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Strong on puck / dryland training

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Old
11-22-2013, 01:50 PM
  #1
Stickchecked
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Strong on puck / dryland training

As a middle age rec leaguer, I'm pretty fit and can skate pretty well. But I feel like my play with the puck is far worse than it should be given all the games and classes I've done.

I know I need to devote more time to just stickhandling in the basement. But aside from that, any suggestions on how to improve my play with the puck, especially receiving hard passes?

Caveats: While I have a basement area where I can stickhandle, I cannot set up a shooting area. Wish I could.

Also, despite the countless rinks in Ottawa, Stick and Puck does not exist here. So simple time on the ice won't happen. (until the outdoor rinks open)

Coachdoig posted this excellent video in the "Teaching The Modern Snap Shot" thread. This is the kind of stuff I'm talking about.

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11-22-2013, 03:32 PM
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Coachtdoig
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Are you getting bumped off of the puck by opponents or are you talking more in the sense of handlin passes, not getting your stick lifted etc?

Ciao,
TD

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11-22-2013, 03:38 PM
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JoeCool16
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I'm guessing he means taking passes that come really hard or fast, or maybe just on the backhand or from behind you while you're breaking out. Tough thing to work on without much room. You could make a shooting pad with some elastic workout bands (or buy one from a hockey shop) if you've got enough room to set up a board, and that might help you work on the feel of taking a pass. Not ideal or super realistic, but you can set it up and have it not take too much room...

Here's a video of what one looks like (I purposely chose the South African one with the little boy with facepaint and a indoor stick because it made me laugh!)

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11-26-2013, 03:47 AM
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hockeyisforeveryone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickchecked View Post
...I know I need to devote more time to just stickhandling in the basement...
This has got to be the most important training for being solid on the puck, controlled. I've seen some muscular bros who can't catch a pass to save their life. A player 3/4 or even 1/2 their weight may easily rob them of the puck. So to me it's not a matter of "brute" strength, it is developing the finer muscles that allow skill.

I don't believe stickhandling only works on quickness or finesse. Every movement is building power. As was said here recently about golf, it's not strength as much as generating power through technique+strength.

I stickhandle on my pad nearly every day, several times a day hopefully. In just a minute of practice your arms start to burn. I'll take a few breaths, stretch, and back at it for a few more minutes. As I get warmed up I find I can stay moving for longer sessions. I recommend using a heavy, light, and regulation puck to experience different feels. Also I have a miniature net I have to shoot at, just get very close so that I don't miss. In good moods or bad, stone sober or buzzed, there is my pad, like a best friend.

Sometimes only on the internet can we express such pride and confidence in our accomplishments. I am waaay better handling the puck, making moves, backhand passes, catching passes, shot, everything is stronger because of my practice. It's unbelievable how radically it has accelerated my game the last 2 years.

It's disappointing when folks talk about wanting to improve and I show them my practice area they are pumped up but never set it up for themselves. Either they are lazy or just don't believe. I'm telling ya jump around that basement stickhandling with a heavy puck you will receive the benefits immediately!

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11-27-2013, 05:20 AM
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American in Paris
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A big part of being strong on the puck in actual game play is being able to stickhandle while moving your feet.

Make sure to incorporate quick feet drills, transitions and spin moves in to your off-ice practice. If you do them regularly, at the highest intensity you can manage while keeping good form, the skill will slowly seep into your on-ice play.

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11-27-2013, 12:49 PM
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Stickchecked
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Quote:
Originally Posted by American in Paris View Post
A big part of being strong on the puck in actual game play is being able to stickhandle while moving your feet.

Make sure to incorporate quick feet drills, transitions and spin moves in to your off-ice practice. If you do them regularly, at the highest intensity you can manage while keeping good form, the skill will slowly seep into your on-ice play.
Yea, this is my problem. In classes, I'm very good with passing and receiving. But once I'm moving, it all goes to hell.

At someone's recommendation, I've started occasionally stick handling on a balance board. That gets tiring fast but seems to be good.

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11-27-2013, 01:12 PM
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Stickchecked
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It's funny, after watching one of the stickhandling videos, I realized that even if I don't have the option of setting up a shooting area, there's probably a lot to be gained from practicing shooting without a puck. Muscle memory, form, repetition. It may not enable one to practice accuracy but if your shot is undeveloped, the improved strength and form should still transfer to the ice.

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11-29-2013, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickchecked View Post
As a middle age rec leaguer, I'm pretty fit and can skate pretty well. But I feel like my play with the puck is far worse than it should be given all the games and classes I've done.

I know I need to devote more time to just stickhandling in the basement. But aside from that, any suggestions on how to improve my play with the puck, especially receiving hard passes?

Caveats: While I have a basement area where I can stickhandle, I cannot set up a shooting area. Wish I could.

Also, despite the countless rinks in Ottawa, Stick and Puck does not exist here. So simple time on the ice won't happen. (until the outdoor rinks open)

Coachdoig posted this excellent video in the "Teaching The Modern Snap Shot" thread. This is the kind of stuff I'm talking about.
Work Out.

There are two things that will make you a better hockey player in any area of the game. Practice the skill and work out.

Simple as that. Believe it or not. Working out using compound exercises like squats, deadlift, cleans, box jumps, pull ups. wall balls and more can significantly improve your bodies physical capabilities or in other words athleticism. Honest. I feel as though its obvious but I have heard people argue that doing squats does not make you a better hockey player. I for one know it does because I see the change in my play when I do and I dont do my work outs. Front squat for example is a great thing for hockey players. Real ones that have you really have your butt touch your ankles is great to improve your center of gravity, your balance, your strength, power and how to generate force. Controlling your body like that can make you faster, stronger skater especially with the puck.

You need to develop your core strength too. Biggest misconception is that our core is just our abs or abs and back... however it is mostly the muscles in between like the ones along our spine that help us keep balance even when lifting like say a luggage around an airport. And focusing on medium-high (mostly high) intensity exercises because they serve to be more efficient. With a proper warm up, stretch, HIIT work out and coll down you really dont have to be dedicated to it more than an hour. And according to the Tabata experiment, 4 minute high intensity interval training has served to be greater for your overall fitness and VO2 than doing a 60-minute medium interval training. Yes.

However I worry that because your middle aged, you probably brush off the "work outs" and say hockey is mostly my form of fitness. Well whether your a business man, father, just a regular guy trying to get through the day then I would still recommend HIIT training. Gary Roberts page really explains it well http://www.fitnessinstitute.com/gary...tive-programs/

I would recommend that you look into work out classes like Crossfit or MMA especially jui-Jitzu and who knows maybe both. Heck, you may even find a whole new hobby.

I would also highly recommend do your own research and practices. There is the world - wide web and Crossfit for example has done a GREAT job in providing an easy open source of fitness and nutritional information.

If you cant join one of these places for whatever reason, look into signing up for P90x or Insansity. Also very efficient. But I would call it second class to MMA training or Crossfit. I would look into your diet. A lot of bad habits when doing an athletic event like hockey can stem back to your diet. There are tons of studies and research done on the effects of eating Gluten or a grain-rich diet which is true for even non-allergic or celiec people. And much more.

You can very well buy your own weights or join a gym yourself. Howvever I would still recommend being open minded and looking into the journal entries and youtube videos of Crossfit to gain proper knowledge of what is fitness and health. I havnt joined a CF gym or a MMA gym yet but I do a lot of their training daily at my own gym and I see the benefits in all the sports i play especially hockey.

I am not suggesting that you have to all of a sudden train like Sidney Crosby or a professional athlete. You dont have to devote your life to diet and training. But the more you put in, the more you get out. Stay active.

if there is one last thing I can mention it is this.
Imagine when your walking. You are efficient in this to some degree. Now hold a heavy luggage on one side of your body and walk and you will see you have a tougher time. Like hockey, you can be a decent skater but it will be harder to do something when your asked to have 2 hands on a stick and focus on carrying a puck. You will need great core strength, better flexibility and hip mobility. And yes skill.

So indulge into some good functional work outs weekly or whenever you can. you will see a benefit

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Old
11-29-2013, 10:58 AM
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickchecked View Post
Yea, this is my problem. In classes, I'm very good with passing and receiving. But once I'm moving, it all goes to hell.

At someone's recommendation, I've started occasionally stick handling on a balance board. That gets tiring fast but seems to be good.
How about just go play hockey more. What do you mean that your "very good" passing and receiving but once your moving it goes to hell.

Not trying to insult you but if you mean that your only good at passing when standing still then there is only one thing you got to do to get better at it. Go find open ice and go play open hockey. Nothing is going to teach you as effectively as just doing it a X amount of times a day. Repetition. You know that. '

Going into your garage or basement and stick handling, or doing time on the balance board is all fine and dandy. But actually spend a lot of time just skating and shooting. If you cnat hop on the ice, its time to get the roller blades out.

All the "training" I have seen on here is asking of you to stay in a small area. Hockey is a game played on a large surface. So practice like that.

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Old
11-30-2013, 02:15 AM
  #10
Clarkington III
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I'll add leg strength. Helps you get lower and be able to load power DURING your stick handling maneuvers. It will help you skate through stick checks and absorb contact better if you can stay lower and keep the legs moving.

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11-30-2013, 06:59 AM
  #11
Marotte Marauder
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THE key exercise for athletes.

http://plyoathletics.blogspot.com/20...ou-punish.html


Also try some on ice stuff with a weighted puck, this will develop your hand strength and make it it MUCH easier when using a regulation puck.

Good luck and have fun.

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