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International Tournaments Discuss international tournaments such as the World Juniors, Olympic hockey, and Ice Hockey World Championships, as they take place; or discuss past tournaments.

May 16 • Quarterfinal • Canada vs. Sweden • Part II (stats in #1; read #459)

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Old
05-17-2013, 06:24 PM
  #576
McClelland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 21 View Post
Landeskog will fight when angry ;-) He is only 20 years old though and had a serious concussion this season.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLRHmtnrjKE

Douglas Murray is stronger and fight better than most Canadians but hopefully he will get a Cup for the Penguins.

I get the impression that finally (better late than never) Mårts is starting to understand how good and valuable Landeskog is. I suspect he will gets lots of icetime vs Finland.
They have alot better options in Na to find goons, in Sweden they educate hockeyplayers. Best Swedish fighter in the Nhl ive seen is johnny Odoya, but he had a older brother Fredrik(died in a car accident 2 years ago) who did time in the Ahl and he was the real deal.

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05-17-2013, 11:43 PM
  #577
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Originally Posted by McClelland View Post
They have alot better options in Na to find goons, in Sweden they educate hockeyplayers. Best Swedish fighter in the Nhl ive seen is johnny Odoya, but he had a older brother Fredrik(died in a car accident 2 years ago) who did time in the Ahl and he was the real deal.
Uhh Oduya isnt a fighter anymore he just was that in the SEL and Murray or Landeskog would just walk over him. Murray is just a freak of nature hes also 20kg heavier then Oduya.

But Im with you on the part that they have better options over there to find goons.

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Old
05-18-2013, 12:13 AM
  #578
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Congrats to the Swiss

Canada has the most talented players in the world but keep coming up short. Management needs a serious overhaul

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05-18-2013, 01:52 AM
  #579
21
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Originally Posted by McClelland View Post
They have alot better options in Na to find goons, in Sweden they educate hockeyplayers. Best Swedish fighter in the Nhl ive seen is johnny Odoya, but he had a older brother Fredrik(died in a car accident 2 years ago) who did time in the Ahl and he was the real deal.
Johnny Oduya fought during his junior career and in SEL but almost never in the NHL, perhaps once?

Oduya changed his style of playing completely in New Jersey under mentorship from the legendary Larry Robinson, these days Johnny is more focused on playing and winning.

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05-18-2013, 02:02 AM
  #580
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Originally Posted by TheRobinGoblin View Post
I like when Sweden plays Canada simply because both fans and teams act classy for the most, just two good teams playing well. When we face Finland I think the rivalry sometimes goes to far, with fans on both sides sometimes acting idiotic. Looking forward to the game tomorrow, Finland has played well and "we" are in for a tough challenge (again).

Edit: I think the booing wasnt much of an issue at the Staal incident, I think it was simply a misunderstanding by the fans of what had happened to Staal and how severe his injury actually was. That they applauded when he got up shows this. There are though always some drunken idiots, or idiots in general, that will boo regardless but they are a minority. I think it was a shame though that some, quite a few, starting booing when it was time for the shooutot. That is questionable behavior imo.
Yes, the only reason for the booing was Edler's match penalty, the booing was for the referre. Lots of people thought the play was an accident, even if it was a serious accident. Of course it's wrong boing when a player is laying on the ice crying of pain but unfortunately it happened.

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05-18-2013, 04:28 AM
  #581
RipsADrive
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Originally Posted by M Ace View Post
......and they still believe it is the year of 1966 the only year they have even been close to call themselves world champions!
Or you could look to the most recent Olympics also known as a true best on best tournament.

Can you remind how that one turned out for both countries?

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05-18-2013, 05:37 AM
  #582
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Originally Posted by Yakushev72 View Post
Good points! The Soviet teams in the '70's and '80's logged many more hours of grueling training than is the case now, but you're right, the byproduct of that hard work was a beautiful form of hockey that may not be duplicated. Guys like Larionov began complaining that the training was too hard and inconvenient for the players, even though he ended up making probably 50 or 60 million as a result of the training. Now the Russian teams are just like everyone else: thrown together, disorganized, and never really knowing what kind of effort the team will provide.
Can you not sympathize with Larionov though? They were away from their families maybe 300 days a year, living under military conditions, under an extreme pressure to always win. That's a pretty depressing enviroment, hockey must be about having fun as well, not only seen as a duty for your country.



Last edited by Chimp: 05-18-2013 at 05:43 AM.
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05-18-2013, 06:34 AM
  #583
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Originally Posted by Chimp View Post
Can you not sympathize with Larionov though? They were away from their families maybe 300 days a year, living under military conditions, under an extreme pressure to always win. That's a pretty depressing enviroment, hockey must be about having fun as well, not only seen as a duty for your country.

I think I've watched that documentary over 5 times now

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05-18-2013, 02:11 PM
  #584
PaulieVegas
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Originally Posted by skippyeyes View Post
I swear you just wait around until Canada is eliminated, just so you can post that exact same sentiment every single year.

I know it's hard for you to accept, but most Canadians truly don't care about this tournament, win or lose. I have no problem admitting that I care, but I'm in the minority. And when Canada wins the tournament (as it has several times in the past), people still don't care. After a win, you won't hear anybody celebrate or even so much acknowledge the victory, aside from the diehards here on HF.

However, when we lose at the World Juniors or the Olympics, everyone cares. When Canada blew that lead against the Russians a few yeas back at the World jrs. to lose the gold medal, that's all everyone talked about the next day.
God forbid Canadians can ever just swallow their pride and admit they got beat by a better team. Regardless of the tournament, when Canadians lose the "Canadian excuse parade" comes out in full force, always. Only question is which excuse to use, which is largely dependent on which tournament it is.

The "we don't care about that tournament anyway" excuse is usually reserved for the Worlds, women's hockey, the U-18's, and the U-17's.

When you lose the U-20's, the World Cup, and the Olympics, you dust off either the "we didn't have our best players" excuse or the "we were still the better team despite the result" justification. Or both.

You can put me down and throw insults at me all you want, that's fine. Anything you need to do to mask the fact you're a country of sore losers when it comes to hockey.

When USA beats Canada, we deserve to enjoy the moment, and those of us who pay attention are insulted that Canada always has to rain our our parade instead of just saying "Congrats USA." When your response to a loss is to pull out your parade of excuses, then yeah, we have the right to be offended. All the "you just wait around every year for Canada to be eliminated" crap won't change that.

Canada had a golden opportunity at the juniors this year to prove they're not the sore losers we all think they are. You had your best players, it was a tournament you cared aboout, and you were far from the best team in either the SF's or the bronze medal game. None of the usual suspects of Canadian excuses was applicable, it was a glorious chance for you to react to losing with class.

Instead, the rest of the world got treated to a round of "well, we didn't have Ryan Murray" junk and "well, we were rusty because we didn't play a QF game, if we'd had that extra game we'd have won gold" garbage.


Last edited by PaulieVegas: 05-18-2013 at 02:24 PM. Reason: Grammatical error corrected.
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