HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Learning to skate..

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old
01-27-2006, 04:24 PM
  #1
Yureeka47*
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Moscow, Russia
Country: Russian Federation
Posts: 471
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to Yureeka47*
Learning to skate..

Hello! Im embarassed to admit, but im almost 19 years old and I can't skate. I'm about to start going to the rink routinely to practice. But before i just randomly glide around holding on to the side of the boards, are there any tips out there that can help me learn quicker?

Also, is it a fair statement to say if I learn how to roller blade well, I will be able to skate just as well? (easier to rollerblade down the road or in a park than driving to a rink and following their schedule rather than mine).

Thanks!

Yureeka47* is offline  
Old
01-27-2006, 04:51 PM
  #2
anguscertified
HFB Partner
 
anguscertified's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 20,019
vCash: 500
roller-blading should help quite a bit.

anguscertified is offline  
Old
01-27-2006, 05:12 PM
  #3
nikebauer
Registered User
 
nikebauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 867
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to nikebauer
Stopping in roller and ice is totally different though...don't bring your roller habbits into ice

nikebauer is offline  
Old
01-27-2006, 05:53 PM
  #4
bladoww
Team of the Future
 
bladoww's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Country: United States
Posts: 1,551
vCash: 500
I grew up in Florida and have been playing inline since day one. I can honestly say that if you were to play on sportcourt or something similar (and once you get the skill level to do it), stopping with inlines or on ice really isnt all that much different.

I will say however that on ice there is alot more "gliding" going on so to speak. So yeah they are different animals but your inline skills will help a ton when it comes to balance, turning, etc.

Heck my hockey skills helped me when I went skiing for the first time a few years ago, being able to go straight and stop!

bladoww is offline  
Old
01-27-2006, 11:41 PM
  #5
sc37
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: OH-IO
Country: Hong Kong
Posts: 1,552
vCash: 713
Skiing and hockey skating got a lot in common there actually.

Rollerblading is a plus...but that sorta depends on what your rollerblading with. I had normal fitness blades and that didn't quite have the feel as ice skating. Roller hockey skates did on the other hand with the hi-lo wheel set up.

Some tips...learn to fall once you do that, don't be afraid to let go of the wall or you'll never learn. Gliding is the key. Stop by doing a snow-plow and adding pressure to the front foot. Maybe try skating backwards and go from there...some people find that easier to do for some reason.

sc37 is offline  
Old
01-28-2006, 06:37 PM
  #6
majorheadache
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 20
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yureeka47
Hello! Im embarassed to admit, but im almost 19 years old and I can't skate. I'm about to start going to the rink routinely to practice. But before i just randomly glide around holding on to the side of the boards, are there any tips out there that can help me learn quicker?

Also, is it a fair statement to say if I learn how to roller blade well, I will be able to skate just as well? (easier to rollerblade down the road or in a park than driving to a rink and following their schedule rather than mine).

Thanks!
Why are yo uembaressed. I know lots of folks who can't skate.

The delta between roller and ice are not THAT great. with some notable exceptions.

1) DON'T try a hockey stop on the pavement, road rash is an ugly thing.

2)Gliding does not really happen in inline, though the better the grease the better you glide (don;t fall for the abec5 over ABEC 7 it's all hype). This however should give you stronger legs for ockey as you are constantly moveing your legs to keep you momentum.

3) Ice is MUCH more forgiving than sport court or asphalt. Inline is a GOOD way to correct any skate dragging etc. that many pick up from Ice skating.



majorheadache is offline  
Old
01-30-2006, 07:57 AM
  #7
Allsmokenopancake
Registered User
 
Allsmokenopancake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Donegal, Ireland
Country: Ireland
Posts: 347
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yureeka47
Hello! Im embarassed to admit, but im almost 19 years old and I can't skate. I'm about to start going to the rink routinely to practice. But before i just randomly glide around holding on to the side of the boards, are there any tips out there that can help me learn quicker?

Also, is it a fair statement to say if I learn how to roller blade well, I will be able to skate just as well? (easier to rollerblade down the road or in a park than driving to a rink and following their schedule rather than mine).

Thanks!
This is a thread I made a while back, asking how soon from starting, it takes to get playing hockey. I know exactly what you feel like.
http://www.hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=188803


Now, I posted this back in november. At that stage I had taken a pre-alpha skating class (which teaches from the point of never having been on the ice, so I recommend that) and been to the rink a couple of times a week. I am also still taking lessons, they do alpha, beta etc up to advanced. And it was just on saturday morning that I felt something click, and it was such a good feeling. I had just about got the right foot over left crossovers down, but doing left to right felt like writing with the wrong hand or something.

But this weekend everything sort of clicked, so I am feeling better on my skates, and am going to start stick and puck soon.

Practice is your best friend with this. I also have started rollerblading in the park and its helping me. I do not try to do any sort of stops apart from using the break (I have fitness skates not roller hockey skates) because the techniques are different. But for striding and crossovers, I think it has helped me.

Get on the ice as much as you can, and roller blade as much as you can, just to get used to the feeling of balancing on an edge, rather than the whole foot support you get with your shoes.

And don't be embarrassed. I am 28 and only learning, better late than never. I hope to be in a beginner hockey class by the fall, that gives me 6 more months to improve skating, and get to stick and pucks and pick up, so will be ready for it.

Good luck, and enjoy

Allsmokenopancake is offline  
Old
01-30-2006, 09:27 AM
  #8
NJDevs430
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 1,901
vCash: 500
I was never good at what people might classically call "balance"...so I figured I'd never be able to skate. But I wanted to learn. I pictured myslef in a skating class as the only 36 year old skating in a chain of six year olds...if I fall down, it's mass carnage.
<)-:{
A little over a year ago, I was mentioning this to a co-worker and she told me that she skated often and invited me to join her.
So I rented a pair of skates (she advised that I should start off on figure skates until I get my balance) and stepped out onto the ice. She led me around skating backwards. Naturally, I was scared. But I wasn't the only mid-life skating crisis on the ice, either.
I wall-crawled a lot. The wall became my friend. I propelled myself along the wall, using it to keep me from falling. I also rented some library books on skating and they helped a lot (Laura Stamm's Powerskating was a particularly good one). I visualized the way the skates were sharpened, and how to use that to help propel myself along. I practiced my balance and instead of propelling myself forward along the boards with my hands while gliding, I used the wall to steady myself and walked along the wall in a side-to-side motion, which, as it turns out, is the proper stride for skating. My friend tried to teach me this, I read about it...but I didn't really get it until I tried it for myself. Finally, I was able to stride and glide and not slip and slide. One day, it just clicked.
Like Allsmoke said...when it 'clicks', it's a great feeling.
Don't get me wrong...it won't be easy at first, and you will fall.
But you will thank yourself for it. Since I've started learning, my balance and posture have improved, I have more confidence and my teeth are whiter.
Finally, get your own skates when you're ready. Rental skates are good for a while, but I could have bought a good pair of skates for all the money I spent renting them. When I was using figure skates, I rented all the time. After I had enough confidence, I rented hockey skates (there is a different feeling when you first go from figure to hockey, but the fundamentals are pretty much the same). But the skates I rented were too long and too narrow. Once I got my own skates, there was a world of difference.
I am going to sign up for lessons. I'm sure I've taught myself a plethora of bad habits. At 37, the dream of breaking into the NHL is obviously dead, but I just want to skate well enough to be able to play pick-up with some freinds.
Good luck!

NJDevs430 is offline  
Old
01-30-2006, 10:29 AM
  #9
mobius
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1
vCash: 500
I won't give any real tips, but here's what I've learned. I started 3 years ago (30 yrs old then) having skated maybe 5 times in my life. I started on Bauer Off-Ice In-lines to get the feeling. Once I could balance, I went to ice. There are some things that are easier to get the fundamentals down on roller because the speed is not as great. I could not cross over for the longest time until I figured it out on my in-lines. Same thing for backward crossovers. I learned on my in-lines first, then took what I had learned to the ice. Now, Iím a Level 3 USA Hockey ref and am doing high school games. I play in the high D level, but skate at about a C-B level. (I just canít handle the puck to save my life.) For the last 3 years, Iíve probably averaged about 3 hours a week on the ice just skating around. Mostly in public skate sessions. People ask me whatís the trick, Practice.

When I first started, all the hockey players told me that they hated in-lines now because of the difference. I didnít notice much difference at first. I went and put on my in-lines for the first time in a year, and felt like a drunken 5 year old. I couldnít stay up, couldnít stop, couldnít do anything right. So now I know what they meant. Don't try a hockey stop on asphalt! OUCH.

mobius is offline  
Old
01-30-2006, 02:29 PM
  #10
mazmin
Go! Jets! Go!
 
mazmin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Toronto
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,838
vCash: 500
I've been iceskating since I was 3 and rollerblading since I was seven. I am now 21. Rollerblading will help you learn to ice skate but it is not quite the same. I'd compare rollerblading to speedskating where the majority of the blade touches the ice/ground and you build up a lot of speed with big powerful strokes. For iceskating, only a small portion of the blade should be touching the ice (since the blade is rockered). This gives you a lot of freedom in directional movement (especially changing direction at high speed).

Iceskating is hard to learn. It takes a lot of patience and you will get a few bruises. Generally it takes about four years to learn to iceskate well. Stopping properly is one of the hardest things for people to learn. If you are experienced in skiing, snowboarding or wakeboarding you might learn a bit quicker because of similar reliance on balance and "edges".

If you have a little time and money take a powerskating class if you can find one. Proper technique is important and teaching yourself will be a lot slower.

Good luck.

mazmin is offline  
Old
02-01-2006, 01:24 AM
  #11
Blackjack
Registered User
 
Blackjack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: keyjhboardd +bro]ke
Posts: 6,034
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by mobius
Iíve probably averaged about 3 hours a week on the ice just skating around. Mostly in public skate sessions. People ask me whatís the trick, Practice.
Listen to this guy.

I was in almost exactly the same situation as you, just 2 years older (21, this is about 3 years ago.)

Here are my tips:

1. **MOST IMPORTANT** Please Please PLEASE do NOT rent your skates. I cannot emphasise this enough. Rental skates are designed for longevity, so they are build completely rigid. It is almost impossible to flex your ankles in them, and this means you can't bend your knees. I would go as far as to say that it's impossible to learn how to skate in rental skates (well, beyond the most basic stuff) another danger is that if you use rental skates you might hate it so much that you give up.

2. There are really two elements of skating. Balance and strength. The balance part is actually not to hard. It will seem hard at first, but it's like riding a bike.

The reason it takes so much longer to learn to skate is because of the strength part. The stabilizing muscles in your ankles, legs, and back need to be tremendously strong. The only way to do this (that I know of) is to skate skate skate skate. The more you skate, the stronger those muscles will get, and the better you will skate, it's as simple as that.

I'm a maniac - I try to get to the arena 2 or 3 times a week in addition to playing hockey once a week. But it's worth it. Compared to the guys who just go out and buy pads without learning how to skate first, it's like I have rockets in my skates. I'm just now starting to get on the level of the more experinced players.

How do you think it feels to score a goal against guys who have been playing since childhood? Tonight I scored two

Mobius: It's funny you said that. I'm also probably a B/C level skater, and I also can't handle the puck to save my life. I bet it has to do with the fact that I learned to skate at public sessions where you can't have a stick/puck on the ice.

Blackjack is offline  
Old
02-02-2006, 03:36 PM
  #12
Petey21
Registered User
 
Petey21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Sweden
Country: Sweden
Posts: 1,359
vCash: 500
Here are some links with skating tips and tutorials you can check out, even some video instructions. Combine these with practicing hard and you'll master it.

http://robbyglantz.com/ForwardCrossunder.html

http://www.powerskating.ca/

Petey21 is offline  
Old
02-04-2006, 07:27 AM
  #13
92hatchattack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Jersey
Posts: 1,338
vCash: 500
Nice thread. Man, i too an 23 years old... to be 24 next tuesday. I am wanting to learn to play hockey as it is a great sport. I used to aggresive inline but havent been on a pair of inlines in about 3 years. But for my B-day my fiancee has gotten me a pair of skates that i had wanted. The 06' Mission 5500's. THEY ARE SITTING IN HER CAR AND ITS KILLING ME!

Anyway... good luck. I found that years ago ice skating is alot like rollerblading. Once you get on the ice it feels very diffrent, but after you get comfortable and make a few adjustments youll be able to aply the concepts of blading to ice skating.
\
By the way, anyone here ever aggro skate, and how similar would the royale trick be to a hopckey stop???? Im guessing very similar beingt hat they are goth gliding movement that require balance. Im really hoping to jump on ice skates on day and bust out a hardcore hockey stop on the first try!

92hatchattack is offline  
Old
02-04-2006, 01:25 PM
  #14
CloudReader
Registered User
 
CloudReader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Montreal
Posts: 582
vCash: 500
This is what I've learned from my somewhat limited experience rollerblading and playing hockey, so this might not apply to everyone. Learning to rollerblade well before stepping on to the ice has its benefits, but also its pains.

Rollerblading will really help you build up speed on the ice. It's alot harder to gain and maintain your speed on a road than on ice, so you really learn how to use your muscles, and develop a posture (after like a month or two, skating everyday). This will translate well on to the ice.

However, going from inline to ice takes a transition periode. Turning is harder on the ice (less friction, more speed, and learning to really dig in into the ice), and stopping is completely different. As I mentioned before, rollerblading first will really make you go fast on ice. This is not good for learning how to stop. Because of this, I have never learned how to stop properly on ice. I just make really tight turns. As some highschool teacher have told me, while turning put pressure towards your heels, and while stopping, pressure towards your toes.

Another thing connected to hockey but not necessarily to skating is puck-handling. If you rollerblade, and develop your skating first, your puck-handling skills will sorta suck as some previous posters have hinted at . If you wanna learn skating to play hockey, don't delay the puck+stick part of it. I rollerblade during the entire summer, and play a tiny amount of hockey during winter, and I can't puck-handle either.

Anyways, the solution to all the problems is to practice alot. Playing hockey is the best I find, because it developps your different skills simultaneously.

Good Luck and don't be afraid to fall!

CloudReader is offline  
Closed Thread

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:20 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2014 All Rights Reserved.