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Old
01-07-2011, 07:13 AM
  #1
Curtinho
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New to Playing Hockey

Hi all.

I'm going to be playing hockey this year (mostly pick-up), and then going on a recreational team (to start) next year. I've been skating for a long time though I'm nowhere near where I want to be as I'm quite competitive and I want to be a very good skater (as I find that is one of the most important things for a guy my size.)

With all that in mind, I've never played Hockey on a team before. I've played some road hockey, and maybe two or three games of ice hockey in my life so I'm pretty much a complete 'noob.' I was wondering if anyone has any tips? I've been to 'howtohockey.com' and looked at some of their articles and videos which have been helpful. I haven't bought equipment yet, but I did buy some Bauer Vapors and a Reebok stick with a P87A curve (it's a composite.) Both were relatively cheap as together they cost me about $220.

Any help would be appreciated. I'm 5'9 and 3/4 (lol) and about 160lbs. I can already skate fairly fast, but I'd like to be faster. That's about all I have to offer.

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01-07-2011, 10:56 AM
  #2
Rocko604
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I'd try and see if you can join an adult hockey skills course. That'll probably give you a solid foundation of positioning and game knowledge, if you need it. One thing to know what to do yelling at a tv screen, quite another to do it on the ice. For the skating, I'd recommend an adult power skating course. You might only need something as simple as a technique change to improve your speed.

Other than that, you seem to have a good plan. Play as much drop-in hockey as you can, and go to stick and puck sessions to work on your skating and puck handling. Good luck!

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01-08-2011, 03:11 PM
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Badger36
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Skating fast is great, but you also need to be able to change direction quickly, stop quickly and skate backwards.
Skating fast alone isnt going to make you a good hockey player.
Id strongly suggest taking some hockey skating lessons.
As for gear, I personally wouldnt play hockey without a helmet, hockey gloves and skin/knee guards. Hockey pants and shoulder pads would be good too, but for pickup hockey I think youd be OK with just a helmet, gloves and shin guards.

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01-08-2011, 05:22 PM
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Curtinho
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Oh I know there's more to skating than speed, that's why I said that I want to really focus on my skating. The speed thing is just a personal thing that I want. Being the fastest person on the ice is definitely an advantage, though I don't expect it to determine how good I am at hockey.

Thanks for the tips though! I'm going in for skating tonight and I'll find out then what I need for the pick-up and when I can start coming in for a power skating/hockey clinic.

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01-09-2011, 04:13 AM
  #5
biturbo19
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aside from the skating and obvious things like puck skills, etc. ... i hesitate to say it because posting on a site like this, i'm sure you're already quite familiar with positioning and the responsibilities of different players on the ice...but i feel compelled to emphasize familiarizing yourself with the various positions and their roles as an important thing to do, if you've never really played before.

i've seen a lot of real beginners who may love hockey immensely and watch a ton of it, but when they get out on the ice, they seem to have zero concept of where the should be at any given moment. and knowing where you should be and getting yourself into proper positions at the right times can make even an average skater seem like they're flying around.

probably an obvious and not at all helpful tip, but i thought i'd throw it out there anyway.

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01-09-2011, 11:07 PM
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Curtinho
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It's very helpful actually. I know it's really hard to transition from the armchair to the ice, so anything would be appreciated.

In terms of equipment, if I am looking to get everything aside from a stick and skates, how much money can I be looking at on the cheap end?

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01-09-2011, 11:59 PM
  #7
adaminnj
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Here is a link to a set of winnwell glight pads

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/winnwell...-lite-sr1.html

I have the glight shins and they cost me almost as much as this set.
Great stuff and a great price.

Then all you would need is breasers (Hockey shorts), hockey socks, and a hockey jock or a regular jock and a guarder. and then a GOOD helmet.

I'm thinking you might be able to get what you need for around 300 bucks if you shop wisely.

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01-10-2011, 12:47 AM
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If you're not comfortable with your stick handling, I suggest getting a random piece of wood (Preferably finished) and big enough to stick handle on. The size of a cupboard door should suffice. If you live in Ottawa, then Deslaurier's might have some extra stuff like that around. Though, they could just be an office.

For about 5-10 minutes just "dribble" with the puck on it. It'll help you get a control of it, then before games practice and soon enough you'll be able to go top flight while stick handling great. Though, you could be fine with this already.

If you're going to be a winger, then your job is to watch the adjacent dman. (i.e you're right win, you watch left dman)

Personally, I find d tend to stay bout a foot inside the blue line. I like to stay about a foot and ahalf away from them, so if my d, or the centre losses a man and he gets tot he slot, I can potentially get to him in time to tie up his stick. Though, I'm not far enough away that the dman can get the pick and wire a good shot. If you have good acceleration speed, you might be able to cheat a bit more and move further down.

If you're center, it usually just consists of you shadowing the other centre. You gotta try to stay between him and the net when he doesn't have the puck and when he does get on him like glue.

In the offensive zone. If you're right wing and the right side dman pinches, or rushes the puck, you should stay back (unless it's been determined that the centre will cover for a pinching d. This has been the way on a team of mine before since I've played every position.)

If you're battling in the corner and the puck gets knocked behind the net to a teammate who has some room, go straight for the net.

If a teammate is battling in the corner and it's 1 on 1, get ready to give him an opening outlet pass from the corner. If you see one of their players go in to assist their player, then you join in. If both of your forward teammates are battling, then try to get into a position they can get you the puck to move. Whether it be on the boards between them and your d, or them and their net.

If there's a 2 on 2 going against your team and you're the next person on your team to re-enter your zone, then it's your job to take their next man. If you miss, or forget, no worries. NHL players forget this a ton. They're so focused on getting back that they forget the trailer is usually the most dangerous person.

If you plan to be a shot blocker, you'll want a good cup and shin pads. When blocking shots, try not to leave your stick on an angle if you know you can get your body in front of it, because you can deflect that into your face. Also, don't skate and lunge forward to drop on your knees. You can mess your knees up good with a shot that manages to hit your knees. I did this type of block once. Luckily the puck went higher, but the coach set me straight.

If you go to do the skate and slide block on your side, turn your face away. Also, practice (iff you can) putting a hand on your neck. I'm sure you'd rather have a broken hand than a crushed wind pipe.

You could go to a Kunstad sports (sp ?) to get your equipment, or some of it.

And, if you're going to skate 200 feet to make the player make a pass, why not skate 2 more feet and throw a hit ?

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01-10-2011, 10:00 AM
  #9
Curtinho
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I know this is going to come off as a really stupid question, and I know that I'm going to hear a lot of negative even for asking, but is it possible to start playing hockey at 23 and still make it into the NHL?

Believe me, I'm aware that the chances are slim to none. I'm not talking about what the chances are; I'm just wondering if it's within the realm of possibility. Everyone has delusions of grandeur when they play a sport, and most people don't take it very seriously when they say things like that (a lot of people do, and still don't make it.) I know people dedicate their entire lives to this game and don't make it...but again, I'm just wondering if it's possible at all if you have the talent and the drive can those missed years be made up?

I'll go get my flame retardant suit now.

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01-10-2011, 11:35 AM
  #10
doobie604
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CPhoenixM View Post
I know this is going to come off as a really stupid question, and I know that I'm going to hear a lot of negative even for asking, but is it possible to start playing hockey at 23 and still make it into the NHL?

Believe me, I'm aware that the chances are slim to none. I'm not talking about what the chances are; I'm just wondering if it's within the realm of possibility. Everyone has delusions of grandeur when they play a sport, and most people don't take it very seriously when they say things like that (a lot of people do, and still don't make it.) I know people dedicate their entire lives to this game and don't make it...but again, I'm just wondering if it's possible at all if you have the talent and the drive can those missed years be made up?

I'll go get my flame retardant suit now.
i would say there it's not possible at all. there are too many things to work on and too little time to get to the nhl level. i think mastering skating, shooting, passing, stick handling, taking hits, defensive position, on ice vision, etc is just way too tough when you're 23. if you ever play in beer league, you see guys that are pretty good, but they're nothing compare to jr or university players, and your normal jr/university players are nowhere near ahl players, guess what, nhl players are usually a lot better than the average ahl players.

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01-10-2011, 11:43 AM
  #11
Jarick
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No. You need to have complete mastery of all skills as well as incredible genetics, plus enough experience and practice to dedicate everything to muscle memory and instinct. However, you can still have a lot of fun just playing hockey recreationally.

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01-10-2011, 11:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CPhoenixM View Post
I know this is going to come off as a really stupid question, and I know that I'm going to hear a lot of negative even for asking, but is it possible to start playing hockey at 23 and still make it into the NHL?

Believe me, I'm aware that the chances are slim to none. I'm not talking about what the chances are; I'm just wondering if it's within the realm of possibility. Everyone has delusions of grandeur when they play a sport, and most people don't take it very seriously when they say things like that (a lot of people do, and still don't make it.) I know people dedicate their entire lives to this game and don't make it...but again, I'm just wondering if it's possible at all if you have the talent and the drive can those missed years be made up?

I'll go get my flame retardant suit now.
Well, if you were 6'2ish and had skill to be a 3rd liner in any league, but were a great fighter you could.

By age 31, or so you could be good enough for the Swiss league .

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01-10-2011, 12:53 PM
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Jarick
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Occasionally I wonder which countries' national teams I could play for. Maybe Swaziland? Madagascar? There's got to be some country that has fewer than 20 decent hockey players

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01-10-2011, 01:37 PM
  #14
Curtinho
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Thanks for all the replies guys.

Regardless, as a competitive person and someone that just loves hockey (it's never been affordable for me before) I'm going to try my best to be the best that I can be. As corny as that sounds...but I won't let the fun get away. If I get to play some competitive hockey at some point in my life I'll be happy (even if it's the lowest form!)

I wouldn't mind a cinderella NHL story though.

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Occasionally I wonder which countries' national teams I could play for. Maybe Swaziland? Madagascar? There's got to be some country that has fewer than 20 decent hockey players
Hahaha...yeah. I'm sure there's one out there just waiting for some unused talent.

So I found equipment packages online that total up to about $250. Here's the list:

Shoulder pads, elbow pads, and shin guards:
http://www.hockeymonkey.com/ccm-hock...-03-le-sr.html

Gloves:
http://www.hockeymonkey.com/bauer-ho...or-x20-sr.html

Helmet:
http://www.hockeymonkey.com/bauer-ho...lmet-5100.html

Pants:
http://www.hockeymonkey.com/bauer-ho...-one35-sr.html

Does this stuff seem ok for a beginner? I probably only need it to last me a couple years, or longer if possible. I plan on playing rec league this year/next year and then trying seeing where I am.

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07-26-2013, 06:16 AM
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Sorry for butting in but

I'm moving to Canada at the start of 2014, I'm going to be in a ski resort for a few months, but will be moving to Vancouver in April. I want to join a pick up / recreational league, all girls or co ed, but finding it hard to find solid info. Also I'm Irish, so I don't even know the in's and outs of how it works in Canada. I'm a beginner, have bout a years training.

Any help / local knowledge would be appreciated. Couple of by questions are:

What does it cost for a season? (Do you have to pay membership and more every training / game? What is this amount typically?

I'm thinking of North Vancouver or Kitsilano area, would there be reasonably priced recreational leagues / pick up games anywhere near?

Are summer seasons easy to find, or would I be waiting until the following Autumn?

What is the difference between recy and pick up? Do both include training?

Apologies if some of the questions seem stupid, but would appreciate any help.

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07-26-2013, 11:07 AM
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keysersoze98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Occasionally I wonder which countries' national teams I could play for. Maybe Swaziland? Madagascar? There's got to be some country that has fewer than 20 decent hockey players
A good read...My Week With The North Korean Hockey Team: http://deadspin.com/my-week-with-the...team-512306903

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07-26-2013, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Hockey Wannabe View Post
I'm moving to Canada at the start of 2014, I'm going to be in a ski resort for a few months, but will be moving to Vancouver in April. I want to join a pick up / recreational league, all girls or co ed, but finding it hard to find solid info. Also I'm Irish, so I don't even know the in's and outs of how it works in Canada. I'm a beginner, have bout a years training.
Planet Ice, Coast Hockey and ASHL all have Coed or women divisions I believe, and I play in Surrey at the CoEd hockey league out of the city of Surrey, which is aimed towards beginners and intermediates. The first three have multiple divisions though, so you might be able to find one that fits your skill level in any of them.


Quote:
What does it cost for a season? (Do you have to pay membership and more every training / game? What is this amount typically?
~$15-30 per game over the course of a season. The league I'm playing in this Fall, for example, is 17 games long, once a week, from September to March (with a few breaks!). It's about $260, and they include team jerseys, so that's a pretty good deal. In some (most) leagues they'll need you to provide your own jerseys, which cost what you pay for them. Some leagues even want matching socks, so you'll be back another $10-15 there.

There are no practices/trainings in most leagues unless your team goes about it on their own (rents rink time and organizes a practice).

Quote:
I'm thinking of North Vancouver or Kitsilano area, would there be reasonably priced recreational leagues / pick up games anywhere near?
I don't know what the rink situation is like in North Van/Kits but I assume there'll be some ASHL there and maybe Coast Hockey League. The leagues are all fairly similarly priced, and a lot of it will come down to how many games you'll play. For example, here is Coast's website:
http://www.coasthockey.com/

If you go to the league info, you'll see that it's $750. That seems a lot steeper than the $260 I pay at the Coed league in Surrey, but you'll notice that at Coast you're playing 24 regular season games and at least 1 playoff, so it's actually about $28 per game. Still more, but in that 15-30 range per game. If you're looking to go cheap (and I'd recommend that for your first season, because if it's a rough experience and you find the skill level is all wrong you won't have wanted to make a big financial investment) I'd find a cheap, short option.

Quote:
Are summer seasons easy to find, or would I be waiting until the following Autumn?
They're not impossible to find, but definitely harder. A lot start in Spring and run into Summer. I'm sure there would be a short one out there!

Quote:
What is the difference between recy and pick up? Do both include training?
Rec is short for Recreational League, which is an actually hockey league with (hopefully!) referees, scorekeepers and persistent teams throughout a season. Pick up is just a one-off game where you go, sign up, and set up teams your own way and play a one-off game with whoever is there. There generally aren't refs and it's usually pretty laid-back and casual. Obviously that wouldn't have training, and as I said above, Rec league won't have any unless your team pays extra and sets it up on the side.

Quote:
Apologies if some of the questions seem stupid, but would appreciate any help.
Hopefully some of that helped!

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