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Players that didn't enjoy the Game

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Old
07-27-2014, 10:20 AM
  #26
Analyzer
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I was watching Chris Nilan's movie/with other enforcers and he told a story about how he was benched in Boston and they had 2 other guys who they were looking at to be the heavyweights/tough guys.

On the road 1 of them breaks his ankle and when they get back the other doesn't want to be a tough guy anymore and retires.

I can't remember the name.

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07-27-2014, 10:31 AM
  #27
Kirikanoir
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Originally Posted by The Panther View Post
I don't know how much Trevor Linden enjoyed the game, but every time I saw one of his interviews he looked like he was passing a kidney stone.
Linden heroic in 1994 Stanley Cup Final
http://canucks.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=453227

"You don't know this, but Trevor Linden had cracked ribs and torn rib cartilage for the last four games of the 1994 Stanley Cup Final," Cliff Ronning said. "You can't imagine what it's like to hear your captain, in a room down the hall, screaming at the top of his lungs as they injected the needle into his rib cage. Knowing him, he probably thought we couldn't hear. He would then walk into our dressing room like nothing had happened. That was inspirational."

I doubt one would go through things like this if they don`t enjoy what they are doing and it`s just a job to them.

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07-27-2014, 01:44 PM
  #28
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Ken Dryden was mentioned. Reading his book, you got the sense that his entire team kind of got bored because they never faced any real competition. But for me, Dryden is the ultimate example of a guy saying "meh, I've got better things to do".

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07-27-2014, 02:37 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by The Panther View Post
I don't know how much Trevor Linden enjoyed the game, but every time I saw one of his interviews he looked like he was passing a kidney stone.

Same with Markus Naslund.

Were they schooled by Canucks' management to look as bored and uninspired as possible when being interviewed?
Ogopogo?

Naslund, yeah. His last 3 years as a Canuck it looked like he'd rather be anywhere but playing hockey.

Linden, not a chance. Guy bled hockey from start to finish. Toews never smiles either, does he hate hockey?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Analyzer View Post
I was watching Chris Nilan's movie/with other enforcers and he told a story about how he was benched in Boston and they had 2 other guys who they were looking at to be the heavyweights/tough guys.

On the road 1 of them breaks his ankle and when they get back the other doesn't want to be a tough guy anymore and retires.

I can't remember the name.
Allan Stewart I think. Retired early in 1991-92 saying he didn't want to be a tough guy anymore.

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07-27-2014, 09:34 PM
  #30
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Gilbert Brule quit hockey to apparently become a firefighter.

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07-28-2014, 04:17 PM
  #31
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Fred Arthur wanted to become a pro golfer.

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07-28-2014, 04:24 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrozenJagrt View Post
Ken Dryden was mentioned. Reading his book, you got the sense that his entire team kind of got bored because they never faced any real competition. But for me, Dryden is the ultimate example of a guy saying "meh, I've got better things to do".
Perhaps the best example of this would be teammate Bill Nyrop. NCAA All-American, captain of the '76 U.S. Canada Cup team, winner of 3 Stanley Cups, a very steady #4 behind the Big Three, Nyrop walked away from the Canadiens during the '79 training camp to, like Dryden, pursue a law degree. He returned briefly for his hometown North Stars, telling GM Lou Nanne that he would only play the one season, was his same steady self, then went overseas to play in Europe for a year. Finished law school, became a practicing attorney, coached minor-league in Florida, and then while suffering from cancer went on a 1000 mile bicycle ride from the Pacific to Yellowstone, before sadly succumbing to the cancer at age 43. He was elected to the U.S. HHoF a year later. Obviously he enjoyed the game enough to keep returning to it, he just found other things that held his interest enough to repeatedly leave it. Interesting man.

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07-28-2014, 07:33 PM
  #33
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Originally Posted by double5son10 View Post
Perhaps the best example of this would be teammate Bill Nyrop. NCAA All-American, captain of the '76 U.S. Canada Cup team, winner of 3 Stanley Cups, a very steady #4 behind the Big Three, Nyrop walked away from the Canadiens during the '79 training camp to, like Dryden, pursue a law degree. He returned briefly for his hometown North Stars, telling GM Lou Nanne that he would only play the one season, was his same steady self, then went overseas to play in Europe for a year. Finished law school, became a practicing attorney, coached minor-league in Florida, and then while suffering from cancer went on a 1000 mile bicycle ride from the Pacific to Yellowstone, before sadly succumbing to the cancer at age 43. He was elected to the U.S. HHoF a year later. Obviously he enjoyed the game enough to keep returning to it, he just found other things that held his interest enough to repeatedly leave it. Interesting man.
I refereed some of his games when he played High School for Edina. His father was the CEO of Northwest Airlines. In 1969, Bill was the quarterback of his High School team that was undefeated and that same year he played for the hockey team that won the State hockey championship. He went to college and played hockey for the University of Notre Dame. He tried out for the football team and won the job as the back-up quarterback but he suffered an injury and so he just stuck to playing hockey.

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07-28-2014, 08:34 PM
  #34
Dennis Bonvie
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Fred Arthur wanted to become a pro golfer.
Fred Arthur wanted to be a doctor.

He quit hockey and became one.

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07-28-2014, 08:44 PM
  #35
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Originally Posted by diligent_d View Post
Gilbert Brule quit hockey to apparently become a firefighter.
He did, but then he un-retired to join a KHL team. The guy has played everywhere... I don't think that players would travel to the lengths he has if they don't seriously love the game.

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07-28-2014, 11:33 PM
  #36
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He did, but then he un-retired to join a KHL team. The guy has played everywhere... I don't think that players would travel to the lengths he has if they don't seriously love the game.
I bet many hockey players can't make the transition to the daily grind. Must be hard when you're used to "work" only a couple of hours a day for a massive paycheck to do the 9-to-5 thing.

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07-29-2014, 03:06 PM
  #37
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You didn't like Shawshank? IDK about best of all time, but it was damn good.
Its good, but a feelgood movie cant be one the very best movies of all time like it is ranked on IMDB. It does the trick to not step on anybodys toes so they can all go to bed to a Hallelujah. Only to wake up finding the magic gone and it was just another pretty good movie.

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07-29-2014, 07:51 PM
  #38
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Tom Edur: good young defenceman in the 70s who became disillusioned with the lifestyle of professional athletes. Retired at age 23 to devote his life to the Jehovahs Witness religion. Despite having a decent showing in his final year, he later said that he couldn't wait for the season to end so he could forget about hockey and move on.

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07-30-2014, 12:43 AM
  #39
Ogie Goldthorpe
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Originally Posted by crobro View Post
Fred Arthur wanted to become a pro golfer.
You're thinking of Todd Bergen.



And Iggy Pop.

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07-30-2014, 10:04 AM
  #40
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And Iggy Pop.
Wasn't it Alice Cooper? Or Iggy and Alice?

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08-02-2014, 08:33 PM
  #41
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Alexandre Daigle immediately comes to mind.

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08-02-2014, 11:53 PM
  #42
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Ryan Howse.

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08-03-2014, 12:28 AM
  #43
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Dave 'The Hammer' Schultz

It seems as though many tough guys could be mentioned here.

Darryl Stanley was one that really seemed to not enjoy it.

I know Mogilny was said to hate flying, but for whatever reason, he just never seemed to enjoy playing the game.

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08-03-2014, 12:51 AM
  #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oscar Acosta View Post
Eric Lindros in the late 80s declining to go to the Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds

"So I'm good at hockey, I don't want to leave home, I don't want to leave my parents, brother and sister. I want to go to high school with my friends. What if I want to be an accountant?"

- Eric Lindros "The Hockey News" 1988

Not that he didn't like hockey, or playing it because he could have quit - but he raised a valid point about people controlling his destiny before he figured it out himself.
This is always my response to this with Lindros. No one is controlling you at all. There is nothing stopping you from quitting hockey, buying a pair of work boots and punching in at a factory from 9-to-5. No one has a gun to your head. Too bad Bonnie and Carl didn't drill that into his head. Where as Gretzky left home at 14 or so and that led him to become the greatest player there ever was. Would a teenage boy miss his parents? Sure he would, who wouldn't? But maybe the allure of working in an office for an entry level salary isn't exciting either. So suck it up and go where you are drafted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrozenJagrt View Post
Ken Dryden was mentioned. Reading his book, you got the sense that his entire team kind of got bored because they never faced any real competition. But for me, Dryden is the ultimate example of a guy saying "meh, I've got better things to do".
I never understood this with Dryden either. He mentioned after the 1977 season that hockey was too easy for him. The Habs had no competition that year. But by 1979 it was a different story. This was the closest affair they had. Boston almost beat them. Dryden had a lousy game in Game 7. He then was about to be benched in Game 2 against the Rangers before Bunny Larocque got hurt in warm up. I don't think "boring" is the way to describe 1979. My question is, did Dryden know Bowman was leaving at that time and that Lemaire was too? Did he see the writing on the wall?

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Originally Posted by MS View Post
Linden, not a chance. Guy bled hockey from start to finish. Toews never smiles either, does he hate hockey?
Definitely not Linden. Put too much heart into things. Toews talked just recently about losing to the Kings and how it still hurts. I've heard him say on more than one occasion that once you win the Cup you think it's yours and you want it back. This isn't a guy who hates hockey.

Although I thought he was a loser (pretty much all non-Rangers fans did) it never seemed like Sean Avery liked hockey.

Carl Brewer quit hockey for several years and claims it was because of Punch Imlach. He had a fear of flying as well.

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08-03-2014, 02:46 AM
  #45
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Daigle, of course.

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08-03-2014, 03:30 AM
  #46
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Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
This is always my response to this with Lindros. No one is controlling you at all. There is nothing stopping you from quitting hockey, buying a pair of work boots and punching in at a factory from 9-to-5. No one has a gun to your head. Too bad Bonnie and Carl didn't drill that into his head. Where as Gretzky left home at 14 or so and that led him to become the greatest player there ever was. Would a teenage boy miss his parents? Sure he would, who wouldn't? But maybe the allure of working in an office for an entry level salary isn't exciting either. So suck it up and go where you are drafted. .
See what happens if you have a kid. Or if you have a tight family bond, if your son doesn't want to move away from home because he is insanely awesome in his hockey league, you're honestly the guy that's going to tell your son "Quit hockey all together. You like playing the game, but the world wants you to move 500 miles away so suck it up". ??

Or are you going to actually be a loving parent thats like "Ok, let's find a route thats best for you - MY SON"??

If he doesn't want to move away - he shouldn't ****ing have to. He's a kid, not a property. Every kid should grow up with their parents and live a normal life. He wasn't Sidney Crosby where his parents sent him to academies to make him great, he was just born great. He didn't ask for it.

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08-03-2014, 03:33 AM
  #47
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I have a son, he's two years old. If he's a baseball or hockey prodigy and says to me "Dad, I don't want to move" - it's never going to happen. Period.

My kid isn't going to be owned by anyone by any draft. Nobody will dictate his life but him. Just like you had, or I had.

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08-03-2014, 03:52 AM
  #48
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Dan Quinn comes to mind. Quinn embarked on a career in golf after his NHL career ended.

Chuck Lefley, and Gilles "Gratoony The Loony" Gratton were mentioned earlier, both played for the Blues in the mid 70s. Lefley suddenly "retired" in 1977. This was the start of a very dark period for the Blues, with Ownership issues, and the death of Defender Bob Gassoff ( My Avatar photo by the way) And 1st round pick Scott Campbell signing with the WHA's Houston Aeros instead.

On Oct. 9, 1977, three days before the start of the 1977-78 season, Lefley announced he had decided to retire from hockey at age of 27 and commit himself to farming in Manitoba. He said he was retiring for "personal reasons" because he was no longer happy being a pro player. He left the St. Louis, where he had been a 40-goal scorer two seasons earlier, and initially went home to Canada. By November, however, he had gone to Helsinki, Finland, and signed a three-year contract with Jokerit. He would spend the next two years in Europe, revitalizing his career. Although he came back to the Blues, the team not happy with his decision to unretire and play in Europe. The Blues still owned his NHL rights, and Emile Francis, St. Louis' president and general manager, did not think Lefley should be allowed to play in Europe without compensation from his European team. At the time, the NHL was required it to pay the International Ice Hockey Federation $50,000 for every European player it signed, but there was nothing to stop the IIHF clubs from signing North Americans. Nothing came of Francis' complaints, but the Blues were able to reclaim Lefley when he decided to return to the NHL on June 29, 1979, saying he felt like he had rediscovered his love for the game and wanted to play for the Blues again.

Gratton was a piece of work alright. Legend has it that Gratton once told his teammates he was reincarnated and had once been a soldier in the Spanish Inquisition.He may also have believed that he was an executioner who had stoned people to death and was fated to be a goalie as punishment.


Last edited by JustOneB4IDie: 08-03-2014 at 04:04 AM.
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Old
08-03-2014, 04:46 AM
  #49
Theokritos
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So suck it up and go where you are drafted.
Or you just go and play where you choose instead of letting others choose. Lindros did. Good for him.

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Old
08-03-2014, 08:25 AM
  #50
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The last couple of posts remind me of the famous video of Walter Gretzky circa 1970 being interviewed by a CBC reporter on how some Ontario minor hockey league was "telling" him where Wayne was going to play. Walter stood up and said, "Nobody is going to tell me where my son should play. This is our choice (paraphrase)." I would call this an effective parental intervention. While Lindros' parents did the same thing at the amateur level with Eric, they became more of an interference when it came to Eric being drafted. There is a time and place for parents to intervene, but once your child hits 18, its their choice as to what they want to do. Someone mentioned the the Lindros family was "tight-knit." I'd call it enmeshed. Eric was more brainwashed than he was informed of the rights and choices he can make once he becomes an adult. Walter didn't step in and tell Wayne not to sign with the Indianapolis Racers, a floundering team in the NHL's rival league. He obviously felt he trusted his son at 17 to make the right choice for himself. Isn't it rather strange that Eric eventually married a French-Canadian girl? Isn't that a big f-you to his parents for meddling in his life for so long? Theoretical on my part, but I don't believe in accidents.

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