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Tryouts/Evaluations/Making of teams

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10-01-2013, 03:39 PM
  #1
Slats432
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Tryouts/Evaluations/Making of teams

I don't know how many have gone through the process with tryouts etc.

My son tried out for Peewee AA rep. Last cut...down to house. Process was good to go through, but some parents said there is some bias as to how the teams were made.

I tell my son to not give the evaluators any choice.

How was your evaluations?

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10-01-2013, 04:44 PM
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CornKicker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slats432 View Post
I don't know how many have gone through the process with tryouts etc.

My son tried out for Peewee AA rep. Last cut...down to house. Process was good to go through, but some parents said there is some bias as to how the teams were made.

I tell my son to not give the evaluators any choice.

How was your evaluations?
politics in minor hockey are always going to be there, its too bad but its just the way it is when entire orgs are run off of volunteers.

youre advice is sound and really all you can do.

my oldest made a team higher than i thought he would and im pretty proud.

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10-02-2013, 12:11 PM
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intangible
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Only let in a single goal during a pro tryout; next goalie (ECHLer) let in 3. They ended up taking a goalie who let in like 7-9 all weekend. Disappointed, but I wasn't planning on making the team, anyway.

As for minor hockey, politics are huge, but ultimately if you/your child is that good, he/she will get picked up. I grew up on the wrong side of the river in my hometown; all the hockey was on the east, and I lived in the west. I had to go to tryouts hundreds of miles away just to get a shot. Looking back, though, there were good goalies here, and had I been THAT much better than them, I would've gotten taken regardless. I just wasn't THAT much better, so it was easy for them to make the political choice. Keep working hard, sign up for other opportunities to get exposure. There's more than one team out there.

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10-02-2013, 07:05 PM
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Timmer44
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I've picked a few teams, might be little late but I have a couple suggestions to make a mid level player stand out. I've come to notice that there are normally 3 tiers of player at a tryout. The standout best players, and the obvious worst players, and everyone in between gets lumped into one group. The trick is to stand out from the middle ground. I don't evaluate goalies so I can't help with that.
  • How you follow instruction is a good indicator if you will be coachable or not. Do the drills/instruction during scrimmages right. Pay attention.
  • Be noticed. Wear a piece of equipment that will make you stand out (This can hurt as well). Don't stand at the back of the line during the drills.
  • Effort level is important. If you screw up, hit the brakes and make an obvious effort to get back into the play. A screw up will be forgotten if there is a high effort level.
  • Similarly, body language is important. Don't slump shoulders and slap stick on the ice. Personally, I think poorly of that.

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10-02-2013, 07:09 PM
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Jisatsu
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One thing that a lot of coaches look for (good or bad) is experience. Unfortunately you see a lot of crap players being carried through try outs and seasons based on where they played in the past. The best advice I can give anyone trying out for a team is to work hard and push yourself 100% of the time. Ask questions often and pay attention to the coaching staff. Work hard and play hard, but never give up. If you end up being cut, play as hard as you can in the next level down so next year at try outs you can show what your hard work can produce. Don't let a cut from a team ruin the game for you and learn from the experience.

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10-06-2013, 10:36 PM
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Gerin
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Been cut from countless amount of teams because of politics and ect. I now play Jrs and most the guys who made those teams haven't played since minor hockey. This is not me trying to brag just saying never give up on what you enjoy. I also recently was an evaluator for minor hockey this year for the first few sessions at a minor hockey try out. Rated the players basics skills off a number scale (skating, shooting, puck skills, checking, ect) but as said before its important to try and be the first ones in the drills an never quit on plays to help stand out

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