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Self Confident Teammates

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Old
06-16-2013, 11:48 PM
  #1
Trl3789
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Self Confident Teammates

I'm curious how many of you have or have had to deal with teammates that were extremely confident in their abilities. How do you approach the situation?

One of our teammates is quite good, can stick handle very well, and scores a lot of goals for us. I should add that while i think he could play up a level, i don't think hes head and shoulders better, or too good to be playing in our level. My issue is that I feel the reason he scores so much is because he rarely passes the puck. He'd rather try to go through 3 players than take a chance passing to a pretty open teammate. He also tends to take quite long shifts. I fully believe this is because he is quite good, believes he is good, doesn't trust some of us and thinks we have a better chance at scoring if he is on the ice and/or takes it himself. He's a really good guy, its just frustrating to watch from D sometimes and i don't know if i should approach it, or how to go about saying something.

Anyone have any experience with a situation like this?

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06-17-2013, 12:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trl3789 View Post
I'm curious how many of you have or have had to deal with teammates that were extremely confident in their abilities. How do you approach the situation?

One of our teammates is quite good, can stick handle very well, and scores a lot of goals for us. I should add that while i think he could play up a level, i don't think hes head and shoulders better, or too good to be playing in our level. My issue is that I feel the reason he scores so much is because he rarely passes the puck. He'd rather try to go through 3 players than take a chance passing to a pretty open teammate. He also tends to take quite long shifts. I fully believe this is because he is quite good, believes he is good, doesn't trust some of us and thinks we have a better chance at scoring if he is on the ice and/or takes it himself. He's a really good guy, its just frustrating to watch from D sometimes and i don't know if i should approach it, or how to go about saying something.

Anyone have any experience with a situation like this?
My team kicked a guy off for playing his shifts too long, criticizing his teammates, and never passing. It's been a much more enjoyable experience without him.

I'd suggest just reminding him to take 'x' amount of time on his shift, some players just don't pass and that's something you'd likely have to deal with.

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06-17-2013, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Trl3789 View Post
I'm curious how many of you have or have had to deal with teammates that were extremely confident in their abilities. How do you approach the situation?

One of our teammates is quite good, can stick handle very well, and scores a lot of goals for us. I should add that while i think he could play up a level, i don't think hes head and shoulders better, or too good to be playing in our level. My issue is that I feel the reason he scores so much is because he rarely passes the puck. He'd rather try to go through 3 players than take a chance passing to a pretty open teammate. He also tends to take quite long shifts. I fully believe this is because he is quite good, believes he is good, doesn't trust some of us and thinks we have a better chance at scoring if he is on the ice and/or takes it himself. He's a really good guy, its just frustrating to watch from D sometimes and i don't know if i should approach it, or how to go about saying something.

Anyone have any experience with a situation like this?
The problem is that he knows how valuable his contributions are. Even guys who are otherwise solid characters off the ice can have this "you need me" type of mentality. Regardless of what he brings to the table this is a team game and no one player can do it all themselves.

Although cliche, sometimes you have to bust out the old "we all pay the same amount" line when it comes to the ice time issue.

As for the selfish play, I would acknowledge how valuable he is to the team, but strees that everyone else is buying into the team philosophy, and in order for him to do that, he has to trust his teammates more. Growing up, guys with a lot of skill are leaned on quite a bit by their coaches and sometimes in the name of winning, their abilities are put in front of what is fair to the rest of the guys on the team. Unfortunately, these kids grow up to be men with an over-inflated sense of self importance; point being that this may not be something he's doing conciously.

There should be no harm in approaching him and talking to him respectfully about it. If he reacts to constructive criticism/feedback negatively, you know that you tried and you will learn what type of a person he really is... And maybe that person isn't the best fit for your team.

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06-17-2013, 10:49 AM
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Sojourn
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I think you mean a cocky or selfish teammate. Self confidence doesn't really have negative connotations. Being self-assured is a good thing in sports.

As for a cocky or selfish teammate, I think you should just reinforce that this is a team game, and the entire team wants to be involved in winning or losing. It isn't fun to play with someone who tries to do it all, and it isn't fun to play against someone like that, either. He wouldn't just be spoiling the game for one team, he'd be spoiling the game for two.

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06-17-2013, 12:08 PM
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dealing with two of these type of guys right now. one of them took a 3 minute shift in OT last game and scored the GWG, then blew past the 4 guys giving him high fives and did a Yakupov-style celebration.after the game, he said " oh im sorry for stealing your shift dude. i was just feeling it out there". its safe to say hes getting zero passes from me tonight

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06-17-2013, 12:33 PM
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Yeah, I always hate it when guys take extended shifts or never pass the puck or dont play defense, then end up scoring a goal. Its a lot harder to yell at them and convince them they did something wrong when they score.

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06-17-2013, 12:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theMajor View Post
dealing with two of these type of guys right now. one of them took a 3 minute shift in OT last game and scored the GWG, then blew past the 4 guys giving him high fives and did a Yakupov-style celebration.after the game, he said " oh im sorry for stealing your shift dude. i was just feeling it out there". its safe to say hes getting zero passes from me tonight
Depending on how competitive the team is, it's kind of hard to get on a guy about taking a long shift if he gives the team a quality chance to win or tie the game (if he's applying pressure the entire duration).

I'll take a longer shift if the game is winding down and I'm having success and the other lines aren't, but only if it's an absolutely must win and it needs to be the end of the game. I figure, I spend the whole season playing even minutes or less (sometimes I'm courteous in more lopsided games), so if I'm performing well I can take an extra minute or two in the last game if need be.

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06-17-2013, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by TriCycleDriveBy View Post
Depending on how competitive the team is, it's kind of hard to get on a guy about taking a long shift if he gives the team a quality chance to win or tie the game (if he's applying pressure the entire duration).

I'll take a longer shift if the game is winding down and I'm having success and the other lines aren't, but only if it's an absolutely must win and it needs to be the end of the game. I figure, I spend the whole season playing even minutes or less (sometimes I'm courteous in more lopsided games), so if I'm performing well I can take an extra minute or two in the last game if need be.
scoring the GWG was the only thing he did right all game. hes lazy as poo, doesnt backcheck worth a damn, doesnt pass, i could go on forever. if he hadnt of scored the GWG i would have given him a verbal beatdown in the lockeroom after... this kid hogs ice time every game, this time he just happened to make something positive out of it

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06-17-2013, 07:56 PM
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My team's captain takes super long shifts and doesn't pass.

Don't think we can kick him off the team though. Sucks.

At least he's a nice guy.

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06-17-2013, 09:30 PM
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Originally Posted by theMajor View Post
scoring the GWG was the only thing he did right all game. hes lazy as poo, doesnt backcheck worth a damn, doesnt pass, i could go on forever. if he hadnt of scored the GWG i would have given him a verbal beatdown in the lockeroom after... this kid hogs ice time every game, this time he just happened to make something positive out of it
Yeah, those are the worst.

I put more emphasis on making sure I backcheck hard than I do on trying to score for the majority of the game. Being lazy doesn't help anyone on the team. I've coached kids like that before, they'd come to the bench and I'd just say, 'That was horrible, you're very lucky you scored. Don't ever do that **** again'.

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06-17-2013, 11:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Sojourn View Post
I think you mean a cocky or selfish teammate. Self confidence doesn't really have negative connotations. Being self-assured is a good thing in sports.

As for a cocky or selfish teammate, I think you should just reinforce that this is a team game, and the entire team wants to be involved in winning or losing. It isn't fun to play with someone who tries to do it all, and it isn't fun to play against someone like that, either. He wouldn't just be spoiling the game for one team, he'd be spoiling the game for two.
I was actually trying really hard to avoid the negative connotations. He isn't out there bragging, doesn't get on other teammates, isn't shoving it in our faces that we need him. Its a lot closer to a quiet, NBA "get on my back" type of situation. Our team isn't that great, so we really do need help scoring, it's just frustrating to watch from D.

He usually skates back hard and does play D, although from time to time he takes too long a shift and runs out of gas.It seems almost like a vicious circle to be in.Teammates have trouble finishing opportunities, so he starts trying to do it by himself. At the same time, if he didn't try to do it by himself, maybe the teammates would get better with those opportunities.

Again, i want to reiterate he is a good teammate, supports everyone else, and does play hard.

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06-18-2013, 10:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theMajor View Post
scoring the GWG was the only thing he did right all game. hes lazy as poo, doesnt backcheck worth a damn, doesnt pass, i could go on forever. if he hadnt of scored the GWG i would have given him a verbal beatdown in the lockeroom after... this kid hogs ice time every game, this time he just happened to make something positive out of it
I've got a guy EXACTLY like this. Talked to him on the bench a couple times, no results. The guy likes to try and dangle dudes. Sometimes it works, most times it doesn't. May need to pull him aside and have a legit chat.

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06-18-2013, 10:59 AM
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same guy played the exact same way last night, except this time he didnt get a single point. he was so pissed after the game he packed up his gear and left the locker-room without saying a single word

stat counters really tick me off!

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06-18-2013, 04:56 PM
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I have a guy just like this on my team except he's terrible. He thinks he's Kris Letang when really hes a much much worse (if possible) Marek Zidlicky. He skates end to end and loses the puck 9 times out 10 while the whole time I doubt ''pass" ever came to mind. When he can't gain the zone, he tries to go bar down from the blue line which always looks like a silly lob the goalie gloves down. The worst thing that can happen is when he does score.

Last night in a close game, think it was 2-2, he came end to end, looked at me on the doorstep wide open and opted to try and do a wrap around instead. By sheer luck and circumstance the puck took six different bounces and went in. He probably passed up a half dozen scoring chances via passing from the point on and can be accredited with allowing at least 3 goals due to shotty, if even existent defense. We ended up losing 9-4. I've found that there's really nothing that can be said to this type of person. If you even do get him to 'get with the program' its with such a pessimistic attitude and there's no hesitation in casting doubt the first time you don't score where "I would have put that in"

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06-18-2013, 11:38 PM
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The showoffs are the worse. There is no greater satisfaction then smothering them and them looking bewildered as you race to the other end. Very rarely do you see a full-spectrum player that can do everything. It's mostly the end-to-end one dimensional guys.

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06-18-2013, 11:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trl3789 View Post
I'm curious how many of you have or have had to deal with teammates that were extremely confident in their abilities. How do you approach the situation?

One of our teammates is quite good, can stick handle very well, and scores a lot of goals for us. I should add that while i think he could play up a level, i don't think hes head and shoulders better, or too good to be playing in our level. My issue is that I feel the reason he scores so much is because he rarely passes the puck. He'd rather try to go through 3 players than take a chance passing to a pretty open teammate. He also tends to take quite long shifts. I fully believe this is because he is quite good, believes he is good, doesn't trust some of us and thinks we have a better chance at scoring if he is on the ice and/or takes it himself. He's a really good guy, its just frustrating to watch from D sometimes and i don't know if i should approach it, or how to go about saying something.

Anyone have any experience with a situation like this?
This is very commonplace. A player with blinders who tries to do everything, while playing with comparable talent around him as opposed to talent far beneath him.

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06-18-2013, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Wilch View Post
My team's captain takes super long shifts and doesn't pass.

Don't think we can kick him off the team though. Sucks.

At least he's a nice guy.
I can't understand the aversion to pass from some of these primadonnas. It's common sense to understand that the puck moves quicker than the man, and unless you're playing with down syndrome teammates it's the right way to play.

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06-19-2013, 06:51 AM
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Any truly elite players that I have gotten a chance to play with would not pass up a quality scoring chance if the opportunity presented itself, but also would not hesitate to distribute the puck if they did not have a clean look.

I used to play with a guy that would skate in on the goalie and if he didn't get the look that he wanted, circled around the net like Bobby Orr and would just skate around our offensive zone, holding the puck. Once the defense had set up in the zone and the lanes had closed he'd eventually pass it, but only if there is no scoring play for him. The thing I never understood was that the guy wasn't particularly fast, but had quick hands; He could have used those quick hands to generate some bang-bang plays, but the thought never crossed his mind. Instead he would just dangle around everybody until he was trapped and ended up caughing up the puck trying to dangle his way out.

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06-20-2013, 10:40 AM
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If you don't want them to play on your team, give them the old 'it's not you it's me' excuse.

Tell them they're too good to play on your team, should be playing with better players & good luck....

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06-20-2013, 03:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trl3789 View Post
I'm curious how many of you have or have had to deal with teammates that were extremely confident in their abilities. How do you approach the situation?

One of our teammates is quite good, can stick handle very well, and scores a lot of goals for us. I should add that while i think he could play up a level, i don't think hes head and shoulders better, or too good to be playing in our level. My issue is that I feel the reason he scores so much is because he rarely passes the puck. He'd rather try to go through 3 players than take a chance passing to a pretty open teammate. He also tends to take quite long shifts. I fully believe this is because he is quite good, believes he is good, doesn't trust some of us and thinks we have a better chance at scoring if he is on the ice and/or takes it himself. He's a really good guy, its just frustrating to watch from D sometimes and i don't know if i should approach it, or how to go about saying something.

Anyone have any experience with a situation like this?
Yup. Unless you're willing to say something to his face, give him gentle reminders about how to be a good teammate.
When the seasons over don't bother inviting him back next year.

We've had to do that a few times.
In my experience, the 'too good for you' guy is usually someone who's not even a real close friend (most times, a friend of a friend), so it's easy to cut them out without having to see him a lot afterward.

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06-20-2013, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Tundra View Post
I can't understand the aversion to pass from some of these primadonnas. It's common sense to understand that the puck moves quicker than the man, and unless you're playing with down syndrome teammates it's the right way to play.
He plays with his head down.

Lack of vision on his part.

If by down syndrome you mean playing with his head down, then yes.

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06-20-2013, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by AngryBoss View Post
Yup. Unless you're willing to say something to his face, give him gentle reminders about how to be a good teammate.
When the seasons over don't bother inviting him back next year.

We've had to do that a few times.
In my experience, the 'too good for you' guy is usually someone who's not even a real close friend (most times, a friend of a friend), so it's easy to cut them out without having to see him a lot afterward.
Thats the thing, i'm sure if I was the one he wasn't passing to, i'd have no problem talking to him about it. But because we play at such a low level, and most of the offense i get is clearing attempts i keep in the zone, i don't feel like me saying "pass the puck" would mean much.

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06-21-2013, 12:31 PM
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I've never had anyone good enough to be cocky on a hockey team.

I shoot way more than I pass because at my level guys struggle to catch passes, I'm not great at giving them passes, and I can shoot better than most of them. Higher percentage play to take the shot. But I don't force it if I can see a passing lane. My captain and most of my team prefers it that way.

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06-24-2013, 10:57 AM
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In my summer league team (not enough teams, so we get mixed teams with ABCD divisions all thrown together in a draft, quite fun actually) we have the top scorer of the winter league in division B. And I mean that guy won the scoring title with like 20 points. He very seldom comes off the ice, he thinks it's best for the team if he plays all the time. He is insanely fast and has an awesome shot, but as a person just a dick. Last game he was struggling to score, because the other team shut him down, knowing he rarely passes the puck and will try to score on his own. We finally won 6-5 without any contribution from him, most goals came from division D/C guys like me, you know, the grinding type of goals, nothing fancy.

He was so upset after the game that he told us not to talk to him... Oh well, these type of guys deserves to be the way they are...

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06-28-2013, 07:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trl3789 View Post
I'm curious how many of you have or have had to deal with teammates that were extremely confident in their abilities. How do you approach the situation?

One of our teammates is quite good, can stick handle very well, and scores a lot of goals for us. I should add that while i think he could play up a level, i don't think hes head and shoulders better, or too good to be playing in our level. My issue is that I feel the reason he scores so much is because he rarely passes the puck. He'd rather try to go through 3 players than take a chance passing to a pretty open teammate. He also tends to take quite long shifts. I fully believe this is because he is quite good, believes he is good, doesn't trust some of us and thinks we have a better chance at scoring if he is on the ice and/or takes it himself. He's a really good guy, its just frustrating to watch from D sometimes and i don't know if i should approach it, or how to go about saying something.

Anyone have any experience with a situation like this?
We had a guy like that on our team about 2-3 years ago. Lost the game in either the closing seconds of regulation or OT. Dude gets pissed, throws his stick across the locker room like a javelin, and goes into a tantrum about how he's the only one trying out there. Yeah, when he's taking 5 minute shifts, nobody else gets a chance to try, not to mention the score was something like 8-7 or 7-6...which yes, the game was every bit one-dimensional as the score indicates.

One guy, and it was the least likely person from the team to ever speak up during something like this, looks at the guy and says "Nailers are in town this weekend. Why don't you talk to them about a tryout?" Considering the situation - we just lost, the quiet person on the team unexpectedly speaks up to the showboater - the entire room starts laughing. Showboater doesn't say a word, gets changed, and says he doesn't need this **** and never showed up the rest of the year. Needless to say, with that player gone, the season was much better since people were actually able to take a regular shift and not worry about when a certain player felt like coming off.

Regardless of whether that player is that good or not, he's still a rec leaguer just like everybody else on the team.

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