen the end of the game (and then join the later game in-progress) but networks do this all the time (particularly during the college basketball tournament).
Agreed. Also the NFL was nothing compared to what it is now. The Raiders coming back made it memorable, not the NFL being huge the way it is now. It would be bigger deal if local NHL fans missed part of their local team's playoff game, because of another game. Some teams like the Hawks go half a century between Cups and it's not fair if their fans miss a playoff game.

Hawkman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-03-2013, 11:21 PM
  #8
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 20,061
vCash: 500
I always thought the "Heidi" game sort of symbolized the moment when networks stopped breaking from a live game. But I guess not. Then again, it's CNBC. However, you would think they'd wait until the end of the Habs/Sens game to ensure what the outcome is and go directly to the late game afterwards. Far better to miss the beginning of a game than the end.

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-03-2013, 11:34 PM
  #9
skeena1
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 886
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter9 View Post
It certainly is a Heidi. CNBC didn't know whether the Canadiens would come back when it switched games. It's amazing what you younger sports fans will accept these days--shoddy treatment and no respect. It's no wonder CNBC thinks it can get away with this. Of course it's the dollar-blinded generation in charge now; they have no values except the almight dollar. Wave a dollar in front of them and they'll do almost anything.

I've watched thousands of NHL games over the years since 1953, Hockey Night in Canada's second year of existence, and I've never seen something like this. Name one hockey game where the station or network or channel or whatever advertised it would show a game and let you watch for two and a half periods--or any substantial time--and then suddenly at the climactic moment of the game suddenly switched coverage to another game. You can't do it. I hope you have the experience of watching your teamn play and having the same thing happen with half the third period left in a game where one team has a single lead goal. Trust me; you won't like it. Anyway, it is unacceptable to any true sports fan (and also true Scotsmen.

Meanwhile, CNBC continues to advertise tonight's Ottawa-Montreal game (and others) with this slogan: "Every Game, Every Night Because it's the Cup." That's already demonstrably false.
You may have missed this:

http://classicshowbiz.blogspot.com/2...nada-1986.html


Last edited by skeena1: 05-03-2013 at 11:34 PM. Reason: Spelling.
skeena1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-03-2013, 11:53 PM
  #10
charliolemieux
rsTmf
 
charliolemieux's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Country: Canada
Posts: 9,578
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter9 View Post
Dishonorable mention deserved by CNBC, which advertised it would show the opening game in the Senators-Canadiens series Thursday. I along with an unknown number of other fans watched well into the third period of a closely-contested match. With about eight minutes to go and the Senators leading by a single goal, 3-2, CNBC, without any announcement whatsoever, suddenly ended its coverage of the game and switched to the start of the Kings-Blues game. That is the ultimate in disrespect to sports fans. It was unprofessional and unethical. It was also false advertising. After investing more than two hours in the game, we were deprived of its climax.

This is all reminiscent, of course, of the infamous incident in which NBC created a nationwide uproar by switching from the last few minutes of an NFL game to a showing of the film Heidi. That game was voted the most memorable in NFL history at the close of the last century because of the outrage. For those who are too young to remember it first hand, hereís a piece on it in Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidi_Game

CNBC responded to my complaint by saying the time allotted for the Senators-Canadiens game had expired. Unbelievable! Thatís a poor explanation to begin withóthe same one given in the Heidi incident, by the wayóbut it becomes ridiculous in the context of the playoffs. Donít they know that playoff games often go into overtime, that you canít predict how long they wlll last.

In any event, these telecasters need to learn a lesson. Once you put a game on, you stay with it to the finish. Would it have hurt that bad to put off showing part of the first period of the Kings-Blues game so we could watch the finish of a game we had spent more than two hours watching? Itís obvious CNBCís NHL playoff coverage cannot be relied on.

I can remember only two other television hockey coverage incidents that were as outrageous, both in international play. One was CBS coverage of a game between NHL All-Stars and the Soviet Union. Madison Square Garden put advertising on the boards for the first time and CBS objected to giving away free advertising to the board advertisers. So it had its cameras go only as high as the low point of the boards on the far side of the ice, which meant the game was unwatchable. The other was a game circa 1987 between Canada and the Soviet Union, when a Los Angeles cable company just shut off the game before it went into overtime. It claimed it was bound by contract to show another program at the time it cut off its coverage. When I complained, the cable company invited me and a friend down to the studio to watch the game on its feed. We took them up on it since they were only a few miles away and made it for the overtime.
Look you'll never please everyone.

The first Saturday night back from the 04-05 lockout the LEafs and Sens were making history by being the first game to go to a shootout in NHL history. You would think people would be excited about seeing some history being made. BUt no. A large portion of Vancouver fans when ballistic about missing a stupid opening game faceoff, when CBC didn't cut to Vancouver, even locally, when the game started.

CNBC probably figured that LAK v. STL would be a much better draw. Simple $.

charliolemieux is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-04-2013, 09:24 AM
  #11
Disengage
Registered User
 
Disengage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Ontario, NY
Country: United States
Posts: 581
vCash: 500
CNBC switched the game on a regional basis. I watched it about 2 hours from Ottawa in the US and CNBC showed the game to it's conclusion.

Disengage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2013, 08:47 PM
  #12
jumptheshark
the burn out
 
jumptheshark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: hf retirement home
Country: United Nations
Posts: 57,163
vCash: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taco MacArthur View Post
A "Heidi" is a bit of an overstatement.

What made the "Heidi" game memorable is that the Raiders came back to win after the broadcast had been terminated.

I agree that I'd rather have seen the end of the game (and then join the later game in-progress) but networks do this all the time (particularly during the college basketball tournament).
this is not a heidi moment--they went to another game

if they went to the bloomsburg report then I can could see the argument

jumptheshark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-07-2013, 01:32 AM
  #13
ozzie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Australia
Posts: 989
vCash: 500
Dave Hodge is a hero because of speaking out about this kind of crap.

ozzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-07-2013, 02:29 PM
  #14
Roomtemperature
Registered User
 
Roomtemperature's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,414
vCash: 923
Quote:
Originally Posted by jumptheshark View Post
this is not a heidi moment--they went to another game

if they went to the bloomsburg report then I can could see the argument
Yeah its not a Heidi. The NFL does that all the time where I'm watching an out of market game but the Jets or Giants kickoff is coming up. So they have to cut away to the start of the in market game. I hate it as I'm not a fan of either but what can I do?

Roomtemperature is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:40 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2015 All Rights Reserved.