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I need advice on defense

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Old
11-11-2005, 08:50 PM
  #26
Hockeylover
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Another game on defense in ball hockey tonight. For a change: An easy win, 3-1. Easy until the last two minutes... They scored their only goal with two minutes left, and they almost scored on a break-away with 30 seconds left when our defenseman got a little too agressive when he went all offense and lost the ball to the opponent who got a break-away. The man lost the ball when sticking it.

The guys told me that this was my best defense game ever. I made a big mistake just beside our net when trying to clear the zone on my knees, I hacked the ball. It went right in front of the net. If there had been an opponent in the crest, he would have got a great scoring opportunity! I've been told to shoot the ball on the boards beside the net or behind the net next time. That's good advice.

This team is supposed to be a permanent team. This is exactly what I was hoping. I'm tired of playing on individual teams where you can expect to play with the least talentful players. And our goalie is great! What we need now is to rent a rink for a few hours and create game strategies, train players on how to play, etc.

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11-13-2005, 09:47 PM
  #27
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We played our last game of the regular season in ball hockey against the second worst team, the first one being us! We were beaten 4-3! Their third goal was my fault. I was pretty frustrated, so instead of clearing the defense zone, I chose to shoot as hard as I could one someone's leg. It did not pay off, as someone caught the ball and scored! On another play, an opponent got a break-away. As I was pretty sure he would score, I threw my stick in front of him. He had a penalty shot, but lost the ball while running. He never had the chance to shoot.

On the positive side, I played a very good game, and for the first time with that team, I had fun. At least we could compete with the other team. It changes from the 10-0 score. I was more physical than usual, putting my body in others' way, pushing them around without exaggerating. I received a few hockey sticks in the legs and back, so I must have done a great job. I had a good shot on goal. I did not shoot extremely hard, but hard enough, and most importantly, I kept the shot low and on net. I am a much better runner than I used to be, so I arrive to the ball faster. As someone pointed out, if you have the speed you can get the ball before the opponent does even if he has more talent than you do. His talent will be of no use if you outrun him. Since I run faster, I now get more space, so more time to look around and see to whom I can pass the ball.

It seems to me that at every game, I reach a new level of hockey. I'm very proud of myself. I make mistakes, but better plays. In the future there will be fewer of these mistakes and more of these good plays. It's up to me to keep up the physical shape that I have. That's my best advice to beginners: Reach the best physical shape as you can, and you'll AUTOMATICALLY increase your value as hockey player. It takes time and energy, but it's so worthwhile. I believe the best place you can invest is in your health.

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11-16-2005, 10:50 PM
  #28
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We played our first and last game of the playoffs this fall ball hockey season. All the teams make the playoffs. We played against a very good team who should have beaten us up if they had had their best player who used to play in tiers 1; we play tiers 4. They were leading 1-0 after the first half of the game, which already is an accomplishment for a crappy team like ours. Our goalie got tired and gave four more goals. But I was happy with the way we played anyway. It was fun. As some people suggested to me, I played with the desire of winning instead of telling myself we would be easily defeated. I gave EVERYTHING I had. That's the most physical game I have ever played. Trying to avoid penalities, I tried to be as most physical as I could. On the board, when I saw an opponent with the ball, instead of trying to hack the ball, I moved on the guy and try to stamp him on the board so he no longer moves without charging him. I was pretty successful at it. I was not that much in front of the net, though. I tried to push away the opponent from behind, but could not move him at all. Next time, I think I should put myself in front of him, face him, and push him so he loses his balance. What do you think?

My control of the ball has improved alot. In defense, I was successful in clearing the ball off our zone. On an occasion, I shot the ball high in the air. Unfortunately, an opponent at the red line intercepted the ball, and shot it back in our zone. Next time, if I have some time, I will look at where he is before shooting.


I signed up to a gym last May. I went only 3 times! Always a good reason: Too cold, too hot, too late, too tired, blah blah blah... See my new thread for more details...

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11-24-2005, 11:10 PM
  #29
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A disaster today: The other team did not have a goalie. Yet they easily beat us 5 to 1! How embarrasing! A teamate brought his cousin with him. He turned out to be a big no-good. He was just walking around aimlessly. He cannot be the only guilty. We lost as a team. One of our defenseman got pissed off at everyone on our team. He`s the only who scored for us, actually. When I saw we had a break in the neutral zone, I left my defense position and joined the left wing and the centerman to support an attack. I took a shot at the net, but it was blocked in front. On the positive side, I noticed I have greatly increased my speed. I run faster than ever. I need to keep working at it. If you have legs, you can escape opponents, you can run to a place where you will have space and time to get a good shot at the net. Also, you'll win the race for the ball in the corners. In front of the net, I pushed the guys from the side, from the rear and from the front, I lifted their sticks, gave them some shoulder hits, grabbed their arms, pushed them of the board -without checking them, etc. I did everything I could have thought of, and avoided stupid things like passing in the middle. My best play tonight was when they had a two on one. I rushed back to the defense zone, and caught up the opponent. He got the pass, but I hit the ball away from his stick. It could have been a goal. I was impressed with my running.

I did not care not winning tonight. I just wanted to experiment a bit to find better ways of playing defense. It's a loss on paper, but it's a win because I learned alot. When you learn, you improve.

I watched the game after ours. Oh man, that's a total different level of hockey! That's hockey! We're just kids compared to them.

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11-25-2005, 12:30 PM
  #30
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I've just got a thought: No one blamed the offensemen for yesterday's loss. How com is it that the defensemen get the blame for a loss, but never -or rarely- the offensemen??? How ironic that the only goal that we scored was scored by a defenseman!

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11-25-2005, 03:58 PM
  #31
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haha awesome. sound like youre doing pretty good out there. i enjoy reading your game reports. keep it up!

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11-25-2005, 05:00 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barfy2000
haha awesome. sound like youre doing pretty good out there. i enjoy reading your game reports. keep it up!
Thanks, buddy! A few things to improve: Handle the boucing balls better. When they do, I try to hit them but miss them most of the times. The opponent often gets it, and goes in direction of our goalie. The other thing is that after I shot on net, I stay there watching if the ball will go in. I forget about the man I was covering.

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11-25-2005, 10:55 PM
  #33
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I only read a couple of posts on this thread but here's my advise:

1) First off and most important, talk to your goalie. Communication is very important, often you might be screening him/her or you might not see someone going into the slot, your goalie has the best view of all the action around so sometimes he/she needs to tell you what's going on.

2) Try not to screen your goalie, always play the pass first. The one timer is deadly, if your gaolie doesn't need to focus on two men the chances of them making a save goes up exponentially.

3) Don't be afraid of getting down to block a shot. If you drop to your knees and lay your stick out in the passing lane you basically cut off all options that the forward has(atleast without making a great play).

4) Poke check. enuff said.

5) a long stick is great for poke checks and shots from point. the problem is they are heavier and it's harder to puck handle.

6) Communication, yes i said it again! Talk to your goalie and your defenseman. The best defense communicates well, tell eachother to pinch or to stay back. Communication is very VERY important.

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11-26-2005, 12:00 AM
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBLfan
I only read a couple of posts on this thread but here's my advise:

1) First off and most important, talk to your goalie. Communication is very important, often you might be screening him/her or you might not see someone going into the slot, your goalie has the best view of all the action around so sometimes he/she needs to tell you what's going on.

2) Try not to screen your goalie, always play the pass first. The one timer is deadly, if your gaolie doesn't need to focus on two men the chances of them making a save goes up exponentially.

3) Don't be afraid of getting down to block a shot. If you drop to your knees and lay your stick out in the passing lane you basically cut off all options that the forward has(atleast without making a great play).

4) Poke check. enuff said.

5) a long stick is great for poke checks and shots from point. the problem is they are heavier and it's harder to puck handle.

6) Communication, yes i said it again! Talk to your goalie and your defenseman. The best defense communicates well, tell eachother to pinch or to stay back. Communication is very VERY important.
Excellent points! Let me reply to some of them:

1) I screened my goalie once yesterday. The shot was coming. I just froze not knowing if I should stop it or let the goalie have it. When I decided to step sideways, the goalie just had the time to make the save. I did not help him on this one. Unless it is a weak shot, I will leave it to the goalie.

5) On my both teams, we hardly ever communicate. I'll convince the guys this Sunday we have to. For instance, on the draw deep in our territory, when I get the ball I avoid passing forward. I prefer to run to the back of the net. I will tell my teamates in advance that I am going to do that and pass to one of them on the other side of the net. Otherwise, I will have to clear by the board, and we'll get an icing. Unless... I have just had that thought... What if I keep going with it? If I am quick enough and if I have only their defender to beat, I will keep going. If I can just pass by him, I'll get a breakaway. Sounds easy, but... Well, you have to try things! In the worst scenario, if the defender gets the ball, I'll go back at him and fight for the ball.

Sunday I will fight like I've never done it before. We have to use roughness or we'll be the joke of that division again. I want the other teams to respect us even if we're gonna be the crappiest team. Of course, I'll do that without hurting anyone or getting penalities. You have to try your hardest every game or you may as well stay home.

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11-26-2005, 12:19 AM
  #35
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don't forget to talk during the games. Tell the goalie to let you know that you're screening him. Example: "16(16 being the jersey number) left" or "Brad(being the name or nickname) left" that means that you need to move a foot to your left.

Watch a NHL goalie, he's always screaming and pointing. Remember that the goalie has the best view of the ice/playing surface.

The biggest mistake that you can make on defense is not playing as a cohesive unit. Again, watch the NHL the team that is communicating and working as a unit as opposed to individuals will win every time.

Another tip would be to hang out after the games. I know that i'd personally rather play a game with friends then playing with guys I hardly know. It's just a level of comfort. Talk about the game, ask for tips from them. Compliment them on good plays. After home games quite a few of the tampa bay lightning go out to drink together(this i know for a fact), also during the lockout 4-6 of them played together in practice like scrimages 2-3 times a week. Why would you care about what these guys do after the game? Because these guys are the Stanley Cup champs.

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11-26-2005, 12:31 AM
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBLfan
don't forget to talk during the games. Tell the goalie to let you know that you're screening him. Example: "16(16 being the jersey number) left" or "Brad(being the name or nickname) left" that means that you need to move a foot to your left.

Watch a NHL goalie, he's always screaming and pointing. Remember that the goalie has the best view of the ice/playing surface.

The biggest mistake that you can make on defense is not playing as a cohesive unit. Again, watch the NHL the team that is communicating and working as a unit as opposed to individuals will win every time.

Another tip would be to hang out after the games. I know that i'd personally rather play a game with friends then playing with guys I hardly know. It's just a level of comfort. Talk about the game, ask for tips from them. Compliment them on good plays. After home games quite a few of the tampa bay lightning go out to drink together(this i know for a fact), also during the lockout 4-6 of them played together in practice like scrimages 2-3 times a week. Why would you care about what these guys do after the game? Because these guys are the Stanley Cup champs.
I want to rent the rink a few times this season so we train people on how to play cohesively. Right now, each one does his own stuff and we have no idea what the other has in mind. When the ball comes to us, it is often to our amazement. "I have the ball! What am I supposed to do with it???". Or sometimes it is so obvious to you that your teamate should pass the ball to you. The pass never comes... You want to cry or you get pissed off. People need to know what covering the man is all about. Example: On a draw yesterday, I was defenseman and the other guy offenseman. He asked me if I wanted to cover the defenseman or the winger. I could not believe it!!!

One of the worst thing we do is that we let the pointers completely by themselves in our zone. Then they say the defense collapsed!

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11-26-2005, 11:06 AM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeylover
I want to rent the rink a few times this season so we train people on how to play cohesively. Right now, each one does his own stuff and we have no idea what the other has in mind. When the ball comes to us, it is often to our amazement. "I have the ball! What am I supposed to do with it???". Or sometimes it is so obvious to you that your teamate should pass the ball to you. The pass never comes... You want to cry or you get pissed off. People need to know what covering the man is all about. Example: On a draw yesterday, I was defenseman and the other guy offenseman. He asked me if I wanted to cover the defenseman or the winger. I could not believe it!!!

One of the worst thing we do is that we let the pointers completely by themselves in our zone. Then they say the defense collapsed!
lol wow, the answer to all of this is communication. You guys could save some cash by practicing defense on a tennis court and making/buying a goal.

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11-26-2005, 11:52 PM
  #38
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Originally Posted by TBLfan
lol wow, the answer to all of this is communication. You guys could save some cash by practicing defense on a tennis court and making/buying a goal.
Now that snow is here, it`s too late for a tennis court. But thanks for putting me on the right track. I will look for a place to gather. I think we should leave the goalie home. I don't want that gathering to turn into a intra-team game. I would make a first gathering just for training people on the defensive aspect of the game: What to do in front of our net, what to do when an opponent with the ball is coming in our direction, how to clear the zone, etc. We'll show people what to do, and only then we'll stimulate a game and we'll see how we do. The next gathering will be for offense: What to do in the offense zone, how to shoot the ball, passing the ball around, passing to the pointer, to show the centerman that he should be in the creast, etc. An important thing will be to plan what points should be covered so we're not losing our time and money.

When I see during the warm-ups people shooting on the goalie, I really wonder why. What we really need to improve is the handling of the ball. What we should practice instead is passing the ball.

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11-27-2005, 06:18 AM
  #39
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Sorry for jacking your thread hockeylover, but anyone got some advice on D for non-contact ice hockey?

I play foward on my school team, which is filled with AAA players. If I switch to D, I might be able to dress a game.

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11-27-2005, 04:27 PM
  #40
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We lost 3-2 today in our first ball hockey game. I played a heck of a game, anyway. A few players told me I was the best defenseman of our team. That will surely boosts my confidence! I played aggressively in our zone, putting my arm around opponents, hitting and holding sticks, cleared the zone high in the air, looking up when in possession of the ball, retreated to the back of our net, blocking shots from opponents sliding on the floor or putting my stick a few inches in front of the shooter's stick which resulted in ball hitting the roof, etc. Another aspect where I am at very good is when the opponent is coming in my direction thinking he will fool me with his moves. That play is really exciting because either you look like a hero or you look like a zero. I bent the knees and lowered my body, and each time, about 4 times, I stopped the ball.

One thing that helped us much in the game is the other team! They did not put too much pressure on our defensemen, so we had space and time to make plays. Finally, that was the game where I have been most active in my young career. I'm no longer just a spectator. That's my individual performance.

On the team performance, we had more shots that usual. Many games we had 5 shots on goal in the whole game... Today we had 12, which is extremely good, for us anyway. On the negative side, our man covering in our defense zone is a complete failure. The pointers are very rarely covered and we have two men covering the same guy in front of the net... They almost always get a man uncovered waiting for the ball. If the player is good, then it's almost a sure goal.

On the communication side that a few here touched upon, I tried to do one thing about it today. I told my defense partner that we should pass to each other more. We both agreed on that. He had several occasions, but never made the pass. I can't blame him since I did not do it myself... But we'll work at it.

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11-27-2005, 06:34 PM
  #41
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I always try to force people to their backhand. It takes away their shot, forces them wide and on to bad angles and makes it easy on the goalie since short side is the only option. And put your stick into the forwards hands-not slashing, not hooking, just little taps to annoy them and maybe cough the puck up.

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11-27-2005, 06:40 PM
  #42
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Originally Posted by Tikkanen
I always try to force people to their backhand. It takes away their shot, forces them wide and on to bad angles and makes it easy on the goalie since short side is the only option. And put your stick into the forwards hands-not slashing, not hooking, just little taps to annoy them and maybe cough the puck up.
These are two great suggestions! I will add them to my list.

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11-28-2005, 03:11 PM
  #43
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don't forget it's not a penalty to lift the guys stick with yours

he can't shoot if his stick is 1 foot off the ground

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11-28-2005, 08:48 PM
  #44
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Originally Posted by TBLfan
don't forget it's not a penalty to lift the guys stick with yours

he can't shoot if his stick is 1 foot off the ground
This tip is great! I don't see too many players on my team doing it! When I have a man to cover in front of the net, that's the first thing I'll try to do.

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11-28-2005, 09:59 PM
  #45
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Originally Posted by Hockeylover
This tip is great! I don't see too many players on my team doing it! When I have a man to cover in front of the net, that's the first thing I'll try to do.

haha good idea! just make sure that you get only their stick. you dont wanna get an unneccessary hooking call. same thing goes for poke checks. make sure you get the puck as cleanly as posssible.

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11-29-2005, 01:23 PM
  #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barfy2000
haha good idea! just make sure that you get only their stick. you dont wanna get an unneccessary hooking call. same thing goes for poke checks. make sure you get the puck as cleanly as posssible.
yeah, watch the hook because they are going to try to kick the puck in front and move away from you and you're naturally going to hook them. and we all know that a getting hooking minor is not good D.

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11-29-2005, 04:57 PM
  #47
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Originally Posted by TBLfan
yeah, watch the hook because they are going to try to kick the puck in front and move away from you and you're naturally going to hook them. and we all know that a getting hooking minor is not good D.
Great reminder on the hook! I know it's also hard not to hook when you start getting the habit of it.

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11-29-2005, 09:21 PM
  #48
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I have read that some of you suggested that when you're defenseman in front of your net in your territory, the guy you're covering should be in front of you while others expressed that you should be behind him. The advantage of being in front of him is that you can cut off a pass to him, but you may lose him of sight. The advantage to be behind him is that you see him at all time, but if he deflects a ball or gets the ball, it will probably too late for you to do anything about it. What I'm gonna try to do tomorrow is to stay BESIDE him. I will try to keep physical contact with him. If he's gone, I'll know it right away and I'll make physical contact with him again. If he gets the ball, I will push him to make him lose his balance and lift his stick. Those two things seem be easier to do when you're beside the man. Anyway, I'll tell you about the results. If you have any suggestions, let me know.

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11-30-2005, 12:42 PM
  #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeylover
I have read that some of you suggested that when you're defenseman in front of your net in your territory, the guy you're covering should be in front of you while others expressed that you should be behind him. The advantage of being in front of him is that you can cut off a pass to him, but you may lose him of sight. The advantage to be behind him is that you see him at all time, but if he deflects a ball or gets the ball, it will probably too late for you to do anything about it. What I'm gonna try to do tomorrow is to stay BESIDE him. I will try to keep physical contact with him. If he's gone, I'll know it right away and I'll make physical contact with him again. If he gets the ball, I will push him to make him lose his balance and lift his stick. Those two things seem be easier to do when you're beside the man. Anyway, I'll tell you about the results. If you have any suggestions, let me know.
Beside him is a great way to play most of the time. Because you take away the pass and you can still be physical with him without screening your goalie. Always remember that the goalie isn't worried about the shot, he's worried about the one-timer. Oh and if you get behind him repeated pokes to his elbow(right elbow if he shoots lefty, left elbow if he shoots righty) will mess up his shot... poke with the heel of your stick to make sure you don't hook him.

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12-01-2005, 10:08 AM
  #50
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Another ball hockey game tonight. We lost 5-0. Our goalie did not show up! He did not even call us to let us know! We had to ask the goalie who played the game before ours. He was already very tired when he started the game with us.

I did not start very well for me when I blocked a shot from the point. I got the ball on the calf. I felt on the floor and could hardly get back up. The referee asked me if I wanted a whistle. My ego pushed me to say no because I did not want people to laugh at me. Next time I will say yes. The result of this is that I played at 60% of my potential.

Here are a few observations of my game tonight. I played defense.

1) "When in doubt in your defense zone, take some time behind your own net to think about what play to make"

That, I did that. On every draw in our zone on which I could get the ball, I went at the back of the net and took a good look to see the best play to make.

2) "Communication with the goalie is important"

The goalie told me to get out of the way on a shot. I did, and he could make the save because he saw the ball coming at him.

3) I avoided passing in the middle when there was a chance the ball would be intercepted.

4) "Know where your teamates are at all times"

That's an area that really needs to be improved. I will have to improve my periphiral vision.

5) "Do not take chances in your own zone"

Against such a good team we played tonight, I made sure to follow that advice...

6) "When shooting on goal, shot low"

I had only one occasion to shoot tonight. I missed the net by a good 10 feet, but it was relatively hard and low. I will practice.

7) "Get rid of the habit of trying to cover two men at the same time. One is well enough"

I forgot about that...

What differentiated that game from the others is that their the other team's attackers were always in movement in the creast. I was covering one man, he ran the other way, I followed him, another man took his place, and of course, no one was covering him. I went to the uncovered man who ran the other way just to be replaced by the other man who was then uncovered. It was as if they always had a man advantage.

Oh, by the way, we had THREE shots on net in the whole game...

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