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Noob forward tips

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Old
05-26-2014, 04:11 PM
  #1
TheRedShadow
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Noob forward tips

Has anyone got any basic tips for a noob forward (LW, shoot left, playing in beginner adult rec).

I'm talking about being able to stickhandle in the O zone and get round people; basic stuff like cupping the puck away from the D man.

Are there any tips like what to watch for in a defenseman re how he holds his stick, getting on his backhand side etc?

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05-26-2014, 04:37 PM
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Lieo
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At 5:15. Practice this everyday at home and you'll be a champ.

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05-26-2014, 04:38 PM
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iFishyHD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntsSheffield View Post
Has anyone got any basic tips for a noob forward (LW, shoot left, playing in beginner adult rec).

I'm talking about being able to stickhandle in the O zone and get round people; basic stuff like cupping the puck away from the D man.

Are there any tips like what to watch for in a defenseman re how he holds his stick, getting on his backhand side etc?
Not as easy it sounds. Just practice stickhandling by yourself and translate some stuff in game.

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05-26-2014, 06:40 PM
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rh71
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getting around people:
- always keep your legs moving, change speeds and directions if you have to.
- use your inside leg to angle off a poke check and keep pushing with the other leg.
- lean on the defender and practice a lot of 1-handed puck-cupping while turning corners

Think about it from a defenseman's perspective. What do you hate about agile forwards the most? Big forwards the most?


Last edited by rh71: 05-26-2014 at 07:36 PM.
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05-26-2014, 08:20 PM
  #5
Eazy for Kuzy
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Besides stickhandling, I think that moving your feet quickly and changing directions suddenly is the most effective way to get some space in the O zone.
Practice stickhandling at full speed and skating whenever you get ice time. If you can, you should also practice stickhandling at home.
Once you master both stickhandling and skating, you'll be "shifty". Kane and Subban are good examples.

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05-27-2014, 07:31 AM
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TheRedShadow
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I'm also mining this thread for ideas/inspiration http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh....php?t=1101843

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05-27-2014, 09:59 AM
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Always try to Find open ice. After being away from the game for 20 years my skills are half of what the used to be. I try to find open ice in the offensive zone. you will be surprised at how many pucks find you.

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05-27-2014, 10:21 AM
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Move laterally. In beginner leagues, defensemen have a real hard time moving laterally and maintaining gap control. In warmups, practice crossing the blue line with speed and then cutting to the center of the ice around the top of the circles. It's important to skate through that turn with at least one or two crossovers to get to the center of the ice so the d-man has to keep up. Then rip a shot from there. If the d-men start stepping up on that, you can alternatively drive around them on your backhand.

This forces the d-man to move laterally which many beginner league d-men struggle with. Since you're a lefty, you'll find this easier to enter the zone on the right side and then cut middle to shoot on your forehand.

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05-27-2014, 10:24 AM
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Don't chase your teammates. Get open and give them an option. If someone crowds you, find open ice and hope they're wise enough to get you the puck.

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05-27-2014, 10:26 AM
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It really depends on what type of player you're trying to be. What's your body type? What are your strengths as a player? You need to try and come up with a style of play that works with what you do well. Even though you're new, there has to be a part of your game that's measurably stronger than the other.

I'll use myself as an example.
I'm a husky, stocky (some would say fat) guy. 5'9', 250lbs. However, I'm very strong and quick on my skates for a guy my size, and I have a strong wrist shot. I'm not a great stick handler, and my vision/hockey sense isn't all that great.

The closest comparison I have for my style of play is Rick Nash. I try to isolate dmen and beat them 1v1, mostly by using a quick burst to gain body position, then either crash the net and try to create a rebound for my linemates to clean up, or unleash my wrist shot if I have enough space. Once dmen begin to expect that move, it opens them up for the crossover or a toe drag, and I can usually walk right into the slot on them at least once or twice a game.

I guess what I'm saying is, you have to try an be honest with yourself about what your strengths and weaknesses are. If you're honestly not sure, ask your teammates for help in evaluating yourself. Ask for brutal, but constructive, honesty.

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05-27-2014, 10:38 AM
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elmariachi227
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As a noob in a noob league I think you can take your time with that stuff. Personally, as a noob I found it more important to work on getting the puck out of D zone and getting it into the offensive zone.

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05-27-2014, 01:53 PM
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IK you specifically asked about puck handling but if you are the newest and weakest player on your line then the best general hockey advice I can give you is go to the net. I would much rather have someone screening the goalie or at least occupying a D man then skating aimlessly around. This will also give you some good chances to get a goal off a rebound.

If you dont want to do that always try and find the open ice or somewhere where you can "create" open ice. Your positioning may draw a defender closer to you, creating a better chance for the person with the puck.

Also make sure to know where you are on the ice and where the other players are (your team and theirs). Keep you head on a swivel. I cant tell you how many times I have seen someone miss a chance or give up a big play because they were focused soley on the puck. Look around constantly. Hockey is a very fluid game, you always have to be reevaluating your positioning.

For your question about watching the defender and where to. Like the previous poster said try to cut to the middle. Lower level players have a hard time moving laterally when going backwards fast.

A good tip for when you are on D or challenging their D in their zone: try to force them to their backhand. Lower level league players are not going to be accurate with a backhand pass

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05-27-2014, 02:02 PM
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wils5150
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I will also add that when in your d zone if you are a winger know where your guy on the point is. nothing worse than open men on the point.

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05-27-2014, 07:19 PM
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Terry Yake
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just create space and get open when you're in the opponent's zone and don't be shy to go to the net

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05-28-2014, 03:04 AM
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TheRedShadow
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revelation View Post
It really depends on what type of player you're trying to be. What's your body type? What are your strengths as a player? You need to try and come up with a style of play that works with what you do well. Even though you're new, there has to be a part of your game that's measurably stronger than the other.
I'm 6'2" and 210lbs. I'm not massively agile skating-wise but am v solid on my feet with good balance. And I can put the jets on for quick bursts. I can get the puck to the zone but have been short of ideas of what to do next if I keep the puck, so I'm starting to think about what to do.

For now I think using my acceleration is the way to go, then building in weaving and crossovers with the puck.

I also tend to be an organiser/shouter among our noob F group and the one that thinks about zone entry and all that shizzle more than anyone else, so I have no probs reading the F game in the zone.

I also tend to be quite defence minded as I always played those positions in soccer so I tend to go in for the stick/puck pretty hard. So, I might switch to (defensively-responsible) centre at some point.

Since posting the thread I've been using a coach clipboard and coming up with lots of ideas for O zone movement, even if it's just to start thinking about it.

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05-29-2014, 12:45 PM
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TheGrapesOfMcIlrath
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntsSheffield View Post
I'm 6'2" and 210lbs. I'm not massively agile skating-wise but am v solid on my feet with good balance. And I can put the jets on for quick bursts. I can get the puck to the zone but have been short of ideas of what to do next if I keep the puck, so I'm starting to think about what to do.

For now I think using my acceleration is the way to go, then building in weaving and crossovers with the puck.

I also tend to be an organiser/shouter among our noob F group and the one that thinks about zone entry and all that shizzle more than anyone else, so I have no probs reading the F game in the zone.

I also tend to be quite defence minded as I always played those positions in soccer so I tend to go in for the stick/puck pretty hard. So, I might switch to (defensively-responsible) centre at some point.

Since posting the thread I've been using a coach clipboard and coming up with lots of ideas for O zone movement, even if it's just to start thinking about it.
Honestly, with that frame, decent burst speed and balance, you should be able to make an outside move, lean in, and drive the net hard. That should be your bread and butter while you improve other areas of your game. Just impose your will on smaller, slower dmen.

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06-03-2014, 08:49 AM
  #17
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Last edited by nystromshairstylist: 06-03-2014 at 08:59 AM.
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06-04-2014, 01:34 AM
  #18
Fanned On It
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I've seen the word "cross-over" used in this thread a few times... what exactly is a cross-over in hockey?

Genuine question.

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06-04-2014, 06:54 AM
  #19
TheGrapesOfMcIlrath
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fanned On It View Post
I've seen the word "cross-over" used in this thread a few times... what exactly is a cross-over in hockey?

Genuine question.
Well, I use the term for when I setup a dman leaning outside, then cut back towards the center of the ice to open up a shooting lane in the high slot. May not be the correct term, but that's just how I personally use it.

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06-04-2014, 03:05 PM
  #20
jorbjorb
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either have the speed to beat him to the outside
or have the hands to make a move

if you don't have either practice on your own time and don't screw your team over by trying to be ovie out there

chip it in the corner or make a pass if you aren't fast / dont have the puck handling skills

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