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How Pavel Bure Almost Became the Next Face of the NHL as of 1995.

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Old
11-03-2013, 01:30 AM
  #26
Syckle78
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I really dislike arguments such as 'your memory is distorted '. It's a cheap cop out that's impossible to argue against. You're basically blowing off what we watched and know about the player from that time period. He was a great player, I'm glad he made it into the hall. That said I dont see the need to try and make him into something he wasn't.

Also, if one young Russian was going to be the face of the league it was going to be Fedorov. He was getting theESPN time and showing up in mainstream media. Nike also had a big time campaign for him
Bureau may have been a rock star in Vancouver but Feds was much more popular everywhere else.

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11-03-2013, 05:57 AM
  #27
the edler
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Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Unfortunately, I think you're wrong. I've seen JetsAlternate claim that Bure was "an excellent two-way player," and "an above average defensive player."
I can't speak for the OP, but sometimes to defend a view you have to fight fire with a little bit of fire, or exagerrations with some small exaggerations of your own. Bure gets trashed so much at times us fans gets a bit defensive, and sensitive.

I don't think Bure was "an excellent two-way player" or "an above average defensive player" myself, and of course he was bad defensively if you compare him to Dirk Graham or Jere Lehtinen. If you compare him to contemporary high scoring wingers of the 90s though, like Jagr, Selänne, Hull, Robitaille, Mogilny, Neely and Recchi, one could actually say he was "slightly above average" in his own zone, at his best. Up thread, for example, you could see two coaches in the league who picked him as the best penalty killer in the league. And even though I wouldn't consent to that opinion, because there's different kinds of playing on the PK, he definitely was one of the best offensive PKers. And it's still mostly a defensive situation. You can't really cherry pick a lot in those situations, but only play on the edge. And I guess that's why Jagr and Selänne didn't play much in those situations.

Even in 97–98, when his defensive demise is said to have really started, he still led the team in plus and minus, except for Zezel and McCabe who played 20 games each, so it wasn't really only his fault the team sucked. And in Florida, who outside of 99–00 was a really mediocre to bad team, he still came out as a plus player.

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11-03-2013, 07:24 AM
  #28
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Bure was just fine without the puck as a Canuck from what I remember.

The cherry picking reputation is just being extended back from Florida in people's mind imo.

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11-03-2013, 03:08 PM
  #29
JetsAlternate
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Originally Posted by Syckle78 View Post
I really dislike arguments such as 'your memory is distorted '. It's a cheap cop out that's impossible to argue against. You're basically blowing off what we watched and know about the player from that time period. He was a great player, I'm glad he made it into the hall. That said I dont see the need to try and make him into something he wasn't.

Also, if one young Russian was going to be the face of the league it was going to be Fedorov. He was getting theESPN time and showing up in mainstream media. Nike also had a big time campaign for him
Bureau may have been a rock star in Vancouver but Feds was much more popular everywhere else.
I've provided a substantial amount of evidence from all types of sources to support Pavel's two-way game in Vancouver. We've established that few people could watch him in his Vancouver days; while you saw him in Florida after the league started airing games nationwide on a regular basis, a lot of the early material is lost. The resistance to all of this information is upsetting, as simply watching the games themselves would be enough to understand the type of player he was early in his career (and, for that matter, late in his career as Rangers fans will tell you). As some people have misremembered the details of Pavel's 50th goal in 1997-98, I can say for certain some things have been forgotten and distorted. Pavel never "leaped like a mad man after scoring his goal in a blowout loss" -- he opened the scoring that game. Some people these days will say that Pavel was not a two-way player in New York. It's clear from simply looking back at what was said at the time that Pavel was a two-way player as a Ranger. People have ignored this information, though it all exists. Not many people had a chance to watch Pavel outside of Vancouver when he was here -- television deals here were primitive, to say the least. Nobody in the East would have seen him play; all they would have seen were highlights.

I've begun work on a new analysis video of Bure's play.

Here's a sample of some of the shifts I'll be featuring, taken from Wayne Gretzky's 802nd goal milestone game. It really just shows how easy it is to find footage of Pavel playing a strong two-way game though few have looked. Everyone recognizes this game, and it's another piece of evidence of Pavel's two-way game that is far too often overlooked.

I've only gotten through a portion of the first period and this isn't anyway near being the final product; I've barely started my work on this one, and in fact, it's an unlisted video. I'll be looking at various aspects of Pavel's game. I'd like you to have a look at this, though, as it's a brief taste of what I'll be releasing soon. This is early Pavel Bure.



Last edited by JetsAlternate: 11-03-2013 at 03:30 PM.
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11-03-2013, 07:59 PM
  #30
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Why are we talking about Bure's two way game in Vancouver so much? Whatever claim he could make to be the next face of the NHL, it was all predicated on his explosive, spectacular offense and the success the Canucks derived from that, not how much of a well rounded player he was. And as amazing as his sophomore season and third year was, he wasn't separating himself from the other greats of the time. The failure of the Mogilny experiment, the knee injury and the Canucks going in the toilet really torpedoed the momentum he had early in his career.

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11-03-2013, 08:21 PM
  #31
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Why are we talking about Bure's two way game in Vancouver so much? Whatever claim he could make to be the next face of the NHL, it was all predicated on his explosive, spectacular offense and the success the Canucks derived from that, not how much of a well rounded player he was. And as amazing as his sophomore season and third year was, he wasn't separating himself from the other greats of the time. The failure of the Mogilny experiment, the knee injury and the Canucks going in the toilet really torpedoed the momentum he had early in his career.
You are absolutely right that the focus of his popularity was on his offensive abilities. The fact Bettman wanted to "make Pavel happen" is just a sign of the possibilities based around his popularity. Quinn swore he would find Pavel a centerman -- the rotation of linemates he had really did not help. Craven, Momesso, (Anatoli) Semenov, Adams, Odjick, etc.

The knee injury triggered the decline of Pavel's marketing potential and also threw his career into a major spiral. He and Mogilny were only teammates for a month before Pavel's injury against Chicago on November 9, 1995. Upon Pavel's return at the start of the 1996-97 season, he sustained a neck injury on opening night that affected him for the entire season. Then in 1997-98, Mogilny began the year injured and upon returning underperformed to a great extent while Pavel played with Mark Messier and Markus Naslund. I'd say injuries derailed that experiment to a large degree as much as one wants to say they didn't click.

Injuries robbed him of the mid-1990s.

Perhaps it is also the fascination with Pavel's offensive abilities that caused some of the "lesser details" to be overlooked. He is defined by his offensive skills, and with the lack of the type of media coverage or comprehensive analysis we have today, a lot of the other details were missed, particularly his intelligence on the ice.

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11-03-2013, 08:44 PM
  #32
TheDevilMadeMe
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I agree that Fedorov was much closer to becoming the face of the NHL than Bure, at least in the United States. He was a higher-tier star than Bure, played in a bigger market, and was just as handsome and flamboyant

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11-03-2013, 08:56 PM
  #33
vadim sharifijanov
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I agree that Fedorov was much closer to becoming the face of the NHL than Bure, at least in the United States. He was a higher-tier star than Bure, played in a bigger market, and was just as handsome and flamboyant
that's probably true. i'd argue that bure looked better on sportscenter, but hockey was pretty buried on sportscenter so it probably didn't make much of a difference.

but as i recall, north america just wasn't ready for a soviet-born face of the game yet. i don't often credit the NHL with making the smart marketing play, but in that instance, not pushing fedorov, or bure, or jagr, or any other soviet bloc guy, was the right move commercially speaking.

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11-03-2013, 10:32 PM
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I agree that Fedorov was much closer to becoming the face of the NHL than Bure, at least in the United States. He was a higher-tier star than Bure, played in a bigger market, and was just as handsome and flamboyant
lol, no he wasn't.

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11-03-2013, 10:33 PM
  #35
TheDevilMadeMe
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lol, no he wasn't.
lol, yes he was.

Where was Bure's Hart Trophy, again?

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11-03-2013, 10:37 PM
  #36
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lol, yes he was.

Where was Bure's Hart Trophy, again?
Gretzky, Lemieux, and Jagr were in a tier above for stardom - Fedorov and Bure were in the next tier along with Selanne, Forsberg, Kariya etc.

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11-04-2013, 01:56 AM
  #37
the edler
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The failure of the Mogilny experiment
I don't know if I would put the Mogilny and Bure failure too much on any of the players. Not only because of the injuries, but Mogilny and Bure were too much the same kind of player at RW for it to work properly, 5 and 7 years into their NHL careers. In the Soviet league and the one World Junior tournament where Mogilny and Bure played on the same line, Bure was a LW, at least in the 89 Worlds Juniors I've seen clips of him roam the left side, and in his first season in Vancouver he did alternate LW and RW, but from then on he was strictly RW. I think the management misread that one and went "nostalgic". It would have been like trying to play Bondra and Selänne on the same line, or Bure and Bondra, or Oates and H Sedin. Bure had some nice chemistry with Greg Adams, and worked well with Kozlov.

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11-04-2013, 05:30 AM
  #38
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I recall Nike doing a marketing survey around that time, and their conclusion was that Fedorov was going to be the next face of the NHL.

He had the looks, skills, talent and played in a big US market.

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11-04-2013, 06:06 AM
  #39
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But Fedorov, like Bure, had that Greta Garbo type of appeal. Looks, but not very outgoing, and not the clownish Groucho Marx appeal of an Alex Ovechkin.

NHL could have marketed the new dynamic duo instead.


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11-04-2013, 06:23 AM
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And even when Ovechkin was clearly a step up from Crosby (2007-08 to 2009-10), I don't think he ever really was "the face" of the NHL in a way Crosby is today. Tough to be the face of a North American league as a Russian.
If Ovechkin had looked liked Bure or Fedorov he probably would have blown Crosby off the map for marketing in 2009.The personality is a big thing too, remember Bure was very private when he was a player. Ovechkin is very open , approachable although he sometimes tries too hard(honestly it would be difficult for anyone to hit exactly the right note)

Player with looks like young Bure/Fedorov/Mogilny/Yzerman, personality of Ovechkin, prpriety of Lidstrom, hockey skills of any of the elite forwards would eat marketing alive regardless of place of birth. Although nationality is a factor for the home ton feel for some people, there will be others who like the mystique of a foreign guy.

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11-04-2013, 06:24 AM
  #41
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Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
I agree that Fedorov was much closer to becoming the face of the NHL than Bure, at least in the United States. He was a higher-tier star than Bure, played in a bigger market, and was just as handsome and flamboyant
He was second fiddle to Yzerman though by optinion of most.

Also disagree about looks,Fedorov was good looking but Bure was insanely jaw dropping good looking.

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11-04-2013, 10:32 AM
  #42
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I understand the point but please tell me this "who is more good looking" talk won't continue I

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11-04-2013, 11:12 AM
  #43
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I don't know if I would put the Mogilny and Bure failure too much on any of the players. Not only because of the injuries, but Mogilny and Bure were too much the same kind of player at RW for it to work properly, 5 and 7 years into their NHL careers. In the Soviet league and the one World Junior tournament where Mogilny and Bure played on the same line, Bure was a LW, at least in the 89 Worlds Juniors I've seen clips of him roam the left side, and in his first season in Vancouver he did alternate LW and RW, but from then on he was strictly RW. I think the management misread that one and went "nostalgic". It would have been like trying to play Bondra and Selänne on the same line, or Bure and Bondra, or Oates and H Sedin. Bure had some nice chemistry with Greg Adams, and worked well with Kozlov.
as i recall, what frustrated fans was that rick ley didn't even try bure and mogilny on the same line, except on the PP. and, as you say, it makes sense to spread the talent around, especially when both guys are at their best at the same position. but i think the common refrain was, geez could you just try it out once to see if some of the magic's still there?

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11-04-2013, 11:55 AM
  #44
the edler
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as i recall, what frustrated fans was that rick ley didn't even try bure and mogilny on the same line, except on the PP. and, as you say, it makes sense to spread the talent around, especially when both guys are at their best at the same position. but i think the common refrain was, geez could you just try it out once to see if some of the magic's still there?
Did Keenan try them on a line in 97–98? I didn't watch a whole lot of games in those ugly Messier years.

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11-04-2013, 12:16 PM
  #45
vadim sharifijanov
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Did Keenan try them on a line in 97–98? I didn't watch a whole lot of games in those ugly Messier years.
not to my recollection. i mean, he probably did at some point, but they weren't often healthy at the same time, and almost never at full speed at the same time.

but my big memory is before the season, with our new russian superstar, and about to open our brand new arena, with this image--



-- on the side of every bus and on every billboard in the city, pat quinn announces to everyone that rick ley's decided that bure and mogilny aren't going to play on the same line. the city was livid when it turned out he wasn't bluffing. poor rick ley (a terrible coach but still...), totally set up to be fired.

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11-04-2013, 02:12 PM
  #46
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Yep, during the 1995-'96 preseason, Rick Ley tried to shift Mogilny over to the left side to play with Bure. It didn't work well at all--the players didn't click and Mogilny looked lost and tentative.

Then Mogilny got shifted over to a line with Cliff Ronning and Roman Oksiuta and scored something like 8 points in their first 3 regular season games together. He just looked like a completely different player out there. Then Bure blew out his knee a few weeks later and that was that.

I also seem to remember a game or two in 1996-97 when Tom Renney put Bure and Mogilny back together--there might have been a night in St. Louis when the two clicked and combined for a few points. But generally it didn't work. For whatever reason, Mogilny seemed to play better when he was the focal point of a line.

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11-05-2013, 02:23 AM
  #47
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Pavel and Alex only had 15 games together before the former's injury on November 9, 1995. Chemistry takes time. Ley was fired before the following season.

Now, as for anyone who claims to have seen Bure when he was a Vancouver Canuck, and particularly prior to his 1995 injury, let's take a look at the TV deals the Canucks had in place at the time.

Unless you were living in Vancouver and had BCTV on your list of channels, you would have hardly ever had a chance to watch the Canucks. CBC and TSN, combined, only carried 10 or so Canucks games each season; American viewers would not have watched the Canucks unless they played their own local team. Even the local station itself, BCTV, might have only carried 15-20 games per season. Frankly, those who had a chance to watch Pavel on a regular basis did it live, and those who watched him on TV in BC saw him once a week. Anyone outside of British Columbia would not have seen him; the rest of Canada would have seen him very rarely, hardly enough to actually evaluate his game. On American television, no games at all would have been shown aside from one or or two per year against each local team.

If people think some current players in the league are under-appreciated or misunderstood, this was on a whole other level.
Quote:
SPORTS MAILBAG: [Final Edition]
The Province [Vancouver, B.C] 19 Sep 1994: A29.

...

VANCOUVER

In Fanfare (Sept. 13), why do the Vancouver sports media continue to whine about the sports network being the Toronto Sports Network? Sure, they're bound to show quite a few eastern events and teams (like the Maple Leafs), but what's wrong with that?

Why don't the media pick on the Canucks broadcasters, BCTV and CHEK? While the Lower Mainland gets about 20 games on CHEK, the rest of the province gets only around 10 games a year on BCTV.
Quote:
NHL lockout would be 'devastating' to television, radio
MacLEOD, ROBERT; Campbell, Neil A; McKEE, TOM. The Globe and Mail [Toronto, Ont] 23 Sep 1994: C.14.

...

Most Canadian networks and stations that hold regional NHL TV rights would simply switch to regular programming if a lockout becomes reality. Ontario's Global Television Network, which is contracted to broadcast a schedule of Toronto Maple Leafs games, has a strong lineup of regular prime-time programming.

So does Vancouver-based BCTV.

...

BCTV is supposed to do 15 Canucks games this season with CHEK, the CTV affiliate in Victoria, slated for another eight.
Quote:
Recipes remain same: Only changes cosmetic in hockey telecast 'biz: [Final Edition]
Bacchus, Lee. The Province [Vancouver, B.C] 04 Sep 1993: S6.

...

John McKeachie joins the BCTV-CHEK team of Jim Robson and Tom Larscheid as host for all of their 22 televised games home and away.
And here's a look at how many games were on CBC and TSN in 1991-92: six for CBC, two for TSN. For the Canucks, there was no national audience.

Quote:
Upshot is Canucks not on TV: [1* Edition]
Bacchus, Lee. The Province [Vancouver, B.C] 13 Mar 1992: B10.

We started out with a simple question: Why isn't Hockey Night in Canada picking up the Canucks at Calgary on Saturday?

Soon, we were wading through a sticky swampland of answers and risking the deadly quicksand of incomprehension. Then, out of the fog came the Phantom press release.

First we went to Dave Moorhead, CBC Sports publicist.

"Dave, what's the deal? How come we're getting L.A. and Montreal when we could have this potential first-round playoff preview for Western Canadians?"

"I sympathize with all the Vancouver fans out there," Moorhead said on Thursday via phone from Toronto. "But sometimes they don't realize all the factors that go into the scheduling."

Moorhead said the Vancouver Canucks themselves limit the number of games that can be televised. This year it was 30 games: 22 for BCTV/CHEK; six for CBC and two for TSN.

But Dave, we said, what about the recent Vancouver-Hartford game that seemingly was added at the last minute?

"That was originally pencilled in at the start of the season," Moorhead said. He added the game was held in check until the network could confirm it wouldn't conflict with Olympic preparations.

Moorhead also said this latest Canucks game was not included in the schedule because of a shortage this weekend of CBC technicians, many of whom are working curling's Brier, the downhill ski race at Panorama, as well as the two HNIC games in Montreal and Toronto.

"We try to do the best job that we can," pleaded Moorhead, who admitted he receives the most complaints about hockey coverage from the West.
At the time, making sure fans went to the games was a huge factor, and there were talks the Canucks would have went to an all pay-per-view format:

Quote:
Pay per view on horizon for Canucks: [1* Edition]
Jamieson, Jim. The Province [Vancouver, B.C] 11 Dec 1992: B3.

...

Ringdal confirmed the hockey club is in a position to move into the pay-per-view market next season - its deal with BCTV to selectively televise a package of Canucks games expires after this season and the B.C. pay-per-view licence is held by associated company Western International Communicatons Ltd. (WIC) - but isn't likely to do so.

"Pay per view is a place where we are going in the future," said Ringdal. "I can't say how quickly, but in the next several years. Next year is possible, but I wouldn't say probable."

A hockey fan's nightmare is a scenario where all games are on pay TV, but Ringdal said he can't foresee that.

...

Ringdal said filling the rink is the top priority, and that any TV package has to fit into that equation.

...

Ringdal said it's still undetermined how much a pay-per-view game might cost a home viewer, as the production costs and whatever deal was made with the major carrier and the cable outlet would factor in.

"Pay per view takes a lot of its own marketing and audience development," he said. "You really have to have product that's going to move before you can make any money. Two other partners end up taking a share of the revenue - namely, the major carrier (WIC) and the cable company that actually delivers it into the home. So, while it may be a $15 ticket, the hockey club may be getting only $5 or $6."
In the 1980s, the Canucks resisted having hockey featured on television, the reason being "hockey on TV threatens ticket sales." This just shows how difficult it was to watch the Canucks; this mentality, as we see above, bled into the 1990s and kept the number of games on TV very low.

Quote:
Marketing mystery: Argos off TV 38 days: [FIN Edition]
Ken McKee Toronto Star. Toronto Star [Toronto, Ont] 12 Sep 1986: F8.

...

Concerned that overexposure of hockey, and especially themselves, on TV is a threat to the franchise, the Canucks have dropped their midweek TV package with BCTV. Only four Canucks games are scheduled for local consumption on the tube this season.

Hockey in this country has traditionally avoided local blackouts.

"The team has been struggling," Art Griffiths, assistant to the Canucks' chairman (his father, Frank) explained. "That is certainly part of (the declining attendance). People figure they can always get tickets for any game they want to attend, and can watch the rest on TV.

"We're sending out a message that the only way to see our home games is to buy a ticket. We may add some telecasts of road games later on, but no more home games."

Speaking of TV overexposure, there will be no Saturday night games played in Winnipeg this season. Hockey Night in Canada has Saturdays with a no-blackout contract.
Quote:
Canucks on TV: [3* Edition]
The Vancouver Sun [Vancouver, B.C] 17 Aug 1988: C2.

The Vancouver Canucks will be on BCTV 15 times again this coming NHL season, with the defending Stanley Cup champion - and Gretzky-less - Edmonton Oilers appearing four times. Eight of the 15 games will be on Wednesdays while three are scheduled on Sundays, two on Tuesdays and one apiece Monday and Friday.
In fact, it wasn't until the 1998-99 season that the Canucks began to be aired on television more often. One can thank the deal with VTV:

Quote:
Canucks strike gold with television deal
Kerr, Grant. The Globe and Mail [Toronto, Ont] 09 Apr 1998: S.2.

VANCOUVER - The Vancouver Canucks may have missed the playoffs again, but they've hit hockey's version of a home run when it comes to local television.

After more than 20 years of association with British Columbia Television, the Canucks will move their regional telecasts to the new Baton Broadcasting Inc. station called Vancouver Television next season.

VTV will telecast 27 to 30 Canucks games in the National Hockey League in 1998-99, along with 24 games of the Vancouver Grizzlies of the National Basketball Association.

...

BCTV paid an estimated $1.7-million to carry Canucks games this season and it was reported locally that VTV bid $2.7-million a year for the hockey rights.
The numbers additionally went up in 1996-97 with the introduction of Canucks pay-per-view broadcasts. The first year, the Canucks aired four pay-per-view games as those games would otherwise have not been shown at all on TV.

Quote:
Fans buy into Orca TV: [Final Edition]
Taylor, Don. The Province [Vancouver, B.C] 16 Dec 1997: A47.

(Don Taylor is a host of Global TV's Sports Page, Sundays through Fridays at 11 p.m.)

The Vancouver Canucks' 1997-98 pay-per-view television schedule begins a week from today.

That's when the Canucks host the Dallas Stars in the first of four home games being offered on pay-per-view channel Viewers' Choice.

The Canucks' other pay-per-view dates include Feb. 2 against Colorado, March 24 against the Islanders and April 1 against Edmonton.

The cost is $9.95 for a single game or $34.95 for a four-game package, which includes four bonus movies. Orders can be placed at your local cable company.

Okay then, now that the free advertisement for Orca Bay portion of this column is over and done with, I can go about asking the first question that comes to mind on the subject: Who in their right mind would pay to watch the Canucks on television?

...

"I'm not all that worried," said Chris Hebb, Orca Bay's vice- president of broadcasting. "The Canucks have great fans, the best in the NHL. Win or lose, they want to watch their team play."

That certainly was the case last season when the Canucks made their inaugural attempt at pay-per-view telecasts. The club, despite its on-ice struggles, managed a five-per-cent penetration rate, meaning that five per cent of cable subscribers capable of receiving last season's four-game package purchased it.

While five per cent doesn't sound that impressive, Hebb says Canucks' games had higher ratings than any other sports product offered by Viewers' Choice.

"From a business perspective, we were successful," said Hebb. "We made money, but not much. Having said that, we don't do this to make money. We do it to expose our product."

...

"If those four games weren't on pay-per-view, they wouldn't be available anywhere else," said Hebb. "We want to get as much television exposure as possible so a person who's not living in the Vancouver area or a person who can't afford tickets can follow his or her team."

...

As for the future of Canucks' pay-per-view, it's entirely up in the air. The Canucks' three-year contract with BCTV expires at the end of this season and the team will be pushing for more of its games to be shown.
Canucks games were rare on television even in the team's local market back then. The number of games CBC and TSN aired each year nationally could be counted on one's hand.

If one wonders why Western Canadians dislike CBC and TSN, this is why. Anyone who claims to have watched Bure as a Canuck would have needed to live in British Columbia for most of those games; otherwise, how one could watch Bure and the Canucks from a place as far as New York State one can never know.

Most hockey fans began to watch him more closely in Florida and developed their judgment of his game based on his time in Florida. This perception of him has clearly tainted the way people understand his early years. Pavel was a different player prior to his injury. The more I analyze his early game, the more I realize he skated differently too. His strides were a lot more powerful prior to 1995; when he returned from his injury, it seems he needed to put more effort into his skating.

I think everyone here really needs to take this into consideration and realize Pavel did not receive exposure because he was buried in Vancouver. If you warm up to the idea of learning about pre-injury Pavel, we can begin to do a lot of work to understand who he was.

One has to marvel at how popular he became through word of mouth and sports highlights. Certainly, if he had played in a better market he would have received much more attention and would have been easier to market. On a team like the Rangers, he would have easily been viewed as the new face of the NHL. It's a testament to his ability as a player that he gained so much popularity around the league while being buried in Vancouver. Bettman wanted to make Pavel happen. If he were playing in a better market, Pavel would have happened.
Quote:
Works Cited

Bacchus, Lee. "Recipes Remain Same: Only Changes Cosmetic in Hockey Telecast 'Biz." The Province: 0. Sep 04 1993. ProQuest. Web. 5 Nov. 2013 .

Bacchus, Lee. "Upshot is Canucks Not on TV." The Province: 0. Mar 13 1992. ProQuest. Web. 5 Nov. 2013 .

"Canucks on TV." The Vancouver Sun: 0. Aug 17 1988. ProQuest. Web. 5 Nov. 2013 .

Jamieson, Jim. "Pay Per View on Horizon for Canucks." The Province: 0. Dec 11 1992. ProQuest. Web. 5 Nov. 2013 .

Kerr, Grant. "Canucks Strike Gold with Television Deal." The Globe and Mail: 0. Apr 09 1998. ProQuest. Web. 5 Nov. 2013 .

McKee, Ken. "Marketing Mystery: Argos Off TV 38 Days." Toronto Star: 0. Sep 12 1986. ProQuest. Web. 5 Nov. 2013 .

MacLEOD, ROBERT, Neil A. Campbell and TOM McKEE. "NHL Lockout would be 'Devastating' to Television, Radio." The Globe and Mail: 0. Sep 23 1994. ProQuest. Web. 5 Nov. 2013 .

"SPORTS MAILBAG." The Province: 0. Sep 19 1994. ProQuest. Web. 5 Nov. 2013 .


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12-06-2013, 05:49 AM
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Using this post to archive a number of neat, rare photographs of Pavel:





































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Bure might have been the face of the NHL for a couple years if the Canucks won it all in 1994. He was certainly a very exciting and dynamic player to watch. He had very marketable style and looks. If he had a Stanley Cup to go with it, that might have put him over the top, at least until the Avalance/Red Wings started winning their Cups with flashy elite players.

But without that Cup, he was one of many hockey demigods, as another post stated well.

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09-20-2014, 05:42 PM
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Here's an article from The Sporting News, published on April 17, 1995. The article discusses the two most marketable players in the league being Sergei Fedorov and Pavel Bure:
Quote:
The NHL's most exciting players are Russians Sergei Federov and Pavel Bure
Schoenfeld, Bruce. The Sporting News. 219.16 (Apr. 17, 1995): p50.

...

After years of head-in-the-sand leadership, the NHL has Gary Bettman, a professional marketer, pulling it into the next century against all odds... All it needs is a breakthrough star to carry it into the realm of the truly big leagues. And wouldn't you know it: Its two most exciting players are Russians. Now, as professional hockey stakes its claim as the equal of our continent's many other diversions, it is the Red Wings' Sergei Fedorov and the Canucks' Pavel Bure who will carry the message into the mainstream... Or is it possible that Fedorov and Bure might actually be just what hockey needs?... why not Russians?

Bure, who turned 24 the last day of March, shares nothing with Howe but his birthday. The NHL's most exciting player, his rink-long rushes are about the best thing hockey offers these days. He's also the more fascinating study. He's moodily intense, dark in a Dostoyevskian kind of way. It makes his spectacular play that much more dramatic.

...

Bure doesn't always like to talk and sometimes appears to have grown weary of publicity, but he will only get more of it. Last season, he became one of eight players in NHL history to score 60 goals in a season more than once, and he led the NHL with 16 goals in the playoffs. All the numbers and personality quirks mean nothing, however, once you've had the chance to see him play. Bure with the puck -- anywhere, anytime -- might be the sport's best advertisement.

...

A recent survey by the Sports Business Daily offered some answers. It ranked Bure and Fedorov first and fourth, respectively, among active players for marketing potential, with Lindros and Paul Kariya sandwiched between
... Beyond Vancouver's fans, of which there are many, Bure is especially popular at home with the teenage girls... Seven games against the Rangers last June helped market Bure to the unknowing, but not enough.

...

"I don't like the words `role model,'" says Larionov, who played with Bure with the Central Red Army and the Canucks. "But there are a lot of young boys out there who are trying to model themselves after Pavel Bure. He might want to pay more attention to that."... They approached with scrapbooks hundreds of pages long... At one point, he signed autographs for several hours.

Then he stepped on the ice and brought the magic back home. Bure is an easy player to like... If you had never seen a hockey game before and had scant idea of its rules, a Bure rush from his zone across three lines and into the slot could still leave you breathless.

"When he touches the puck," former teammate Greg Adams says, "there's just a feeling in the arena that something's going to happen. As soon as he starts up the ice, you can hear it in the building, the sighs and moans."

...
Quote:
Works Cited

Schoenfeld, Bruce. "Star Search. The NHL's Most Exciting Players Are Russians Sergei Fedorov And Pavel Bure." Sporting News 219.16 (1995): 50-52. SPORTDiscus. Web. 20 Sept. 2014.


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