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February 13,1984 Red Fisher Column - Vladislav Tretiak

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07-27-2013, 11:44 AM
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Canadiens1958
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February 13,1984 Red Fisher Column - Vladislav Tretiak

Vladislav Tretiak was drafted by the Canadiens in the 7th round of the 1983 Draft. Red Fisher offers opinions on the possibility of Vladislav Tretiak ever playing for the Canadiens:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...2994%2C1263469

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07-27-2013, 11:48 AM
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February 20, 1984 Michael Farber Article

Later Michael Farber offers some insight:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...1016%2C4521817

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07-27-2013, 12:12 PM
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Killion
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Certainly wouldve been fascinating, to see how he faired, held up consistently & over-time playing the North American game for sure. It was such a different time, period. Had he been permitted to bring his family, integrating into society with support systems in place, what mightve been huh? Like a lot of the great Soviet players really, late 50's through the 70's.

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07-29-2013, 01:37 PM
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Its truly upsetting to see so many great hockey players never have a shot at the NHL. I remember hearing that Tretiak and Kharlamov, specifically just to name a few, were highly interested in playing in North America wanting a new challenge.

Tretiak was actually very close to leaving by 83-84 but in the last minute the Soviet officials had changed their mind. Tretiak still played out of his mind, in some of his best games after that, but he was upset to have lost that chance. He retired shortly after but probably would have stayed in the NHL longer.

Tretiak already proved himself as a NHL caliber goalie. One of the best in the world proving it against NHL all stars, NHL clubs and WHA all stars.

He was probably one of the most fittest players in the NHL of that time. North America was def lackadaisical in its fitness approach of that time compared to the Soviet Union. Actually many pro sports derived their modern day training from their routines and schedule.

The goalies of the SU were known as some of the fittest men on the team historically. Always focused in on as the most important position. I heard if Tretiak let in one goal during practice he would force himself to stay after and do a ton of work outs. Dont want to ask if it was more than a goal. One goal would have the coach wonder what was wrong lol.

So I think experience, leadership, fitness, skill was of no issue. He was one of the best who retired young due to boredom and issues with politics.

He would have joined in 83-84 at least. They just slipped into the playoffs but who knows what they would have done with Tretiak. The goalie I saw was not that strong and they had just drafted Naslund.

The year after the team took #1 in the division. But their goalies were still subpar. Its hard to imagine what Tretiak would have done for them the first 2 years...

Edmonton was just becoming a super power. In my eyes they were probably the best team of all time. Its hard for me to say the Canadiens would have won, though I do think Tretiak would have gotten a Cup sooner or later.

He probably would have won at least 1 Vezina my eyes and made it to the finals at least once too.
He probably would have have retired (32 in reality) in about 4 years.

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07-29-2013, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thesensation19 View Post
Its truly upsetting to see so many great hockey players never have a shot at the NHL. I remember hearing that Tretiak and Kharlamov, specifically just to name a few, were highly interested in playing in North America wanting a new challenge.

Tretiak was actually very close to leaving by 83-84 but in the last minute the Soviet officials had changed their mind. Tretiak still played out of his mind, in some of his best games after that, but he was upset to have lost that chance. He retired shortly after but probably would have stayed in the NHL longer.

Tretiak already proved himself as a NHL caliber goalie. One of the best in the world proving it against NHL all stars, NHL clubs and WHA all stars.

He was probably one of the most fittest players in the NHL of that time. North America was def lackadaisical in its fitness approach of that time compared to the Soviet Union. Actually many pro sports derived their modern day training from their routines and schedule.

The goalies of the SU were known as some of the fittest men on the team historically. Always focused in on as the most important position. I heard if Tretiak let in one goal during practice he would force himself to stay after and do a ton of work outs. Dont want to ask if it was more than a goal. One goal would have the coach wonder what was wrong lol.

He would have joined in 83-84 at least. They just slipped into the playoffs but who knows what they would have done with Tretiak. The goalie I saw was not that strong and they had just drafted Naslund.

The year after the team took #1 in the division. But their goalies were still subpar. Its hard to imagine what Tretiak would have done for them the first 2 years...

Edmonton was just becoming a super power. In my eyes they were probably the best team of all time. Its hard for me to say the Canadiens would have won, though I do think Tretiak would have gotten a Cup sooner or later.

He probably would have won at least 1 Vezina my eyes and made it to the finals at least once too.
He probably would have have retired (32 in reality) in about 4 years.
1. AFAIK Kharlamov never expressed a particular interest in playing in the NHL. In fact, he was offered to play for Montreal and jokingly said "I can't without Petrov and Mikhailov." A joke, but still.

2. Montreal did well in goal in the 80s. Don't remember who their goalie was...

3. CSKA had no problem defeating the Oilers in 1985.

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07-29-2013, 03:19 PM
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Ya, its interesting. Tikhonov while publicly voicing his support of Russian players heading to North America & playing in the NHL was one thing but privately long speculated he was working another track behind the scenes with Soviet Officialdom. That CSKA Team was part of the armed forces, Tikhonov a General. The players were confined to Barracks for a good 10 months of the year, this guy one very serious taskmaster. And as he was also Coach of the National Team, he cut Mogilny, Fedorov, Bure' & Zelepukin amongst others fearing theyd defect through the later 80's & just prior to the dissolution of the Soviet Union if given the opportunity when playing in Europe, the States or Canada. Id say there was no chance Tretiak was ever going to be given the opportunity at that time.

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07-29-2013, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel View Post
1. AFAIK Kharlamov never expressed a particular interest in playing in the NHL. In fact, he was offered to play for Montreal and jokingly said "I can't without Petrov and Mikhailov." A joke, but still.

2. Montreal did well in goal in the 80s. Don't remember who their goalie was...

3. CSKA had no problem defeating the Oilers in 1985.

1_ I read somewhere he had interest. It could be jokingly, but nonetheless I cannot find it. I think I read it in a book. But even if it was not as jokingly as you make it seem, he probably just expressed a slight interest at best. I guess he had no reason to leave really. Kinda. What a great player though.

2_ Yes. Montreal finally got their goalie in Roy. But that was a year later in 1984 where they drafted him. Who knows if Montreal would have drafted him if Tretiak decided to come and impressed the Canadiens. Since Tretiak was already 32, chances are they still could of... Anyway, he didnt get real minutes until 1985 anyway. I am just saying that Tretiak serving in net from 83 to until he retires could have been a MORE dangerous team. Am I wrong? Penney and others who tried net after Dryden was below sub-par.


3_ Moscow destroyed a very young Edmonton team in 1980. Edmonton then beat the USSR in 1984? Then Moscow beat Edmonton again in what seemed to be their start of their dynasty.

So yes your right. You make a great point. But anyone can beat anyone in one game. It is much tougher in a series, especially best of 7 and that which is the NHL playoffs. Idk if Montreal would have beaten the Oilers in that time... I could very well be wrong. Either way, I think Tretiak would have given them a great fight.

I think Tretiak would have won at least 1 Vezina as well. In less than 4 years after the age of 32.


Real shame he never came over. But I am not one to believe the NHL is the ONE AND ONLY... So I am happy what Tretiak and others did for European hockey

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07-29-2013, 04:08 PM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jeTuWHAcRM

This is a great game. Wish I could watch in full.
Moscow vs Edmonton.

Just because Moscow beat them, does not mean Montreal with Tretiak would have too. And it does not mean that Moscow is better. It means they won the game and were better that night.

Though this 10 minute video I think truly highlights how good the Soviets were individually but more importantly how good they were as a team and in that system. Very well underrated I believe. They were not bigger so one on one battles were tough, but they were probably just as strong. Yet they were terribly faster in many areas of the game.

I hope the NHL does more and more of this especially now that Kovalchuk is back in Russia.

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07-30-2013, 02:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Thesensation19 View Post
3_ Moscow destroyed a very young Edmonton team in 1980. Edmonton then beat the USSR in 1984? Then Moscow beat Edmonton again in what seemed to be their start of their dynasty.
It was Moscow Dynamo in 1980 (they beat the Oilers 4-1). Then Edmonton beat the touring Soviet national team 4-3 in 1982; Myshkin, instead of Tretiak, was the Soviet goalie in that one
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Psx9XnaA-mY
And then CSKA Moscow (with a couple of extra players from other team[s]) beat the Oilers 6-3 in 1985. Paul Coffey especially was a disaster in the game.
EDIT: BTW, the full 1985 game is available on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xQAQ...=TLGInqJfg2V9M
The 'YouTuber' MrVasilenkoK has downloaded basically all the significant USSR/CSKA vs. Canada/NHL games


Last edited by VMBM: 07-30-2013 at 02:30 AM.
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07-30-2013, 07:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel View Post
1. AFAIK Kharlamov never expressed a particular interest in playing in the NHL. In fact, he was offered to play for Montreal and jokingly said "I can't without Petrov and Mikhailov." A joke, but still.

2. Montreal did well in goal in the 80s. Don't remember who their goalie was...

3. CSKA had no problem defeating the Oilers in 1985.
Between Dryden's retirement in 1979, and Roy's emergence, outside of Steve Penney's unlikely run in the 1984 playoffs, the Habs did not get very good goaltending. One of the main reasons for their poor playoff performances post Dryden.

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