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The Mike Keenan legend

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Old
12-05-2013, 03:16 AM
  #26
Hobnobs
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Keenan wasn't even close to a great coach. He didn't win the cup for the rangers, they won despite having him as a coach.

His stint with the Blues is enough to know how poor of a coach he were. Getting rid of Joseph. The Corson incident that made Gretzky leave. The Vancouver fiasco. Screwing Florida. Terrible person and a below average coach.

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Originally Posted by Walkingthroughforest View Post
Keenan never traded Huselius. He was a waiver pick up by Sutter. Story is already wrong.
He was traded for Dustin Johner and Steve Montador

http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2245153

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12-05-2013, 03:32 AM
  #27
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Keenan never traded Huselius. He was a waiver pick up by Sutter. Story is already wrong.
He was traded. Florida did waive Huselius before the trade though, but nobody picked him up.

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12-05-2013, 03:35 AM
  #28
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Originally Posted by Hobnobs View Post
Keenan wasn't even close to a great coach. He didn't win the cup for the rangers, they won despite having him as a coach.

His stint with the Blues is enough to know how poor of a coach he were. Getting rid of Joseph. The Corson incident that made Gretzky leave. The Vancouver fiasco. Screwing Florida. Terrible person and a below average coach.



He was traded for Dustin Johner and Steve Montador

http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2245153

Yup. Stacked Rangers team in a time when they were trying to spend their way to a cup.

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12-05-2013, 01:50 PM
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobnobs View Post
Keenan wasn't even close to a great coach. He didn't win the cup for the rangers, they won despite having him as a coach.

His stint with the Blues is enough to know how poor of a coach he were. Getting rid of Joseph. The Corson incident that made Gretzky leave. The Vancouver fiasco. Screwing Florida. Terrible person and a below average coach.
I wouldn't call him a pillar of the community by any means. Or an altogether nice man. But a good coach he was. Two Canada Cup wins, one Stanley Cup, 4 Cup final appearances in which the three he lost were to a team with either a prime Gretzky or Lemieux. Like players, the game passes you by and you can't be as good as you used to. But for a while, Keenan was a great coach, there is no denying this.

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12-05-2013, 02:04 PM
  #30
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I wouldn't call him a pillar of the community by any means. Or an altogether nice man. But a good coach he was. Two Canada Cup wins, one Stanley Cup, 4 Cup final appearances in which the three he lost were to a team with either a prime Gretzky or Lemieux. Like players, the game passes you by and you can't be as good as you used to. But for a while, Keenan was a great coach, there is no denying this.
I feel like after Keenan left NY, he almost became a caricature of himself, and started to fade away as an effective coach.

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12-06-2013, 04:53 PM
  #31
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There are lost of stories about Keenan's time with the Canucks, but how about this one:

Grant Ledyard left the team to be with his wife, who was awaiting some distressing medical news (cancer). Keenan cleaned out Ledyard's stall and told the rest of the players that Ledyard had quit on them.

What a guy.

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12-06-2013, 05:49 PM
  #32
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How fitting this thread pops up... Go to the KHL youtube channel, its worth your while. Yesterday - Starting goalie lets in 2 softies... Keenan has enough, yanks him, puts in former pen Pechursky. immediately after the faceoff they score on Pechursky... Keenan puts the other guy back in (now down 3-0)... Late in the 3rd keenan pulls his goalie with 4 minutes left... His team ties it, then goes into OT and wins it....

Now that is an example of how a coach can actually win a game for you in epic fashion with radical tactics... Love em or hate em, what a guy. The camera goes on his face many times during this and doesn't even crack the slightest emotion.

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12-06-2013, 07:03 PM
  #33
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I think there's two extremes to leadership - the psychopathic tyrant and the nice guy. One ruling by fear and intimidation, the other by friendship and understanding. Neither extreme tends to lasts for long because man needs both, pressure and encouragement, the carrot and the stick.

Mike Keenan clearly represented the tyrant side of things and I always had the sense that this act could produce great results in the short run but it was a scorched earth policy and it ran out of steam pretty quickly. People only take that crap for so long and at the end of the day a coach can't win for long with the team against him.

I think Bowman over time inspired a loyalty in people that Keenan never could and I think a part of that was that players could sense the greatness and ultimate absolute focus on winning in Bowman and they knew playing for him allowed them to be part of something special. I don't think Keenan ever gave people that sense because there was something off about his persona, something self-serving and phony that made it hard to view the abuse as part of a greater purpose.

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12-06-2013, 07:14 PM
  #34
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Originally Posted by TheMoreYouKnow View Post
I think there's two extremes to leadership - the psychopathic tyrant and the nice guy. One ruling by fear and intimidation, the other by friendship and understanding. Neither extreme tends to lasts for long because man needs both, pressure and encouragement, the carrot and the stick.

Mike Keenan clearly represented the tyrant side of things and I always had the sense that this act could produce great results in the short run but it was a scorched earth policy and it ran out of steam pretty quickly. People only take that crap for so long and at the end of the day a coach can't win for long with the team against him.

I think Bowman over time inspired a loyalty in people that Keenan never could and I think a part of that was that players could sense the greatness and ultimate absolute focus on winning in Bowman and they knew playing for him allowed them to be part of something special. I don't think Keenan ever gave people that sense because there was something off about his persona, something self-serving and phony that made it hard to view the abuse as part of a greater purpose.
Pretty much this, Keenan's style was probably better suited for junior or college where there is a higher turnover and coaches can outlast the players.

his results were very impressive and he is an interesting guy but probably not the greatest human being from the stories being told.

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12-06-2013, 07:27 PM
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMoreYouKnow View Post
I think there's two extremes to leadership - the psychopathic tyrant and the nice guy. One ruling by fear and intimidation, the other by friendship and understanding. Neither extreme tends to lasts for long because man needs both, pressure and encouragement, the carrot and the stick.

Mike Keenan clearly represented the tyrant side of things and I always had the sense that this act could produce great results in the short run but it was a scorched earth policy and it ran out of steam pretty quickly. People only take that crap for so long and at the end of the day a coach can't win for long with the team against him.

I think Bowman over time inspired a loyalty in people that Keenan never could and I think a part of that was that players could sense the greatness and ultimate absolute focus on winning in Bowman and they knew playing for him allowed them to be part of something special. I don't think Keenan ever gave people that sense because there was something off about his persona, something self-serving and phony that made it hard to view the abuse as part of a greater purpose.
Good post. From what I've read about Bowman (The Game and other sources) was that he was hard on his players, but never abusive. Shutt was quoted as saying that the common bond between the players was their hate for Bowman. However, I don't think that hate included a disrespect. If I had played for Keenan, I would have had a hard time respecting the man. Bowman was not their friend either, keeping a definitive distance from them. This was Dryden's experience on the Habs late 70's dynasty. He may have changed somewhat in his latter years. I haven't read much about how the Detroit or even Pittsburgh players experienced him.

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12-06-2013, 08:24 PM
  #36
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I have a brief story about Keenan. I used to read Sports Illustrated. They did a story about Keenan. Their reporter was crossing the border into Canada. The border guard asked the reporter the purpose of his visit to Canada. When he told the guard, the response was "He is a *******!".

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12-06-2013, 10:30 PM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMoreYouKnow View Post
I think there's two extremes to leadership - the psychopathic tyrant and the nice guy. One ruling by fear and intimidation, the other by friendship and understanding. Neither extreme tends to lasts for long because man needs both, pressure and encouragement, the carrot and the stick.

Mike Keenan clearly represented the tyrant side of things and I always had the sense that this act could produce great results in the short run but it was a scorched earth policy and it ran out of steam pretty quickly. People only take that crap for so long and at the end of the day a coach can't win for long with the team against him.

I think Bowman over time inspired a loyalty in people that Keenan never could and I think a part of that was that players could sense the greatness and ultimate absolute focus on winning in Bowman and they knew playing for him allowed them to be part of something special. I don't think Keenan ever gave people that sense because there was something off about his persona, something self-serving and phony that made it hard to view the abuse as part of a greater purpose.
I'm reminded of what was once said about the late Yankees catcher Thurman Munson, who was referred to as "moody". Sparky Lyle said, "When you're moody, you're nice sometimes. Thurman's just mean."

Bowman was passive-aggressive, sneaky, underhanded, and manipulative. He was able to have an unusually long career in his multiple stops because he had an uncanny notion of when to push harder and when to back off.

Keenan didn't care about any of that. He would simply plow over anyone, and if they couldn't handle whatever he was doing, the hell with 'em.

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12-06-2013, 10:59 PM
  #38
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Keenan didn't care about any of that. He would simply plow over anyone, and if they couldn't handle whatever he was doing, the hell with 'em.
Still his players could handle it enough to give him some great seasons in the first half of his career, added to two Canada Cup championships. Giving him a Calder Cup championship before that. Then his style became perhaps obsolete.

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12-06-2013, 11:27 PM
  #39
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Please allow me to bring in a wider scope of what was occurring in society during the time Keenan coached in the NHL. To be clear, he was successful up to the mid 90's, and its arguable that the 1994 Rangers would have won the Cup anyway without Keenan behind the bench. They had a prime Messier, Leetch and great goaltending. Around the mid to late 80's the secrets of sexual abuse began to surface as many more victims began to come forward. As society's eyes began to open to what had been occurring for years unbeknownst to many, a boat load of other issues regarding the treatment of human beings surfaced. These included domestic abuse, bullying, etc... and the power dynamics inherent to these tactics. A generation of teenagers, including hockey players and all participants in sports, in the late 80's were suddenly aware of the contrast between abuse and humane treatment of a person. Some of these teens eventually graduated to the NHL, played semi-pro or were involved in hockey at many other levels. Coaches like Keenan and others were suddenly questioned about their age old tactics and treatment of players. Many players were unwilling to put up with this treatment. Some took harsher stands to put a stop to it (i.e. Sheldon Kennedy). In other words, Keenan quickly became seen as a tyrant rather than a superior 'motivator'. I'll be very clear here, I am not saying Keenan was involved in the sexual abuse of any of his players. That is not the point of this discourse. I am briefly summarizing a revolution that occurred at a societal level that reached into the arenas of sport that allowed many to question what was right and what was wrong. I do believe that, as others have indicated in previous posts, that Keenan's effectiveness as a coach dwindled drastically after the early 90's and I believe there is a direct correlation to what I have just stated.

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12-06-2013, 11:45 PM
  #40
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^^^ True enough LBD however more so than even that, Keenan was forever getting into it with not only players but more critically with General Managers, Executives & even owners who employed him. Imagine resigning from a club after only being their for a year just weeks after youve won the Stanley Cup. He seemed power hungry, power mad in his dealings with everyone be it Bob Pulford in Chicago or Neil Smith in New York. Brett Hull or Trevor Linden. Just didnt matter. His way or no way. He's now Coaching in the KHL, and a good place for him to be doing so. No idea how he managed to pull it off. From Coaching Forest Hill Secondary in Toronto to the Oshawa Legionnaires at the Jr.B level; to Peterborough I believe, then with the University of Toronto Blues followed by the AHL & NHL, he did have a heck of a run. A real throwback. Somewhere south of the Hell of an Eddie Shore meets Punch Imlach. Real piece of work alrighty.

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12-06-2013, 11:55 PM
  #41
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Please allow me to bring in a wider scope of what was occurring in society during the time Keenan coached in the NHL. To be clear, he was successful up to the mid 90's, and its arguable that the 1994 Rangers would have won the Cup anyway without Keenan behind the bench. They had a prime Messier, Leetch and great goaltending. Around the mid to late 80's the secrets of sexual abuse began to surface as many more victims began to come forward. As society's eyes began to open to what had been occurring for years unbeknownst to many, a boat load of other issues regarding the treatment of human beings surfaced. These included domestic abuse, bullying, etc... and the power dynamics inherent to these tactics. A generation of teenagers, including hockey players and all participants in sports, in the late 80's were suddenly aware of the contrast between abuse and humane treatment of a person. Some of these teens eventually graduated to the NHL, played semi-pro or were involved in hockey at many other levels. Coaches like Keenan and others were suddenly questioned about their age old tactics and treatment of players. Many players were unwilling to put up with this treatment. Some took harsher stands to put a stop to it (i.e. Sheldon Kennedy). In other words, Keenan quickly became seen as a tyrant rather than a superior 'motivator'. I'll be very clear here, I am not saying Keenan was involved in the sexual abuse of any of his players. That is not the point of this discourse. I am briefly summarizing a revolution that occurred at a societal level that reached into the arenas of sport that allowed many to question what was right and what was wrong. I do believe that, as others have indicated in previous posts, that Keenan's effectiveness as a coach dwindled drastically after the early 90's and I believe there is a direct correlation to what I have just stated.
I vehemently disagree, mostly because you can change the years and names involved here and find that it's the same fundamental argument that's been made for decades in sports.

Frank Mahovlich told a story of his days with the Toronto Toros in the WHA. Jim Dorey was on the team and Bobby Baun was the coach. Baun was someone who coached with the volume permanently on 11; he would usually blow up between periods. At one point, Baun yelled something like, "You're all gutless; none of you would even fight me!" Dorey sighed, stood up, and asked, "Should I take my skates off, or can I keep them on?" This was around the same time that the St. Louis Cardinals had a clubhouse revolt against Vern Rapp.

MLB manager Leo Durocher was known for his "turn in your uniform!" tirades about once every year. He had a feud with Bobo Newsom, which culminated in Durocher telling the reporters a couple of unpleasant opinions about Newsom; the reporters obviously wrote about it. Arky Vaughan, who wouldn't say two words if one would do, took his uniform out of his locker, stormed into Durocher's office, and suggested a more specific anatomical placement for it. This was around the same time that the Cleveland Indians had a clubhouse revolt against Ossie Vitt.

Vince Lombardi is generally regarded as a tyrant; the quotes from former players about him and his tactics are legendary. And yet these same men, by and large, became successful after their playing careers as well (to a very unusual extent) and spoke glowingly of what Lombardi meant to their playing career and post-playing career, as well as family and personal life as well.

"The tactics" have never been tolerated in sports at a professional level. Keenan's idea of basically mashing on the gas and never letting off has never had any type of lasting success at the highest level because the players eventually revolt. If a couple of malcontents want out because they can't handle a new coach, that's one thing. But owners have usually been pretty finely tuned to what the respected veterans think, and when they start grousing, they're not the ones who get sent packing.

The ones who are generally regarded as tyrants really aren't. They generally have that sense of when they've pushed someone close to the point of breaking, and they know to pick him back up at that time. The ones who don't know how to do that just don't last. And that's not a new thing at all.

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12-07-2013, 12:22 AM
  #42
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I vehemently disagree...
All good points MB, but why would you "vehemently disagree" with LBD's thesis there? To some degree its absolutely correct. There were profound societal changes through the 60's & 70's and certainly within the game of hockey. From the first players revolt in the mid 50's to the Strike in Springfield & the creation of the NHLPA; the abolition of the Sponsorship System & creation of the Universal Draft. No longer were players going to meekly accept their lot in life, one of indentured servitude, restrictive practices, tyrannical Coaches, Managers, Owners. Some guys simply wouldnt put up with it as you note with Jim Dorey whereas others, malleable, Church Mice who wouldnt say **** if their mouths were full of it. But by & large, ya. You just could not pull the kind of crap that an Imlach or Adams got away with back in the day. Look what happened in Toronto in the late 70's when Ballard re-hired Imlach as GM & the meltdown that followed. Players, people had changed. No longer willing to sit still for guys like Imlach or Keenan for very long, some just shutting down, others going nuclear as Sittler did in cutting off the C on his jersey.

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12-07-2013, 12:33 AM
  #43
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All good points MB, but why would you "vehemently disagree" with LBD's thesis there? To some degree its absolutely correct. There were profound societal changes through the 60's & 70's and certainly within the game of hockey. From the first players revolt in the mid 50's to the Strike in Springfield & the creation of the NHLPA; the abolition of the Sponsorship System & creation of the Universal Draft. No longer were players going to meekly accept their lot in life, one of indentured servitude, restrictive practices, tyrannical Coaches, Managers, Owners. Some guys simply wouldnt put up with it as you note with Jim Dorey whereas others, malleable, Church Mice who wouldnt say **** if their mouths were full of it. But by & large, ya. You just could not pull the kind of crap that an Imlach or Adams got away with back in the day. Look what happened in Toronto in the late 70's when Ballard re-hired Imlach as GM & the meltdown that followed. Players, people had changed. No longer willing to sit still for guys like Imlach or Keenan for very long, some just shutting down, others going nuclear as Sittler did in cutting off the C on his jersey.
I'd argue that the NHL was slightly different only because of the suffocating restrictions placed on what a player could do via the C Form. Others players in other sports had something resembling options, while NHL players...not so much. Under Imlach, Mahovlich left the team twice due to bouts of severe depression, as did Shakey Walton. Eddie Shack left the team for a while after realizing he could make more money at home as a butcher than as a Maple Leaf.

I'd argue that the long-overdue expansion and the war with the WHA is what really changed things, not necessarily societal changes. Players were no longer left with the only options being "put up or shut up". This is the driving force of the massive leverage shift.

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12-07-2013, 12:46 AM
  #44
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I vehemently disagree, mostly because you can change the years and names involved here and find that it's the same fundamental argument that's been made for decades in sports.

Frank Mahovlich told a story of his days with the Toronto Toros in the WHA. Jim Dorey was on the team and Bobby Baun was the coach. Baun was someone who coached with the volume permanently on 11; he would usually blow up between periods. At one point, Baun yelled something like, "You're all gutless; none of you would even fight me!" Dorey sighed, stood up, and asked, "Should I take my skates off, or can I keep them on?" This was around the same time that the St. Louis Cardinals had a clubhouse revolt against Vern Rapp.

MLB manager Leo Durocher was known for his "turn in your uniform!" tirades about once every year. He had a feud with Bobo Newsom, which culminated in Durocher telling the reporters a couple of unpleasant opinions about Newsom; the reporters obviously wrote about it. Arky Vaughan, who wouldn't say two words if one would do, took his uniform out of his locker, stormed into Durocher's office, and suggested a more specific anatomical placement for it. This was around the same time that the Cleveland Indians had a clubhouse revolt against Ossie Vitt.

Vince Lombardi is generally regarded as a tyrant; the quotes from former players about him and his tactics are legendary. And yet these same men, by and large, became successful after their playing careers as well (to a very unusual extent) and spoke glowingly of what Lombardi meant to their playing career and post-playing career, as well as family and personal life as well.

"The tactics" have never been tolerated in sports at a professional level. Keenan's idea of basically mashing on the gas and never letting off has never had any type of lasting success at the highest level because the players eventually revolt. If a couple of malcontents want out because they can't handle a new coach, that's one thing. But owners have usually been pretty finely tuned to what the respected veterans think, and when they start grousing, they're not the ones who get sent packing.

The ones who are generally regarded as tyrants really aren't. They generally have that sense of when they've pushed someone close to the point of breaking, and they know to pick him back up at that time. The ones who don't know how to do that just don't last. And that's not a new thing at all.
I will disagree. Disciplinarian, authoritarian, maybe, tyrant no. Lombardi worked his players half to death, but he cared about them. He wanted them to be the best players that they could be on the field. He wanted them to be the best citizens, fathers, husbands, brothers and sons off the field. He didn't like Hornung's running around late at night. He also talked to Pete Rozelle to get Hornung back after his 1963 suspension for gambling. Hate the sin, love the sinner; that was Lombardi!

Leo "the Lip" had a big reputation for being verbally aggressive. I only saw him towards the end of his career. I heard he was a lot worse in the 1950s, but that was before me.


Last edited by adsfan: 12-07-2013 at 12:56 AM.
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12-07-2013, 01:06 AM
  #45
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I'd argue that the NHL was slightly different only because of the suffocating restrictions placed on what a player could do via the C Form. Others players in other sports had something resembling options, while NHL players...not so much. Under Imlach, Mahovlich left the team twice due to bouts of severe depression, as did Shakey Walton. Eddie Shack left the team for a while after realizing he could make more money at home as a butcher than as a Maple Leaf.

I'd argue that the long-overdue expansion and the war with the WHA is what really changed things, not necessarily societal changes. Players were no longer left with the only options being "put up or shut up". This is the driving force of the massive leverage shift.
Then look at things globally. In 1989 the Wall came down. 1991 USSR revolution and recently the people of Egypt no longer wanting to accept the rules of a dictatorship. Civil war in Syria, etc...People in all walks of life are saying enough with tyrants. It all trickles down. As a former therapist, when the parents of a kid who was acting out brought the kid in for me to "fix" him/her, I kindly told the child he could wait in the waiting room while I surveyed the parents about what was happening at home, school, sports, etc...Crap doesn't flow uphill.

In the arena of sports, look at what Branch Rickey did for African- Americans, Latinos; giving them a chance and a voice. And lets not forget about Curt Flood's work in challenging free agency. Ted Lindsay's devotion to creating a union and pension for former players. Many societies and the sport arenas in those societies have progressed beyond the basic security of employment. They are seeking respect, self-esteem, the freedom to create, non-prejudice, morality and honesty. Take a look at Maslow's hierarchy of needs. In the O6 era, most players barely got to the 2nd level, which is security of employment. Most of them knew that at any time, they could be shipped to the minors or blacklisted for speaking out or disobeying orders.

Today's players are operating in a much more progressive society with many more options thanks to the work of many. This includes the WHA which challenged the archaic ways of the old NHL.

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12-07-2013, 02:18 AM
  #46
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Lombardi rode players hard, yelled at them for mistakes, but he never demeaned them as players or as human beings. I think Keenan crossed that line frequently.


Last edited by Killion: 12-07-2013 at 02:38 AM. Reason: typo...
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12-07-2013, 03:35 AM
  #47
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Please allow me to bring in a wider scope of what was occurring in society during the time Keenan coached in the NHL. To be clear, he was successful up to the mid 90's, and its arguable that the 1994 Rangers would have won the Cup anyway without Keenan behind the bench. They had a prime Messier, Leetch and great goaltending. Around the mid to late 80's the secrets of sexual abuse began to surface as many more victims began to come forward. As society's eyes began to open to what had been occurring for years unbeknownst to many, a boat load of other issues regarding the treatment of human beings surfaced. These included domestic abuse, bullying, etc... and the power dynamics inherent to these tactics. A generation of teenagers, including hockey players and all participants in sports, in the late 80's were suddenly aware of the contrast between abuse and humane treatment of a person. Some of these teens eventually graduated to the NHL, played semi-pro or were involved in hockey at many other levels. Coaches like Keenan and others were suddenly questioned about their age old tactics and treatment of players. Many players were unwilling to put up with this treatment. Some took harsher stands to put a stop to it (i.e. Sheldon Kennedy). In other words, Keenan quickly became seen as a tyrant rather than a superior 'motivator'. I'll be very clear here, I am not saying Keenan was involved in the sexual abuse of any of his players. That is not the point of this discourse. I am briefly summarizing a revolution that occurred at a societal level that reached into the arenas of sport that allowed many to question what was right and what was wrong. I do believe that, as others have indicated in previous posts, that Keenan's effectiveness as a coach dwindled drastically after the early 90's and I believe there is a direct correlation to what I have just stated.
It was Keenan who brought Stephane Matteau, Steve Larmer, Brian Noonan, and Greg Gilbert to the Rangers, no Keenan no cup.

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12-07-2013, 04:51 AM
  #48
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Originally Posted by LeBlondeDemon10 View Post
Good post. From what I've read about Bowman (The Game and other sources) was that he was hard on his players, but never abusive. Shutt was quoted as saying that the common bond between the players was their hate for Bowman. However, I don't think that hate included a disrespect. If I had played for Keenan, I would have had a hard time respecting the man. Bowman was not their friend either, keeping a definitive distance from them. This was Dryden's experience on the Habs late 70's dynasty. He may have changed somewhat in his latter years. I haven't read much about how the Detroit or even Pittsburgh players experienced him.
I know Bob Errey and Aaron Ward hated Bowman in Detroit. Ward, once, on TSN said something to the effect of, "Ask Slava Kozlov what he thinks of Bowman," although I've never seen any stories about Kozlov/Bowman.

Found this in a 1997 article: http://www.nytimes.com/1997/06/09/sp...ding-ring.html

Quote:
Ciccarelli called Bowman ''a great coach and a rotten person.'' Errey said Bowman used Slava Kozlov as a ''Russian whipping boy'' because he knew he could intimidate Kozlov, who wouldn't fight back.

Burr said Bowman kicks over the luggage of strangers at airports. Bowman once asked Burr what Burr thought of him and Burr replied: ''You're 60 years old, you use a horn to make line changes, you play with toy trains. I think you are ********.''
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Quote:
When he coached Pittsburgh in the early 1990's, the players agreed to play for Bowman only if he stayed in the locker room during practice. He has more power over the players in Detroit, but the team's bitter office politics are an open secret.

Jim Devellano, the senior vice president of the team and Bowman's superior on the organizational depth chart, said during the season that he doesn't like Bowman and Bowman doesn't like him but that they are able to work together.
From what I remember, Bowman's reputation in Detroit mostly had to do with how hard he worked them and how demanding he was. I seem to recall Dave Lewis being the "good cop," and he had most of the interaction with the players. Or so it was reported at the time.

These days Bowman sometimes watches Tampa Bay Lightning games with Steve Yzerman, and Yzerman still has nothing but praise for him. I guess 3 Stanley Cups will buy you that. ...And that's also probably the difference between Bowman and Keenan.

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12-07-2013, 09:40 AM
  #49
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Bowman once asked Burr what Burr thought of him and Burr replied: ''You're 60 years old, you use a horn to make line changes, you play with toy trains. I think you are ********.''
That's a nice burn.

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12-07-2013, 09:46 AM
  #50
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Originally Posted by Mike Martin View Post
It was Keenan who brought Stephane Matteau, Steve Larmer, Brian Noonan, and Greg Gilbert to the Rangers, no Keenan no cup.
Those were his consolation prizes. He wanted Chelios and Belfour and wanted Leetch and Richter shipped out to get them and had huge fights with Neil Smith about that.

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