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All Time Draft# 5 Bios

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Old
04-14-2006, 05:58 PM
  #26
pappyline
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Dit Clapper (Aubrey V.)

The first player to play 20 NHL seasons and the last active player that played during the 1920ís. Clapper was an all-star both as a right wing and as a defenseman. An outstanding lacrosse player as a young teen-ager, he then decided to concentrate on hockey. After a half-season in the minor leagues, he joined the Bruins in 1927.

Clapper played on Boston's "Dynamite Line" with Cooney Weiland at center and Dutch Gainor at left wing. They led the Bruins to their first Stanley Cup in 1929. In 1929/30, Clapper had his finest scoring season with 41 goals and 20 assists in just 44 games, finishing third in the NHL in total points.

In 1937, the 200-pound Clapper became a defenseman. Two years later, the Bruins won their second Stanley Cup. Clapper was named a first team all-star that year and the next two years.
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Clapper became Boston's player-coach in 1945 and continued coaching through the 1948/49 season. When he retired as a player on February 12, 1947, a capacity crowd applauded as he received $7,500 worth of gifts. His uniform number, 5, was the first ever retired by the Bruins. The HOF waived its customary 3 year waiting period and immediately inducted him on the night of his retirement. Until he was named as coach, he had served as team captain for longer than any NHL player would until Bourque and Yzerman.

He is mentioned in the movie Slapshot with Toe Blake as prime examples of old time hockey - the way hockey is supposed to be played.

In 833 regular season games, he scored 228 goals and had 248 assists, with 13 goals and 19 assists in 89 playoff games.

Awards

1st all star defense; 1939, 40, 41
2nd all star defense: 1944
2nd all star right wing; 1931, 1935

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04-14-2006, 06:20 PM
  #27
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Doug Bentley (from Hockey legends site)

Doug Bentley's life in hockey stretched over some 30 years, beginning with the Delisle Tigers in his hometown in Saskatchewan and finishing as a coach in the Western Hockey League. He played most of his minor hockey with the Moose Jaw Millers and joined the Chicago Black Hawks for the 1939-40 season, and the following year his brother Max joined the team. In 1943-47 they played with Bill Mosienko on a line that became known as the Pony Line due to their size and speed.

Doug played left wing and was known as a "complete" player. Although he weighed only 145 pounds during his heyday, he had tremendous speed and was a natural goal scorer. Six times he had 20 or more goals in a season, and in 1942-43 he led the NHL in points even though the team finished in fifth place and out of the playoffs. It was during that season that the Bentleys made history. Their youngest brother, Reggie, was called up from the minors and played 11 games with Doug and Max, the first time three brothers played as a complete forward line. Doug was also exciting to watch and frequently had more ice time than anyone else in the game. Because of his speed, he was one of the great backcheckers of his era as well.
For the first few years of their hockey careers, the Bentley brothers played with a variety of linemates, but as a twosome they were always dangerous. The night of December 4, 1941, was one spectacular evening--just three days before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour--when the Hawks clobbered Montreal 9-2. Doug had a hat-trick in the game and Max assisted on all three goals.

On January 28, 1943, they and Bill Thoms had one of the best nights a line has ever had in the NHL. The Hawks beat the Rangers 10-1 and the three combined for 17 scoring points including six goals. Doug had two goals and six points; Max four and three; and Thom's five assists. Doug's career and life took an unexpected turn during the war. At the start of the 1944-45 season, the Hawks traveled to Canada to play an exhibition game. When it came time to cross the border to return to Chicago, Doug was denied permission to leave his homeland. As a result, he spent the entire year playing senior hockey for the Laura Beavers, out of the NHL.

Although he had much personal success, Doug's Hawks rarely excelled. He played 566 regular season games but only 23 playoff games, a clear reflection of the team's poor performance in the standings. Much of the blame for the team's failings rested on the shoulders of owner Bill Tobin, who took over as manager after the sudden death of Major McLaughlin on December 17, 1944. "Tobin is so cheap," Leafs owner Conn Smythe said, "that he wouldn't pay 10 cents to see the Statue of Liberty take a swan dive into New York Harbour."

In 1950 Doug Bentley was voted by the Herald American as the top hockey player in Chicago for the first half of the century.

Awards:
1st all star: 1943, 44, 47
2nd all star: 1947
Art Ross: 1942-43

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04-15-2006, 09:35 AM
  #28
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Pavel Bure, RW/LW

Quote:
The Russian Rocket was the most spectacular player in the nhl when in top shape physically and mentally. He could easily score 60 goals a yr.His effectivnes lies largely in his lightining speed. He is a pure goal scorer who operates instinctly where to go to pounce on the oppostion goalkeeper.He is a dazzling puck handler and he posses a howitzer of a shot.He is a gifted sniper.Pavel is a interesting mix of speed skill and power and his ability to execute at top flight makes him the most exciting player of our times.


Pavel Bure, the Russian Rocket, developed quickly as a youngster in the Soviet Union, and when he arrived in the NHL he proved to be that rare and thrilling player a pure goal scorer. His hero growing up was hall of famer Valeri Kharlamov, one of the standouts of the 1972 Summit Series. In his teenage years Bure came to the attention of the Soviet hockey machine and was given a roster spot on Viktor Tikhonov's Central Red Army team.

The 1989 World Junior Championships was a coming-out party for the players who'd been touted as the future of the game in the Soviet Union. In particular the line of Alexander Mogilny, Sergei Fedorov and Bure was expected to pick up where the famous KLM Line of Vladimir Krutov, Igor Larionov and Sergei Makarov had left off. But by 1991 all three young stars were making waves in the NHL. Bure, who had been selected as the top forward in that World Junior tournament, was the last of the three to defect to North America.


Bure joined the Vancouver Canucks in 1991-92, and won the Calder Trophy.

In 1992-93 Bure cemented his reputation as a world-class scorer, gathering 60 goals and 110 points. He scored another 60 the next season, leading the league in that department and earning First-Team All-Star honors. Only Mike Bossy and Wayne Gretzky had scored more goals in their first three NHL seasons.

Over the next few seasons Bure's development was slowed by injuries and the owners' lockout of 1994. Torn ligaments limited him to a mere 15 games in 1995-96. He was tentative and still far from his best during the next season, ending up with 23 goals and 55 points in 63 games. He regained much of his form in 1997-98, again breaking the 50-goal plateau and exciting crowds with his darting end-to-end rushes.

Bure played for Russia at the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, and the team won a silver medal. Pavel was selected as the tournament's top forward after his 9-goal performance led the field at the star-studded Games.

On January 17, 1999, Bure was traded to the Florida Panthers.

The relative anonymity enjoyed by hockey players in Florida suited Bure, who set out to right the Panther ship and had an immediate impact scoring 13 goals in 11 games before re injuring the ligament in his knee.

During the summer of 1999, Bure dedicated himself to strengthening the knee muscles that were so important to his high-flying game, and in his first full season with Florida he led the NHL with 58 goals, becoming the second man to win the Rocket Richard Trophy. He and his brother Valeri combined to set a league record for goals in one season by a pair of brothers with 93, surpassing the old mark set by Bobby and Dennis Hull. His hat-trick at the 2000 NHL All-Star Game in Toronto earned him the game's MVP award.

Bure went on to play two more seasons in Florida before he was dealt to the New York Rangers midway through the 2001-02 campaign. Upon his arrival in New York, Bure was counted on help the Rangers get back to the playoffs and respectibility, however, injuries over the course of the next two seasons limited the Russian Rocket's playing time.- Legends of hockey

After continuous problems with his knee, Bure announced his retirement from the game in 2005

NHL Totals 702 437 342 779 484 Playoff Totals 64 35 35 70 74

Calder Memorial Trophy 92 NHL 1st All-Star Team 94 2nd All-Star Team (00,01)
Best Forward at Olympic Games 98 Maurice "Rocket" Richard Trophy (00,01)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (93,94,97,98,00,01)

Ed Jovanovski, D

Quote:
Jovanovski is one of the most natural blueline talents in the NHL. Ed has size, toughness and strength. His overall ability makes him a difficult defender to play against. He is one of the best double threats among todays NHL defenseman in the game today. He can score goals from the backend and also unleash the beats with open-ice thunder. "Jovocop" has commanding speed, great size,good gobility and constant willingness to pinch in and create offensive opportunities


Ed Jovanovski showed flashes of his immense potential when he was with the Florida Panthers. Following a trade to the Vancouver Canucks, Jovanovski gradually developed into one of the best young defencemen in the game. He possessed abundant skill and strength.

He was drafted 1st overall by the Florida Panthers at the 1994 NHL Entry Draft. He was a valuable member of Canada's defence corps when they won gold at the 1995 World Junior Championships.

The burly young defender put forth a fairly solid effort in his rookie season in 1995-96 when he scored 21 points and helped Florida reach the Stanley Cup final. He was named to the NHL All-Rookie Team and seemed destined to rise up to the level of the league's elite defenders. Jovanovski was a reserve on Team Canada at the inaugural World Cup of hockey in 1996. He became a fixture on the Panthers defense. He scored two goals for Canada at the 1998 World Championships.

On January 17, 1999 he was traded to the Vancouver Canucks in a blockbuster deal that saw Pavel Bure end up in Florida. A member of Canada's entry at the 2000 World Championships, Jovanovski's began to excel on the blueline in 2000-01 and started to play like one of the game's elite defencemen--hitting, moving up ice with the puck, and dictating the pace of the game when on the ice.

During the 2001-02 season Jovanovski led all Canuck defencemen in scoring with 48-points and games played with 82. A member of Canada's gold medal team at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Jovanovski was looking to build on his success from 2001-02 in 2002-03.

After a broken foot sidelined him early on, Jovanovski returned to score 46 points in 67 games leading the Canucks into the post season. In 2003-04, Jovanovski and the Canucks dethroned the Colorado Avalanche as the Northwest Division Champions, yet were upset in the first round of the 2004 playoffs to the eventual Stanley Cup finalist Calgary Flames.

Jovanovski was named to Team Canada's entry for the 2004 World Cup of Hockey. However, he suffered a rib injury in the first game and that ended his tournament.

In the spring of 2005, Ed made his third appearance at the World Championship. Despite numerous injuries during 05-06 season he did still manage 33 points in only 44 games.

NHL Totals 687 86 231 317 -23 Playoff Totals 58 10 18 28 -9

NHL All-Rookie Team (1996)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (2001, 2002, 2003)


Jarome Iginla, RW

Has deceptive speed, great strength and a lethal shot. Can overpower defenders physically or use finesse. Possesses the soft hands of a natural goal-scorer. tsn.ca

Quote:
IggyĒ combines deceptive speed, strength, tenacity and great hands to pose a threat every time heís on the ice. Heís a rock-solid, do-it-all wing who can provide both scoring and leadership. One of the best along the boards and in the corners, Iginla is extremely strong and will take the pounding in front of the net. A power forward who doesnít play a traditional big manís game, since he usually carries the puck himself rather than wait for it in scoring position.Jerome can overpower defenders physically or use finesse. He has a deadly wrist shot and a goal scorers mentality

He was picked in the first round (11th overall) by the Dallas Stars in the 1995 NHL Entry Draft, then traded with Corey Millen to the Flames for Joe Nieuwendyk. Iginla's best season was 2001-02 when he had 96 points and 52 goals

Iginla was also a key member of Canada's Olympic gold medal-winning hockey team in 2002. This season elevated him to superstar status and he became a fan favourite. Jarome is widely regarded as one of the best players in the league today.

Iginla was named captain of the Calgary Flames in October 2003, making him the second Black player to be named captain of an NHL team. In 2004, Iginla helped the Flames advance to their first Stanley Cup Finals in 15 years. He recorded a Gordie Howe hat trick (a goal, an assist, and a fight) in Game 3 of the Finals when he fought Vincent Lecavalier. However, the Flames eventually lost to the Tampa Bay Lightning in seven games (although video replay suggested that the Flames scored an extra goal in game 6 which was not counted, which would have given them the cup.)

Iginla played in the 2006 Winter Olympics, where he was one of Team Canada's alternate captains.

NHL Totals 708 285 285 570 +28 508 Playoff Totals 29 14 11 25 +14 47

NHL All-Rookie Team (1997) NHL First All-Star Team (02)
Maurice "Rocket" Richard Trophy (2002) Art Ross Trophy (2002)
Lester B. Pearson Award (02) NHL 2nd All-Star Team (04)
King Clancy Memorial Trophy (04)
Maurice "Rocket" Richard Trophy (2004) (tied with Ilya Kovalchuk and Rick Nash) Played in NHL All-Star Game (02,03,04)

Paul Kariya, LW

Quote:

Paul Kariya -Practices the art of vissualization which made me see him as a key creative member of my all time team. When the hockey world visualizes his game they see all the elements that could lead him to the HOF someday. He is a 5 time NHL all star who has soft hands. Is also willing to shoot the puck from anywhere he is silky smooth skater, a great playmaker and has blazing acceleration and superior hockey sense because of tremendous hand/eye coordination, intelligence and awareness on the ice that is second to none and all of that is all delivered with a great shoot!

In the 1993 Entry Draft Kariya was selected 4th overall by Anaheim.

He played for Canada 1994 Olympics Games in Lillehammer, Norway. Kariya was Team Canada's top scorer in the tournament with four assists and three goals, However Peter Forsberg scored a sudden death shootouttgoal and a gold medal win for Sweden.

Kariya next step was 1994-95 with the Mighty Ducks where he scored 39 pts in 47 games.The next fall he became member of Canada's entry in the World Cup scoring 7 pts in 8 games.

The next season, 95-96, he exploded for 108 points in his first full year in the NHL. It was a pace he would continue over the following three seasons, collecting 227 points in 220 games.

In 1996 he formed selane formed twosome a dangerous and fast combination. Selanne had the speed and goal-scoring touch to take advantage of Kariya's innate ability to find the open man.

During 96-97 Kariya was named captain of the Ducks missed the first 11 games of the season due to injury, and his importance to the Mighty Ducks became apparent. The team won only one game during his absence. When he returned, Anaheim began to climb in the standings, earning a playoff spot by the end of the season. Kariya's 99 points in his shortened season and Anaheim's success ensured his name was among the final three considered for the Hart Trophy as the league's Most Valuable Player.

Just before he was to play in the 1998 All-Star Game, Kariya sustained his fourth concussion in a nasty incident involving Chicago's Gary Suter. Kariya never lost consciousness and could remember the details of the game. Only later did he feel the effects of the hit, the headaches and the memory loss. He missed the rest of the season and the Nagano Olympics because of post-concussion syndrome.

He returned to form the next season. Terrorizing defenders and goalies with Selanne, Kariya finished third in overall scoring in 1998-99.

In the summer of 2002, he was one of the original eight players named to Canada's Olympic Team. Kariya played alongside Mario Lemieux at Salt Lake City, and helped power the Canadians to the gold medal with three goals and an assist.

Following a sub-par 2001-02 regular season in Anaheim, Kariya and the Ducks got back on the right track. Kariya finished the regular season with 81 points on the strength of 25 goals and 56 assists while the Ducks qualified for the post season for the first time since 1998-99. They made it all the wasy to the Stanley Cup Final where they lost to New Jersey Devils in a hard-fought seven game series.

After nine seasons in Anaheim, the former Hobey Baker winner was acquired by the Colorado Avalanche in the summer of 2003. Upon his arrival with the Avs, Kariya went on to play a mere 51 games with the club due to injury and subsequently signed as a free agent with the Nashville Predators in the summer of 2005.

The 05-06 regular season went very well for Paul and the Predators. He set a team high for most points in a season. Averaged more than a point a game. Played in every game. Scoring many shootout winning goals. Brought instant credibility the organization. They did however bow out of the playoffs to San Jose in 5 Games.

NHL Totals 739 342 448 790 +41 Playoff Totals 41 16 21 37 -3


Last edited by Leaf Lander: 05-02-2006 at 12:17 AM.
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04-22-2006, 04:47 PM
  #29
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Doug Gilmour, C

Quote:
He was the best player, pound for pound his october playing weight was 170 when the season started but it would get dangerously close to 160 by the time april rolled around. Dougie epitomizes how a small man can play at such a high level in the NHL. Dougie had a ferocity about him that belies his size. He played on the edge of rules, with a little late push here, a sneaky lilttle cuff there. On his best night Gilmour could get into a emotional zone that lifted him into a class with the all time NHL elite. You would see it in his first shift, if he theres an extra push of energy in his stride and if there was then you knew he would be a pain all night long and a force to be delat with. He was one fo the few who was in the top five players in the league offensively and defensivley. Dougie needed to be hungry to thrive. He combined great vision and shifty skating to drive opponents nuts. Primarily a playmaker he needed wingers like Andreychuck or Wendel Clark to feed the puck too. When he wasn't attacking the opponents goal he was defending his own with relentless checking. He didn't just score big goals he scared the top players on every team. He was the heart and soul of Canadas team and became a national star and a beloved hockey legend.

Gilmour was selected by St. Louis in the seventh round, 134th overall..

Still, Gilmour's size worried management in St. Louis so Gilmour found himself near the bottom of the team's depth chart at center, but a depleted roster allowed him to play on the fourth line as a defensive specialist and he returned to his checking ways. The Blues' captain, Brian Sutter, nicknamed Gilmour "Killer" for his intensity.

Despite playing in a checking role he did score 50 points a yr during his first 3 seasons. Then during the 1986 playoffs he began to play a more open game notching 21 points in 19 games when the Blues came within a game of advancing to the Stanley Cup finals. The next season, 1986-87, he finished the regular schedule with a career-high 42 goals and 105 points and was selected to play for Team Canada in the Canada Cup. He scored two important goals in the series against the Soviet Union and was named the tournament's most valuable player.

After another solid season in St. Louis, Gilmour was traded to the Calgary Flames at the beginning of the 1988-89 campaign. In Calgary, Gilmour continued his strong play in the playoffs, adding 22 points in 22 games as the Flames won the Stanley Cup in 1989. Gilmour scored the series-winning goal in game six of the finals against Montreal. Halfway through the 1991-92 season, Gilmour became increasingly disenchanted with his pay from the Flames and an arbitrator's decision that saw his salary increase less than he expected. He decided to leave the team, but only a few hours later he was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs in a blockbuster deal involving 10 players, the largest trade in league history.

(Traded to Tor by Cal - Jamie Macoun, Ric Nattress, Rick Wamsley Kent Manderville for Gary Leeman, Alex Godynyuk, Jeff Reese, Michel Petit & Craig Berube, Jan 2, 1992. )

Gilmour played his best hockey with the Leafs. He was a pesky defensive forward who seemed fearless in his checking. Offensively, he was the focal point of an improving team, setting a franchise record with 127 points in his first full season with Toronto in 1992-93. He became only the second Leaf after Darryl Sittler to register over a hundred points in a season and also led the team to within a game of the Stanley Cup finals, placing second in playoff scoring and leading the league with 25 assists. Gilmour placed second to Mario Lemieux in the race for the Hart Trophy as the league's most valuable player and won the Selke Trophy as the top defensive forward, a remarkable achievement for a player with such offensive numbers.

Gilmour had 111 points the next season, earning his 2nd consecutive spot in the All-Star Game. He once again led the Leafs to the semifinals in the playoffs. Gilmour was named the team captain in 1994-95 before the lockout shortened season and remained a popular player in Toronto even as the team began to struggle. When the Leafs went into rebuilding mode midway through the 1996-97 season, Gilmour was sent to the New Jersey.

He spent one full season with the defense oriented Devils and was signed as a free agent by the Chicago Blackhawks in the summer of 1998. In the spring of 2000, he was traded to the Buffalo Sabres. Where his productivity lacked and he contemplated retirement. Then signed on as a free agent with the Montreal Canadiens in October 2001, and went on to play parts of two seasons with the Habs before he was dealt back to Toronto at the trading deadline in 2003.

In his first game back with the Leafs, Gilmour injured his knee and his season and career came to an abrupt end.

Over the course of his distinguished playing career, Gilmour registered 1414 points on the strength of 450 goals and 964 assists.

Career Highlights

This will describe Dougie scoring his highlight goal from behind the net on curtis joseph and the Blue in the 93 playoffs.

May 2, 93 Leafs vs blues at the Gardens. 2nd OT tied 1-1 Dougie had played 41 minutes already that night.

"I was tired I wanted to nap. I was never so tired in my entire life" says doug.

Despite his weariness he had enough fuel left in his fuselage to fake to his left, pivot 360 and slide the puck behind a thoroughly mesmirized curtis jospeh. "I've scored good goals and important goals but none were ever as good as that. I was back there for so long. I would go one way and they would follow me, then I would go the other way and they all continued to follow.I felt like I was running out of time not to mentioned I was tired" says Gilmour while describing the goal.

Gilmour now writes a weekly hockey column for the Toronto Sun and can be seen at Leaf functions. Now well into retirement whenever he is on the ice at the ACC you can see the intensity in the man. Part of him still yearns to wear the blue and white on the ice one more time. Unfortunatley for us leaf fans the all the only place we will see dougie play is maybe old timers game or on our old vcr players

NHL Totals 1474 450 964 1414 1301

Playoff Totals 182 60 128 188 235

Frank J. Selke Trophy (1993) Played in NHL All-Star Game (1993, 1994)

Dougie fits every criterion for a league MVP - Mark Howe

Quotes

Gilmour is a throw back. Doug is one of the best little men I have ever seen play the game. - Max McNab

Gilmour is the best player in the league at both ends.- Bob Berry

Doug plays well in all game situations .He is tops at even strength, he works the powerplay and he kills penatlies. He deserves the money he is getting. - Ray Bourque

Doug reminds me of dave keon. He is a tireless skater who gives it his all and never gets weary -Scotty Bowman

He was a becon of darkness, a combination of Gordie Howe and Jean Beliveau - taking over the game, killing penatlies,scoring the works. And we won! - Harry Ornest

He does everything well. He wins faceoffs, he's unselfish, he takes a hit to make a play, he has fantastic vision to go with a great pair of hands. On top of that he is tough- Adam Oates

He is a vicous little ba$%trd- a mean little tough guy. Didnt he break Tomas Sandstroms arm? - Don Cherry

I want to kiss Dougie - Don Cherry

Got Milk ? - Doug Gilmour

credits :history of hockey and a inside hockey interview from 1993

Mike Gartner, RW

Quote:
Inducted 2001. Born 29 October 1959 Ottawa, Ontario. Died:_____ Played 19 NHL seasons from 1979 to 1998

I have a God-given ability to skate. I haven't really worked on my legs at all during my career.

Always one of the fastest skaters in the NHL, Michael Alfred Gartner used his blazing speed and a hard, accurate shot to become one of the most consistent scorer's in league history, most of his 19 seasons of which were spent outside hockey's limelight. He would use the jets in his skates and his smarts and deesire to go to the net using his speed and he would never turn back. He was excellant at killing penalties. He was a constant threat short handed and mike would take the body when needed. He knew when to hit or to interfere and when to step it up to change the tempo of the game.

Mike learned to skate during his minor hockey years with the Mississauga Reps organization, he came under the tutelage of coaches who understood the value of learning the basics, and it was here that Mike developed his skating.

Gartner joined the Tier II, Junior 'A' Young Nationals squad. It was with the Nats that he realized his potential for making a living out of the sport he loved. After a that Gartner was on to Niagara Falls Flyers in the OHA. Despite playing for a losing club, Gartner recorded 74 goals and 165 points in both seasons and was named to the First All-Star Team. He was also chosen to represent Canada at the 1978 World Junior championships, scoring six points during a bronze medal finish.

Ready to turn pro, but at 18 underage for the NHL, Gartner was wooed by the WHA's Cincinnati Stingers. He signed a four-year contract, beginning with the 1978-79 season. Proving the critics wrong, the speedy right-winger recorded 52 points and was runner-up to Wayne Gretzky for Rookie-of-the-Year honours. Following the season's conclusion, the WHA and NHL merged and Gartner's ultimate dream became reality.

Gartner was drafted 4th overall during the 1979 Entry Draft by the Washington Capitals. He made an instant impact on his new club, leading the team in both goals (36) and points (68). Over the next eight seasons, Gartner never scored fewer than 35 goals, hitting the magical 50-goal mark during the 1984-85 season. He led the Capitals in scoring on four occasions, and prior to his trade to Minnesota in 1989 he had tied or set 12 team records including career goals (397) and points (789), all of which he accomplished on a team that missed the playoffs three times and bowed out in the first round three other times.

The poor playoff performances by the Capitals enabled Gartner to become an experienced member of Canada's National Team. Always answering the call when asked, Gartner suited up for the 1981, 1982, 1983 and 1993 World Championship squads. Additionally, he was named to the Canada Cup clubs in 1984 and 1987, narrowly missing a third tournament as the final cut in 1981. Combined with his World Junior bronze medal, Gartner won two gold and three bronze medals in international competition, scoring a total of 19 goals and 29 points.

After two short half-season stints with the North Stars, Gartner was traded to the New York Rangers in March 1990 where over the next three seasons he continued his goal scoring consistency with totals of 49, 40 and 45. He had now recorded 30-or-more goals in 14 consecutive seasons, a new NHL mark. During his stint in the Big Apple, Gartner became just the 16th player to reach the 500-goal mark, 6th to reach 600 goals and 33rd player to hit the 1,000-point milestone.

Prior to the 1994 trade deadline, Gartner was dealt to his boyhood home, Toronto. Continuing his record-setting streak with a 34-goal season, he was again disappointed as the Maple Leafs were ousted in the Stanley Cup semi-finals. Playing two more seasons for the Maple Leafs, Gartner was named as a Commissioner's Selection to the 1996 All-Star Game team. This marked his seventh and final appearance, which included an MVP performance of four goals and an assist in 1993. It was during the annual Skill's Competition, however, that he excelled. Gartner captured the "Fastest Skater Competition" each of the three years he entered, including 1996, at age 36. During the 1985-86 season, Gartner once said, "I have a God-given ability to skate. I haven't really worked on my legs at all during my career." He continued to prove his ability until his retirement in 1998.

During the 1996 off-season, Gartner was dealt to the Phoenix Coyotes where he finished his career two seasons later. In 1997-98, he became just the fifth player to reach the 700-goal plateau, a remarkable feat for perhaps the most consistent and unnoticed scorer the game has ever seen. Along with his consecutive 30-or-more goal seasons record of 15 straight years (a streak broken only by the labour troubles in 1994-95), Gartner also holds the NHL record for most 30-or-more goal seasons in a career with 17. He finished second all-time in goals for a right-winger and 5th overall (708), 5th all-time in assists by a right-winger (627), 4th all-time in points by a right-winger (1,335) and 7th on the all-time games played list (1,335).

Gartner was respected on ice and off. A devoted Christian, he spent countless hours at youth hockey camps and prepared himself for life after hockey, serving as a key member of the National Hockey League Players' Association Negotiating Committee during both labour disputes in the 1990's and as NHLPA President during the latter part of the decade. Following his retirement on August 26, 1998, he decided to spend his time in the Toronto area, coaching and working with the NHLPA's Goals & Dreams Foundation, a testament to his abilities as a communicator and educator in both hockey and life.


NHL Totals 1432 708 627 1335 1159 PlayOff Totals 122 43 50 93 125

OHA First All-Star Team (1978)

Darryl Sittler. C

Played with alot of competitiveness was highly skilled skilled centerman

there is nothing on him online

work in progress


Last edited by Leaf Lander: 04-25-2006 at 09:56 AM.
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04-22-2006, 04:59 PM
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Alex Delvecchio

(from legends of Hockey)

One of the most talented and classiest stars ever to play in the NHL, Alex "Fats" Delvecchio spent more than two decades with the Detroit Red Wings. He was a superior playmaker and team leader and one of the game's true gentlemen. When he retired in 1973, he trailed only long-time teammate Gordie Howe in games played, assists and total points. His career extended from Detroit's glory years of the early 1950s to their dismal 1970s.

As an amateur, Delvecchio starred in his home town of Fort William in northwestern Ontario before heading south to play for the Oshawa Generals under the tutelage of former Red Wings great Larry Aurie. In 1950-51, he led the OHA with 72 assists and had a one-game trial with Detroit. After starting the 1951-52 schedule with the Indianapolis Capitals of the AHL, he joined the Red Wings for good and began by playing on the third line with Metro Prystai and Johnny Wilson.

Delvecchio impressed as a rookie by helping Detroit win the Stanley Cup in 1952. In 1952-53, he replaced Sid Abel on the Production Line between Gordie Howe and Ted Lindsay and was named to the NHL Second All-Star Team.

The powerhouse Wings won the Stanley Cup in 1954 and 1955. In the second of these two triumphs, Delvecchio starred with seven goals and eight assists. A serious ankle injury forced him to sit out 22 games in 1956-57, but over the balance of his career, he missed only 21 contests in becoming one of the most durable stars in hockey history. He was also a versatile forward, earning All-Star selection at both center and left wing, and followed Dit Clapper and Sid Abel as only the third player in NHL history to be so honored at two positions.

In 1959 he won his first of three Lady Byng trophies. Throughout the 1960s, he was a consistent 20-goal scorer and solid playoff performer. A popular player in the dressing room, Delvecchio was given the affectionate nickname "Fats" as a tribute to his round face. More important, the esteem in which his peers held him led to his choice as team captain in 1962, a position he held until he retired. In 1966 he helped the Red Wings reach the finals with a playoff-leading 11 assists. Delvecchio was presented the Lady Byng Trophy again in 1966 and 1969.

Following the acquistion of Frank "Big M" Mahovlich from Toronto on March 3, 1968, Delvecchio enjoyed a short period where he formed a lethal forward line with the Big M and Gordie Howe. In 1968-69, the trio scored 118 goals to break the NHL standard set by the Habs' Punch Line of Toe Blake, Elmer Lach and Maurice Richard in the 1940s. Their success didn't last long, however, as Mahovlich was traded to Montreal in January 1971.

In the latter stages of his career, Delvecchio shared a host of milestones with long-time colleague Gordie Howe. On October 30, 1970, Fats stole the puck from Bruins phenomenon Bobby Orr to score his 400th goal. Later in the same game, Howe registered his 1,000th assist on Delvecchio's second goal of the night. Delvecchio also set up Mr. Hockey's 700th goal, while another Howe goal marked Delvecchio's 1,000th NHL point.

By the early 1970s, the Red Wings were in decline and Delvecchio was among the oldest players in the league. He remained one of the clubs few bright spots courtesy of his fluid skating style and quickness while handling or shooting the puck. In June 1970, Delvecchio's renamed home town of Thunder Bay held a day in his honor that attracted 30,000 admirers.

Early in the 1973-74 season, Delvecchio retired after spending parts of 24 seasons in the NHL. His career totals of 456 goals and 1,281 points carved him a permanent place in hockey history. Later that year, his service to one of the oldest U.S.-based franchises was acknowledged when he was awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy. Following teammate Gordie Howe, Delvecchio was only the second player in league history to play more than 20 seasons with the same team. His old linemate tried to convince him to jump to Houston of the WHA, but Delvecchio decided to stay in the NHL.

On retiring, Delvecchio remained in the Red Wings fold as head coach, a posting that took in parts of four seasons from 1973 to 1977. When he replaced harsh disciplinarian Ted Garvin in November 1973, Fats used the same savvy that served him as a player to win over his team

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04-22-2006, 05:11 PM
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Babe Pratt
(From Legends of hockey)

Walter "Babe" Pratt was a funny and outgoing man off the ice, keen on jokes and always good for a laugh, but he was considerably tougher with his hockey equipment on. Over a long career in leagues across North America, he proved consistently that the best defense is often a good offense. He was a defenseman who kept the puck deep in the other team's zone, sometimes deep in their net, and goalies on his squads could be sure their goals-against averages would drop when he was at his best. His leadership and ability are backed up by his remarkable winning record, from the National Hockey League to junior, as his teams won 15 championships over his 26 years in the game.

Pratt was born in Stony Mountain, Manitoba, in 1916. He played minor hockey in Winnipeg, much of it with the Atlantic Avenue Rink. He won the Winnipeg Playground Championship in the under-12 division with the club as a 10-year-old. Pratt's love after hockey was baseball and he was a promising young player. He was nicknamed "Babe," after Babe Ruth.

The next season he won the Manitoba juvenile title with Elmwood and led the league again in scoring. In 1933 he played for five teams in his area - high school, church league, juvenile, a senior league squad and the commercial league. Amazingly, every team won a championship. Later that year he made the move to the Kenora Thistles as a 17-year-old to play junior. Again he led the league in scoring, and the team easily won the Manitoba junior title. In his second year in junior he had 46 points in 20 games, tops in the league, and brought the Thistles to within a game of the final of the Memorial Cup, when they lost to the Winnipeg Monarchs.

He turned professional in 1935, having been signed by the New York Rangers. Ranger scout Al Ritchie called Pratt the best prospect he had ever seen. Pratt justified Ritchie's confidence with his play for the Rangers' farm team, the Philadelphia Ramblers, and midway through his first season with the Ramblers he was called up by the Rangers. In his rookie year, he had some veteran defenders to watch and play with, including Ching Johnson, Art Coulter and Ott Heller. In 1939-40, Pratt teamed with Heller to form the league's best defense pairing. In 48 games, they allowed only 17 goals and their play was instrumental in the Rangers' Stanley Cup win that season. Pratt had 28 points in 1941-42 as the Rangers won the regular-season championship.

Midway through the 1942-43 season, Pratt was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs for Hank Goldup and Red Garrett. Pratt had his best seasons with the Maple Leafs. In 1943-44, he led all defensemen with 57 points in 50 games - the best total ever by a defender and a mark that would stay in the books for 21 seasons. When Pierre Pilote broke the record with 59 points, he had played in 20 more games than Pratt. In 1944 Pratt was awarded the Hart Trophy as the league's most valuable player, an award rarely given to defensemen, and was placed on the league's First All-Star Team. He was a Second Team All-Star the next season, when the Maple Leafs won the Stanley Cup and he scored the winning goal.
Pratt continued to play hockey for six more years, many of them in the Pacific Coast Hockey League, after being traded to Boston in 1946-47 and then being demoted to the minors. Twice he was the league's most valuable player. He was a high-scoring defender with the two-time league champion New Westminster Royals, a team in his adopted province of British Columbia, and he later coached the club when he retired from play in 1952.

He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1966, the year before his son, Tracy, entered the National Hockey League for his first of 10 seasons in the league.

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04-26-2006, 07:10 PM
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Darryl Sittler, C

Quote:
Darryl was a choppy skater which seemed to make him quick around the net and gave him that extra burst of speed when he needed it. He had a unique skating style. Darryls game was composed of a masterful combination between skill and toughness. He was strong on the puck and had a deceptivley hard shot and was a forrunner of a power forward style of play, strong, good dish, Darryl was a hard-nosed player, completely accountable he played in all the tough area's of the ice and was willing to drop 'em. fought only a few times a year but was rarely on the losing end. He had superior instincts and was capable of unpredictable spurts of offensive greatness.tough, skilled, fast, good puck distributor. A very good player simular to Joe Sakic His style has been enherited though adapated by Gilmour Yzerman Crosby Sakic and Inginla

The game was more nasty back in the 70's an era of bradway bullies set the tone. Darryl was able to dodge sticks elbows and bone crushing hits on the ice and use his brains and wits to out last the bandits who ran MLG off the ice.
Darryl's hero was Jean Belliveau and that is who he tried to model his game after. He had a physical element. He was a terrific leader.. He seemed to have that sense that the greats did to get to the right places at the right tim

Darryl was A Quintiessential leaf.

Sittler's ties to the NHL started early. His first good pair of hockey skates belonged to former neighbour Rod Seiling, who was starring with the New York Rangers. By fifteen, Darryl was being noticed, and during the midget draft in 1967, was selected third overall by the Junior A London Nationals, coached by Leaf legend Turk Broda.

He was drafted by the Leafs 8th overall in the 1970 Entry Draft." Unlike today's top fifty or sixty picks, very few of the better players eligible for selection attended the draft session," Darryl stated. Toronto had the eighth pick, and chose the London Knights centre. "I was hard at work building swimming pools in London," laughs Darryl, remembering his draft day. "I'd been a Maple Leaf about five or six hours before I found out. I heard the news on the radio on the way home from my summer job that evening."

Jim Gregory, the Leafs' general manager, had plans for Darryl, but they weren't at centre ice. "We felt we were in good shape at centre then with Ullman,Keon,Walton and Harrison. But we did need help on the left side," he told the Toronto Star. "Just about everybody in the organization had a chance to scout Sittler and they all rated him very high."

Johnny McLellan (Leaf coach) told me he'd give me a chance to make the team as a Left Winger, Sittler was determined to make it. "As I watched Keon zip up and down the ice, I wondered if I'd ever get close to Keon's speed and skills," Sittler mused in a Toronto Sun article. Leaf management tipped there hat that they had designs on the young forward when they gave him #27 which was the number Frank Mahovlich had worn. "I figured management was trying to send me a message." sittler said.

Sittler had worn 9 as a junior.His idols were centres - Norm Ullman and Jean Beliveau. Mahovlich was a left winger. But I was well aware what he'd done as a Leaf. He'd been one of their greatest players so it gave me a really good feeling when I was handed his number."

He saw limited action in his first pro season in 1970-71 because he
broke his wrist and missed ten weeks of action, but was back for the playoffs. He scored a modest 10 goals and collected 18 points in an abbreviated rookie season.


Because of the injury he had an unremarkable sophomore year scoring just 32 points.When he returned to training camp the following year, Darryl was determined to do better. However he neeeded strength and conditioning to his injured wrist because it was giving him trouble. He couldn't shoot hard enough and wasn't releasing the puck quickly enough. He strengthened his wrist by squeezing springs and played with a brace on my wrist."

In 1972-73, he began to establish himself as an offensive star, finishing with 77 points - a total he would better in all but three of his subsequent 12 seasons in the NHL.

In 1973-74 the leafs signed him to a lucarative 5 yr deal. Things were looking up for the leafs under coach Red Kelly. Sittler and his young team mates Borje Salming, Inge Hammarstrom, Lanny McDonald and Ian Turnbull would all be part of a memorable 1970's leafs team.

The following seasons illustrated Darryl's consistency - 36 goals and 80 points in 1974-75, 41 goals and 100 points in '75-76 and 38 goals and 90 points in '76-77

Darryl Sittler is arguably the most popular player in the history of the Toronto Maple Leafs. No other player performed so well for so long amidst the cartoonish buffoonery of Leafs owner Harold Ballard.
The Leafs were in a rebuilding phase early in his career and many veterans either retired or were traded.September 1975 the 24-year-old Sittler took over the captain's duties, becoming the second-youngest captain in Leafs history after Teeder Kennedy.

"We wanted Sittler as the captain because he wasn't afraid to speak up for his teammates, he was a man respected by both players and management," stated Jim Gregory


Sittler had an incredible year in 1975-76. On February 7, 1976, he produced the greatest offensive game in the history of the National Hockey League, guaranteeing his place in the record books even after Wayne Gretzky had come and gone. Toronto was hosting the Boston Bruins, a team on a seven-game winning streak. The Bruins had recently reacquired Gerry Cheevers, but coach Don Cherry wanted to give the goalie a rest before his upcoming Boston homecoming and started rookie netminder instead. Poor Dave Reece, who was in goal for the Bruins that night, would never play another NHL game
The Leafs beat up the Bruins 11-4, but Sittler was the big story. He had two assists in the first period, three goals and two assists in the second and another hat trick in the third. The total of six goals and four assists set a league record for points in one game that had previously been held by Maurice "Rocket" Richard with eight.

The big night helped Sittler become the first Leaf to reach the 100 mark in scoring in a season, collecting 41 goals and 59 assists. But he wasn't finished.

Much has been made about the 'Pyramid Power' that Red Kelly used to help motivate his team. The Leafs were under terrific pressure to beat the Flyers. Owner Harold Ballard predicted that the Leafs would whip the Flyers in five games. Kelly, whose sons had visited Egypt and spoke passionately about the supernatural powers of the pyramid, gave their father an idea. He placed pyramids under the Leaf bench and in the dressing room. "Red put a pyramid in the dressing room. I put my sticks underneath it hoping it might help." It seemed to help, but so did the assistance of something else - "I have a tie I wear when it's a crucial game," admitted Sittler. "I wore it one night when I got three goals. I had it on the time I had the ten points against Boston. I felt this game was so crucial, I went to the cleaners to pick up the tie specially." Whether it was pyramids or lucky ties, Darryl had another outstanding game. "I don't really know how to describe how I feel. I guess I feel lucky. I just don't know why it happened

During the playoffs in April against the Philadelphia Flyers, Sittler scored five goals in one game, tying the playoff record.

In September, during the Canada Cup in Montreal, Sittler would make headlines again with his scoring ways. This time it wasn't the quantity but the quality and the timeliness that made the impression. In overtime of the second game of the best-of-three finals versus Czechoslovakia, Sittler held onto the puck on a partial breakaway until Czech goalie Vladimir Dzurilla committed himself and an opening presented itself. The goal secured the championship and made Sittler an overnight hero in Canada. "It was an experience I'll never forget. Just being on the team was fantastic" said sittler.

Most Memorable Goal

In his autobiography, Sittler explained the integral role of assistant coach Don Cherry's in Darryl's landmark goal on September 15, 1976. With the score tied at four after regulation time, Cherry addressed Team Canada "'I've been upstairs watching this guy, Dzurilla, for three games,' he began. 'He likes to come out real fast to cut down the angle on any rush. After you go in over the blueline, fake a slapper. If you see him come out of his net, draw it back in and go wide and deeper. He'll leave you with most of the net empty.'" During overtime, Sittler carried the puck down the left wing, faked a shot at netminder Vladimir Dzurilla, who had come out fifteen feet to cut down the angle, then skated past the goalie and deposited the puck into the open net at 11:33 of overtime to give Team Canada a sweep in the best of three final over Czechoslovakia to claim the first Canada Cup title. "After I scored the goal, the whole team surrounded me out on the ice and we went into a group hug with Lanny (McDonald) leading the world in oxygen-threatening squeezes and hollering," wrote Darryl in 'Sittler.' The goal scoring hero earned a spot as the tournament's All-Star left winger, as well.

In 1977-78, Sittler registered 117 points and was selected to the league's Second All-Star Team. The Leafs had their best playoff showing in years, making it to the semi-finals. But things began to fall apart, for the franchise and for its captain, in 1979-80 when cantankerous owner Harold Ballard replaced much of his management, bringing in Punch Imlach to run the team.

On July 4, 1979, Harold Ballard shocked the hockey world by re-hiring Punch Imlach to run the Maple Leafs. One of his first moves was to prevent Darryl from participating in a 'Hockey Night in Canada' intermission feature called 'Showdown.' Both Sittler and Leaf goaltender Mike Palmateer had been selected to participate in the skills competition. In his first meeting with the new GM, Sittler quotes Imlach as saying, "I'm the GM. You don't decide to go to 'Showdown,' I decide, and I don't want you to go." Darryl went to the show's taping and, in spite of a last ditch effort by the Leafs to prevent the two stars from taking part, did so wearing generic sweaters. But it was the first of a series of confrontations between Imlach and Sittler. Eventually, to assert his power, the Leafs' general manager traded away a number of players close to Darryl, who happened to have a no-trade clause in his own contract. First to go was Pat Boutette, a former teammate with the London Nationals. Then, it was Lanny McDonald, Sittler's closest friend on the Leafs. "The shock was so palpable, some of the guys fell back or slumped in their seats as if they'd been struck physically," Sittler recalled in his autobiography. Darryl questioned management and whether he wanted to continue as the team's on-ice leader. 'When I was made captain, it was the happiest day of my life,' Sittler wrote in a letter announcing his resignation as captain of the Toronto Maple Leafs. "In a very emotional speech to the players, I explained what I was doing, and why I was doing it. Imlach was trying to break down this whole team, didn't want me as captain and wouldn't let me function as one. All of the outside controversy had gotten too big; all I wanted to do as play hockey."

Further changes took place that impacted on the team and on Sittler personally. Dave Hutchison was traded - he, too, a former teammate of Darryl's in London. Then, another linemate and friend, Tiger Williams, was sent to the Canucks. Darryl remembers, "I had my mind made up that I wanted to stay in Toronto. I was going to outlast this guy (Imlach). I didn't deserve any of this, I couldn't understand why it was happening to me, but I could overcome it."

Sittler was represented by Alan Eagleson, a lawyer and agent who never saw eye to eye with Ballard or Imlach. Relations were strained to the point that Sittler took a pair of scissors to the "C" on his sweater before a game in late 1979 to protest, among other things, the trade of Lanny McDonald to the Colorado Rockies. Ballard then threatened to lock Sittler out before the beginning of the next season. The two men resolved some of their differences and Sittler returned as captain, but it was a tenuous reconciliation. Midway through the 1981-82 season, Sittler went AWOL and demanded a trade. He was depressed and worn out from his battles with management in Toronto.


On January 20, 1982, Gerry McNamara, who had replaced Imlach as the team's general manager, called Sittler and informed him that he had been traded to the Philadelphia Flyers, a one-time nemesis but a team that nonetheless had a great deal of respect for Sittler.

After recovering from the nasty divorce with the Leafs, Sittler had a great season in 1982-83, netting 83 points and a spot in the All-Star Game.On the day he was to be named captain of the Flyers Draryl was shocked when Philadelphia traded him to the Detroit Red Wings before the 1984-85 season.

Unsure if he wanted to continue and move his family to yet another city, Sittler refused to report for five days. He did play one yr with Detroit, though at times he struggled to find a place in the lineup.
He retired after the season. Sittler was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1989. Two years later he returned to the Toronto Maple Leafs, this time working in the club's management in marketing and public relations.

NHL Totals 1096 Games 484 goals, 637 assists 1,121 points.

Playoff Totals 76 29 45 74 137

Second All-Star Team Centre (1978)


Career Notes:

Although just an hour down the highway from Toronto, Darryl was not a Leaf fan. "I grew up as the only Montreal Canadiens fan in a family of 10 and all were Leafs fans."-autobiography, 'Sittler.'

Once, while playing cribbage with Jacques Plante and Errol Thompson during a flight, Darryl came up with a perfect hand. "That's a one-in-a-million thing, something that happens to a very, very few cribbage players, even those who play the game every day all their lives," laughed Sittler in an interview with The Hockey News


In 1989, Herbie Lewis, Vladislav Tretiak, Alan Eagleson and Darryl Sittler were inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, capping outstanding NHL careers. Darryl reflected in Mike Ulmer's book, 'Captains,' "The reality of it is, I was fortunate to play fifteen years, making a living at something I really loved doing. To end up in the Hall of Fame, to score the winning goal at the Canada Cup and all those other things that happened, even though we didn't win the Cup, I appreciated that."

Sittlers #27 was Honoured by the Leafs February 8, 2003. In 1993, the Leafs began a policy of "Honoured Numbers" for their greatest stars:

Sittler #27 Turk Broda and Johnny Bower (1), King Clancy and Tim Horton (7), Charlie Conacher and Ted Kennedy (9), Syl Apps and George Armstrong (10) and of course, Frank Mahovlich (27), in the pantheon of the Leafs greats. Only two numbers, Bill Barilko's No. 5 and the No. 6 worn by Ace Bailey, loaned to Ron Ellis and then re-enshrined, are out of permanent circulation. Sittler knew most of the players who's numbers hang from the rafters of the ACC.

- Served as team captain from 1975 until Dec. 29, 1979, when he removed the C from his sweater to protest the trade of Lanny McDonald. Accepted the captaincy again at the start of the 1980-81 season.
- On Feb. 7, 1976, set an NHL record with a 10-point game -- six goals and four assists.
- On April 22, 1976, scored five goals in one playoff game.
- In September 1976, scored the winning goal in overtime in the final game against Czechoslovakia to give Canada the first Canada Cup championship.
- In 1977-78, established career highs with 45 goals and 72 assists and led the Leafs to the Stanley Cup semi-finals.
- In 1989, elected to Hockey Hall of Fame

He was also one tough dude. In one of the best fights I ever saw, Sittler versus Gary Howatt (the Toy Tiger) of the New York Islanders. They dropped the gloves at centre ice at Maple Leaf Gardens and just pounded each other for about 3 minutes (at one stage they were just alternating punches to the head back and forth), then after fatigue they both dropped to there knees at the same time and while on there knees continued to slug it out for another 2 minutes. They both quit at the same time. They recieved a standing ovation. Seemed like they both landed about 50 punches each.
Sittler was the real deal, would have been a first line centre on any team in the NHL to-day Leaf Fan -nick Northern Dancer

- Remember Darryl played in a different era, and played both ways.
The biggest disappointment as a Darryl fan was that he didn't get the Lou Marsh award in 1976. Lafleur got it, I believe.Sitt had his 10 point night, ended up 3rd in league scoring, I believe he had his 5 goal playoff game against Philly that year, scored the Canada Cup winning goal in the first true world cup of hockey, was voted to the tourney all star team..........should have been a tap in - he got screwed- Big Phil

He had a career high of 45 goals and 117 points in '77-78. And despite not winning a Cup he was still a pretty good playoff performer. he did everything very good. He could skate, shoot, pass and if he had to drop the gloves he wasnt a bad fighter either. Sittler was once a second team all-star in 1978 when he was third in scoring.- Leaf Fan

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05-06-2006, 09:30 PM
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Ulf Nilsson

In 1974 Nilsson joined the WHA's Winnipeg Jets, where he formed the Hot Line with the legendary Bobby Hull and fellow Swede Anders Hedberg The very fact that such a unique international trio existed deserves mention in any hockey encyclopedia.

This line introduced the European style to North American Hockey where the forwards didnít stick to their lanes but improvised according to the situation. Glen Sather based the successful Oiler system of the early 80ís on the this style.

Part of the first major wave of Europeans to star in North American hockey, he was a major star in the WHA from 1974 to 1978. He scored at least 114 points in each of his four seasons in the upstart league, finishing third or fourth among overall scorers every time. He led the WHA with 85 assists in 1976-77, and tied Marc Tardif for the lead the next season with 89. He played a starring role as the Jets won Avco Cup titles in 1976 and 1978. In the 1976 playoffs, he scored 26 points in just 13 games and was voted the playoff MVP. He was a WHA first team all star in 1976 & 1978 and was on the second team in 1977.

At the 1976 Canada Cup, he played exceptionally well for Tre Kronor and in a game against the USSR scored the decisive goal against Vladislav Tretiak.

The most memorable game for Nilsson was the one between the Winnipeg Jets and the USSR in 1978 in Winnipeg, which the Canadian team won 5-3. In that game, Hull scored three goals, Nilsson scored two, and the Nilsson-Hull-Hedberg trio won their own game against one of the world's best lineups, the Mikhailov-Petrov-Kharlamov trio.

In the summer of 1978, Nilsson and Hedberg signed with the NHL's New York Rangers for $2.4 million, further weakening the struggling WHA which would cease operations after just one more season. Nilsson's NHL career was marred by injuries. He was limited to 160 games in his three full seasons with the Rangers, though he scored an impressive 163 points in that time. He scored 8 goals and 16 points in the 1980-81 playoffs as the Rangers advanced to the semi-finals before being eliminated by their cross-town rivals, the defending champion New York Islanders.

Quotes
Ulf Nilsson is the hub of the wheel that keeps the hot line rolling along. Ulf doesn't have the hardest shot. For that matter, he rarely shoots that much. He is persistent; he is dedicated to the cause and is doing more than was expected of him when he arrived from Sweden. Ulf has possession of the puck more often than any of his teammates. He makes the play happen. He sets up the plays more often than he scores them. When he skates, he does it meticulously, not with frantic leg motion or dramatic colour. (Jets Programme 1975)

Their exciting play will probably put them down in the hockey history books as the most exciting line in professional hockey in the 1970's. (Jets Programme 1975)

As Bobby Hull waited in the Madison Square Garden corridor for a Pro-Celebrity Hockey Challenge to begin, the Hall of Famer recalled a night when Ulf Nilsson was bruised from head to toe.
''He only got eight points that night,'' Hull said with a laugh. ''You couldn't intimidate him.''

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05-06-2006, 10:20 PM
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Anders Hedberg

Anders Hedberg

In 1969 the head coach of the Swedish national team invited a 17-year-old named Anders Hedberg to join the national team, but his studies prevented him from accepting. Hedberg made his first appearance in the national lineup the following year and immediately proved he was a player with great talent. He was even nicknamed "the New Tumba" after 1950s Swedish hockey star Sven "Tumba" Johansson. Hedberg played 100 official games for Sweden.

In Sweden, Anders Hedberg is the only player to be rewarded "Junior of the Year" twice

One of Hedberg's most memorable goals was the third one he scored against Vladislav Tretiak in the 1976 Canada Cup tournament. On a perfect pass from defenseman Borje Salming, Hedberg went one on one with the Soviet goalkeeper and tied the score 3-3.

By this time, he had already left Stockholm's Djurgarden and joined the Winnipeg Jets in the newly formed World Hockey Association. In what was perhaps the happiest time in his sports career, Hedberg played with teammate Ulf Nilsson on the same line as the legendary Canadian hockey player Bobby Hull a line that was then considered the best in the WHA. Hull often stated that he'd never had partners who had mastered the fine points of hockey as well as the two Swedes, Hedberg and Nilsson. Bobby Hull scored his 1,000th career goal while playing in the lineup with the two Scandinavians.

He was WHA rookie of the year in 1975 and was a first team all star in 1976 & 1977. He was a second team all star in 1975 & 1978. He was a a member of two Avco cup teams.

He beat "Rocket" Richards more than 30 years old goal record (50/50) when he scored 51 goals in 47 games 1976-77.

Anders passed the Superstar level (50 goals and 100 points) during all his Seasons in Winnipeg

On Jan. 5, 1978, the Jets took on the Russian national team in an exhibition game and won the contest 5-3. It marked the first time Russia had been beaten by a club team and the Jets top line of Hedberg, Ulf Nilsson and Bobby Hull combined for 10 points against the world powerhouse.

"Russia had been beating up on most NHL teams and we beat them," said Hedberg, noting he felt like he was representing Canada that night. "Our line played against their top line and outscored them 5-0. I didn't have a very good game but my linemates sure did. I didn't carry the line, but I was part of it.

After the demise of the WHA, Hedberg played seven seasons with the New York Rangers for a total of 465 games in which he scored 172 goals. In a ceremony during the 1997 World Championship in Finland, Anders Hedberg and Tumba Johansson were among those inducted into the European Hockey Hall of Fame.
He was rewarded "Bill Masterton Trophy" in 1985, he played in NHL All Star team twice and was twice "Most Valuable Player" in the Rangers.

Quotes:

"Canada played fair but their tactic was to neutralize me and Anders Hedberg, which they managed to do. (Salming, 1976)

Hull meshed with the European style of Anders Hedberg and Ulf Nilsson, a unit that would terrorize the WHA.
"It was magic, from the first time we stepped on the ice at St. James," Hull says.

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05-11-2006, 06:28 PM
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BILL MOSIENKO

Despite Mosienko's lack of hardware in the form of trophies, the name Bill Mosienko may be one of the most well known names of the 1940's and early 50ís because of one particular record that he has held since 1952. On March 23 of that year Bill Mosienko scored 3 goals in the span of 21 seconds, a record that still exists today, and given the style of play today, it is a record that perhaps could last for many years to come.

Bill "Mosie' Mosienko grew up in the north end of Winnipeg with nine brothers and four sisters. He turned pro with the Chicago Black Hawks at the age of 18 and was sent to the minors for seasoning. Mosienko split the next two seasons between the NHL and the minors before earning full-time duties with the Black Hawks in 1943.

Mosienko was known for his skating ability and was ranked as the fastest skater in the NHL. He earned that title by beating the fastest skaters from the other 5 teams in 1950 during a skating contest at the Montreal Forum. He was also ranked as the fastest skater by a poll of sportscaster in all 6 NHL cities.

Mosienko was teamed on a line with Clint Smith and Doug Bentley in 1943-44 and this threesome went on to set an NHL record of amassing 219 points. The record was broken by one point the following season by three fellows from Montreal named Blake, Lach, and Richard. Mosienko recorded four assists in the third period in a game against the Montreal Canadiens in 1945 and won the Lady Byng Trophy at season's end, in addition to a berth on the NHL Second All-Star Team.

He was teamed with Doug Bentley and Max Bentley to form the famous "Pony Line" in 1945-46 and was selected to the NHL Second All-Star Team for the second consecutive season. In all, he played in five league All-Star games during his 14-year NHL career.

Mosienko will always be remembered for his record three goals in 21 seconds scored against goalie Lorne Anderson of the New York Rangers on March 23, 1952. Linemate Gus Bodnar assisted on all three, and all of the goals were scored while the teams were at even strength.

Mosienko suited up for the Winnipeg Warriors of the WHL in 1955-56 and helped the team win the league championship. He was named to the WHL's All-Star Team in the 1957, '58, and '59 seasons and was named Manitoba's Athlete of the Year in 1957. He retired for good in 1959 but coached the Warriors the following year before turning his attention to Winnipeg Minor Hockey, the Manitoba Oldtimers, and the Hockey Players Foundation, as well as playing in annual golf tournaments.

In 1980, he was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame and to the Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame in 1985. In 1991 the City of Winnipeg re-named the Keewatin Arena as the Bill Mosienko Arena, and in 1965 he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.


ED LITZENBERGER

Ed Litzenberger is the only player in the history of the NHL to win the Calder Trophy after bring traded during his rookie season. Litzenberger came up through the Montreal Canadiens system and earned a regular spot with the team in 1954-55. If he had belonged to any other team, he would have made it a couple of years sooner. During his rookie year, he was dealt to Chicago midway through the season in an attempt to prop up the Black Hawks (who had been in danger of folding for several years). He wound up being named the top rookie after scoring 23 goals. Because of the trade, he also set what was then an NHL record for games played with 73 in a 70-game schedule.

Litzenberger slumped during his second full season but had 32 goals and 64 points to lead the Black Hawks and rank fifth in the NHL in scoring in 1956-57. Though Chicago missed the playoffs (for the tenth time in 11 years), Litzenberger was named to the Second All-Star Team at centre that season. He went on to lead the Black Hawks, and rank among the league leaders, in scoring again each of the next two years. Now playing right wing, he had 32 goals and 30 assists in 1957-58. Litzenberger established career highs with 33 goals, 44 assists and 77 points in 1958-59 and led the team into the playoffs. He was also named captain of the Black Hawks that year. He played on the Pappy Line with Tod Sloan & Ted Lindsay which was the top scoring line that year with 82 goals, 115 assists & 197 total points.. Litz played at the same time as several great right wings in the late 50ís and this is why he didnít have more all star selections. He was a contemporary of Howe, Bathgate, Geoffrion, and the Rocket.

In January of 1960, Litzenberger was badly injured in a car accident that claimed the life of his wife. He overcame the tragedy to return to the Black Hawks late in the season and in 1960-61 he helped Chicago win its first Stanley Cup title in 23 years. As team captain he accepted the Stanley cup on behalf of the team.

The Black Hawks then traded him to the Detroit Red Wings, He started strongly with the Wings and seemed to be regaining his old form playing on a line with Howe & Delvecchio.. However, for some reason he fell in to disfavour with Manager Jack Adams and he was allowed to go to the Toronto Maple Leafs on waivers. With the Maple Leafs, Litzenberger won the Stanley Cup again in 1962 and 1963. He was also a member of Toronto's Stanley Cup-winning team in 1963-64, though he spent most of that season with Rochester of the American Hockey League. Litzenberger spent the next two years with Toronto farm teams in Rochester and Victoria before retiring.

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Bill Coutu

Billy Coutu started his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens, in the first year of the NHL. In 1919, Coutu and four other teammates contracted influenza during the Stanley Cup. Joe Hall, manager George Kennedy, Jack McDonald, and Edouard "Newsy" Lalonde were hospitalized with influenza. Teammate Joe Hall died during Game 5, and the .

Coutu was traded to the Hamilton Tigers prior to the start of the 1921/22 season, along with Sprague Cleghorn, for Harry Mummery, Amos Arbour, and Cully Wilson, in the NHL's first multiple-player trade.
After the 1925/26 season, Coutu was traded to the Boston Bruins, in exchange for Amby Moran. During his first practice with the Bruins, Coutu body-slammed Eddie Shore, who had been strutting in front of Cleghorn and Coutu. Coutu's forehead hit Shore's skull, severing Shore's ear. Shore visited several doctors who wanted to amputate the ear, but finally found one who sewed it back on. After refusing anaesthetic, Shore used a mirror to watch the doctor sew on the ear. Shore claimed Coutu used his hockey stick to cut off the ear, and Coutu was fined $50. However, Shore later recanted and Coutu's money was refunded.

In Game 4 of the 1927 Stanley Cup, Coutu started a Stanley Cup brawl, apparently at the request of coach Art Ross. Coutu punched referee Jerry LaFlamme. As a result, Billy Coutu was the first player to be suspended from the NHL for life. On October 8, 1929, the suspension was lifted so that Coutu could play in the minor leagues. He never played in the NHL again.

Billy Coutu's last name is sometimes incorrectly spelled "Couture". He and his family pronounced their name "Koochee", which was somtimes confused with "Couture".

Plays: defence Height: 5 ft 11 in Weight: 190 lb Shoots: left

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Hap Day,Coach


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Clarence (Hap) Day, who led the Toronto Maple Leafs to six Stanley Cup championships as a player and a coach in the 1930's and 1940's

He coached leaf legends Gord Drillon, Syl Apps, Walter Broda ,Bob Davidson, Lorne Carr, David Schriner, Ted Kennedy, Bill Barilko. Jimmy Thomson, Harry Watson, Max Bentley, Gus Mortson and Sid Smith

In 1942, Hap Day inspired the Leafs to the greatest comeback in Stanley Cup history, Toronto beat Detroit in the Stanley Cup Final after losing the first three games.The Leafs won the series by winning four straight, the hardest way possible, what the the Leafs did, is something no team has ever been able to repeat.

As a coach he led the Maple Leafs to five Stanley Cup championships, the first in 1942 and the second in 1945. Under his leadership, the team was the first in the National Hockey League to take the Stanley Cup in three consecutive years, from 1947 to 1949.Hap went to university and studied pharmacy and on the Day that he resigned from the Maple Leafs in 1957, when he went into private business as a pharmacist.

He lived to be 88 yrs old passing on February 18, 1990.

546 Games 259 Wins 211 Losses 81 Ties
5 Stanley Cup Wins

- Coached 10 seasons and made the playoffs 9 times.

- Hap Day's .714 winning percentage is the best by a coach who has coached at least 15 games in the Stanley Cup Finals.



Regular Season
Year Games Wins Losses Ties
1940-1941 48 28 14 6 (2nd Place) Loss 1st rnd Boston 4 games to 3
1941-1942 48 27 18 3 (2nd Place)Stanley Cup 4 games to 3 Detroit
1942-1943 50 22 19 9 (3rd Place) Loss 1st rnd Detroit win s 4 games to 2
1943-1944 50 23 23 4 (3rd Place) Loss 1st rnd Montreal win 4 games to 1
1944-1945 50 24 22 4 (3rd Place) Stanley Cup 4 games to 3 over Detroit
1945-1946 50 19 24 7 (5th Place) Did not make playoffs
1946-1947 60 31 19 10(2ndPlace) Stanley Cup 4 games to 2 over Montreal
1947-1948 60 32 15 13 (1st Place) Stanley Cup 4 games to 0 over Detroit
1948-1949 60 22 25 13 (4th Place) Stanley Cup 4 games to 0 over Detroit
1949-1950 70 31 27 12 (3rd Place) Lost rnd 1 Red Wings win 4 games to 3


546 Games 259 Wins 211 Losses 81 Ties

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Darryl Sittler,C

Quote:
Darryl was a choppy skater which seemed to make him quick around the net and gave him that extra burst of speed when he needed it. He had a unique skating style. Darryls game was composed of a masterful combination between skill and toughness. He was strong on the puck and had a deceptivley hard shot and was a forrunner of a power forward style of play, strong, good dish, Darryl was a hard-nosed player, completely accountable he played in all the tough area's of the ice and was willing to drop 'em. fought only a few times a year but was rarely on the losing end. He had superior instincts and was capable of unpredictable spurts of offensive greatness.tough, skilled, fast, good puck distributor. A very good player who would be simular to Joe Sakic. His style has been enherited though adapated by Gilmour Yzerman Crosby Sakic and Inginla

The game was more nasty back in the 70's an era of bradway bullies set the tone. Darryl was able to dodge sticks elbows and bone crushing hits on the ice and use his brains and wits to out last the bandits who ran MLG off the ice.
Darryl's hero was Jean Belliveau and that is who he tried to model his game after. He had a physical element. He was a terrific leader.. He seemed to have that sense that the greats did to get to the right places at the right time

Darryl was A Quintiessential leaf.

Sittler's ties to the NHL started early. His first good pair of hockey skates belonged to former neighbour Rod Seiling, who was starring with the New York Rangers. By fifteen, Darryl was being noticed, and during the midget draft in 1967, was selected third overall by the Junior A London Nationals, coached by Leaf legend Turk Broda.

He was drafted by the Leafs 8th overall in the 1970 Entry Draft." Unlike today's top fifty or sixty picks, very few of the better players eligible for selection attended the draft session," Darryl stated. Toronto had the eighth pick, and chose the London Knights centre. "I was hard at work building swimming pools in London," laughs Darryl, remembering his draft day. "I'd been a Maple Leaf about five or six hours before I found out. I heard the news on the radio on the way home from my summer job that evening."

Jim Gregory, the Leafs' general manager, had plans for Darryl, but they weren't at centre ice. "We felt we were in good shape at centre then with Ullman,Keon,Walton and Harrison. But we did need help on the left side," he told the Toronto Star. "Just about everybody in the organization had a chance to scout Sittler and they all rated him very high."

Johnny McLellan (Leaf coach) told me he'd give me a chance to make the team as a Left Winger, Sittler was determined to make it. "As I watched Keon zip up and down the ice, I wondered if I'd ever get close to Keon's speed and skills," Sittler mused in a Toronto Sun article. Leaf management tipped there hat that they had designs on the young forward when they gave him #27 which was the number Frank Mahovlich had worn. "I figured management was trying to send me a message." sittler said.

Sittler had worn 9 as a junior.His idols were centres - Norm Ullman and Jean Beliveau. Mahovlich was a left winger. But I was well aware what he'd done as a Leaf. He'd been one of their greatest players so it gave me a really good feeling when I was handed his number."

He saw limited action in his first pro season in 1970-71 because he
broke his wrist and missed ten weeks of action, but was back for the playoffs. He scored a modest 10 goals and collected 18 points in an abbreviated rookie season.


Because of the injury he had an unremarkable sophomore year scoring just 32 points.When he returned to training camp the following year, Darryl was determined to do better. However he neeeded strength and conditioning to his injured wrist because it was giving him trouble. He couldn't shoot hard enough and wasn't releasing the puck quickly enough. He strengthened his wrist by squeezing springs and played with a brace on my wrist."

In 1972-73, he began to establish himself as an offensive star, finishing with 77 points - a total he would better in all but three of his subsequent 12 seasons in the NHL.

In 1973-74 the leafs signed him to a lucarative 5 yr deal. Things were looking up for the leafs under coach Red Kelly. Sittler and his young team mates Borje Salming, Inge Hammarstrom, Lanny McDonald and Ian Turnbull would all be part of a memorable 1970's leafs team.

The following seasons illustrated Darryl's consistency - 36 goals and 80 points in 1974-75, 41 goals and 100 points in '75-76 and 38 goals and 90 points in '76-77

Darryl Sittler is arguably the most popular player in the history of the Toronto Maple Leafs. No other player performed so well for so long amidst the cartoonish buffoonery of Leafs owner Harold Ballard.
The Leafs were in a rebuilding phase early in his career and many veterans either retired or were traded.September 1975 the 24-year-old Sittler took over the captain's duties, becoming the second-youngest captain in Leafs history after Teeder Kennedy.

"We wanted Sittler as the captain because he wasn't afraid to speak up for his teammates, he was a man respected by both players and management," stated Jim Gregory


Sittler had an incredible year in 1975-76. On February 7, 1976, he produced the greatest offensive game in the history of the National Hockey League, guaranteeing his place in the record books even after Wayne Gretzky had come and gone. Toronto was hosting the Boston Bruins, a team on a seven-game winning streak. The Bruins had recently reacquired Gerry Cheevers, but coach Don Cherry wanted to give the goalie a rest before his upcoming Boston homecoming and started rookie netminder instead. Poor Dave Reece, who was in goal for the Bruins that night, would never play another NHL game
The Leafs beat up the Bruins 11-4, but Sittler was the big story. He had two assists in the first period, three goals and two assists in the second and another hat trick in the third. The total of six goals and four assists set a league record for points in one game that had previously been held by Maurice "Rocket" Richard with eight.

The big night helped Sittler become the first Leaf to reach the 100 mark in scoring in a season, collecting 41 goals and 59 assists. But he wasn't finished.

Much has been made about the 'Pyramid Power' that Red Kelly used to help motivate his team. The Leafs were under terrific pressure to beat the Flyers. Owner Harold Ballard predicted that the Leafs would whip the Flyers in five games. Kelly, whose sons had visited Egypt and spoke passionately about the supernatural powers of the pyramid, gave their father an idea. He placed pyramids under the Leaf bench and in the dressing room. "Red put a pyramid in the dressing room. I put my sticks underneath it hoping it might help." It seemed to help, but so did the assistance of something else - "I have a tie I wear when it's a crucial game," admitted Sittler. "I wore it one night when I got three goals. I had it on the time I had the ten points against Boston. I felt this game was so crucial, I went to the cleaners to pick up the tie specially." Whether it was pyramids or lucky ties, Darryl had another outstanding game. "I don't really know how to describe how I feel. I guess I feel lucky. I just don't know why it happened

During the playoffs in April against the Philadelphia Flyers, Sittler scored five goals in one game, tying the playoff record.

In September, during the Canada Cup in Montreal, Sittler would make headlines again with his scoring ways. This time it wasn't the quantity but the quality and the timeliness that made the impression. In overtime of the second game of the best-of-three finals versus Czechoslovakia, Sittler held onto the puck on a partial breakaway until Czech goalie Vladimir Dzurilla committed himself and an opening presented itself. The goal secured the championship and made Sittler an overnight hero in Canada. "It was an experience I'll never forget. Just being on the team was fantastic" said sittler.

Most Memorable Goal

In his autobiography, Sittler explained the integral role of assistant coach Don Cherry's in Darryl's landmark goal on September 15, 1976. With the score tied at four after regulation time, Cherry addressed Team Canada "'I've been upstairs watching this guy, Dzurilla, for three games,' he began. 'He likes to come out real fast to cut down the angle on any rush. After you go in over the blueline, fake a slapper. If you see him come out of his net, draw it back in and go wide and deeper. He'll leave you with most of the net empty.'" During overtime, Sittler carried the puck down the left wing, faked a shot at netminder Vladimir Dzurilla, who had come out fifteen feet to cut down the angle, then skated past the goalie and deposited the puck into the open net at 11:33 of overtime to give Team Canada a sweep in the best of three final over Czechoslovakia to claim the first Canada Cup title. "After I scored the goal, the whole team surrounded me out on the ice and we went into a group hug with Lanny (McDonald) leading the world in oxygen-threatening squeezes and hollering," wrote Darryl in 'Sittler.' The goal scoring hero earned a spot as the tournament's All-Star left winger, as well.

In 1977-78, Sittler registered 117 points and was selected to the league's Second All-Star Team. The Leafs had their best playoff showing in years, making it to the semi-finals. But things began to fall apart, for the franchise and for its captain, in 1979-80 when cantankerous owner Harold Ballard replaced much of his management, bringing in Punch Imlach to run the team.

On July 4, 1979, Harold Ballard shocked the hockey world by re-hiring Punch Imlach to run the Maple Leafs. One of his first moves was to prevent Darryl from participating in a 'Hockey Night in Canada' intermission feature called 'Showdown.' Both Sittler and Leaf goaltender Mike Palmateer had been selected to participate in the skills competition. In his first meeting with the new GM, Sittler quotes Imlach as saying, "I'm the GM. You don't decide to go to 'Showdown,' I decide, and I don't want you to go." Darryl went to the show's taping and, in spite of a last ditch effort by the Leafs to prevent the two stars from taking part, did so wearing generic sweaters. But it was the first of a series of confrontations between Imlach and Sittler. Eventually, to assert his power, the Leafs' general manager traded away a number of players close to Darryl, who happened to have a no-trade clause in his own contract. First to go was Pat Boutette, a former teammate with the London Nationals. Then, it was Lanny McDonald, Sittler's closest friend on the Leafs. "The shock was so palpable, some of the guys fell back or slumped in their seats as if they'd been struck physically," Sittler recalled in his autobiography. Darryl questioned management and whether he wanted to continue as the team's on-ice leader. 'When I was made captain, it was the happiest day of my life,' Sittler wrote in a letter announcing his resignation as captain of the Toronto Maple Leafs. "In a very emotional speech to the players, I explained what I was doing, and why I was doing it. Imlach was trying to break down this whole team, didn't want me as captain and wouldn't let me function as one. All of the outside controversy had gotten too big; all I wanted to do as play hockey."

Further changes took place that impacted on the team and on Sittler personally. Dave Hutchison was traded - he, too, a former teammate of Darryl's in London. Then, another linemate and friend, Tiger Williams, was sent to the Canucks. Darryl remembers, "I had my mind made up that I wanted to stay in Toronto. I was going to outlast this guy (Imlach). I didn't deserve any of this, I couldn't understand why it was happening to me, but I could overcome it."

Sittler was represented by Alan Eagleson, a lawyer and agent who never saw eye to eye with Ballard or Imlach. Relations were strained to the point that Sittler took a pair of scissors to the "C" on his sweater before a game in late 1979 to protest, among other things, the trade of Lanny McDonald to the Colorado Rockies. Ballard then threatened to lock Sittler out before the beginning of the next season. The two men resolved some of their differences and Sittler returned as captain, but it was a tenuous reconciliation. Midway through the 1981-82 season, Sittler went AWOL and demanded a trade. He was depressed and worn out from his battles with management in Toronto.


On January 20, 1982, Gerry McNamara, who had replaced Imlach as the team's general manager, called Sittler and informed him that he had been traded to the Philadelphia Flyers, a one-time nemesis but a team that nonetheless had a great deal of respect for Sittler.

After recovering from the nasty divorce with the Leafs, Sittler had a great season in 1982-83, netting 83 points and a spot in the All-Star Game.On the day he was to be named captain of the Flyers Draryl was shocked when Philadelphia traded him to the Detroit Red Wings before the 1984-85 season.

Unsure if he wanted to continue and move his family to yet another city, Sittler refused to report for five days. He did play one yr with Detroit, though at times he struggled to find a place in the lineup.
He retired after the season. Sittler was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1989. Two years later he returned to the Toronto Maple Leafs, this time working in the club's management in marketing and public relations.

NHL Totals 1096 Games 484 goals, 637 assists 1,121 points.

Playoff Totals 76 29 45 74 137

Second All-Star Team Centre (1978)


Career Notes:

Although just an hour down the highway from Toronto, Darryl was not a Leaf fan. "I grew up as the only Montreal Canadiens fan in a family of 10 and all were Leafs fans."-autobiography, 'Sittler.'

Once, while playing cribbage with Jacques Plante and Errol Thompson during a flight, Darryl came up with a perfect hand. "That's a one-in-a-million thing, something that happens to a very, very few cribbage players, even those who play the game every day all their lives," laughed Sittler in an interview with The Hockey News


In 1989, Herbie Lewis, Vladislav Tretiak, Alan Eagleson and Darryl Sittler were inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, capping outstanding NHL careers. Darryl reflected in Mike Ulmer's book, 'Captains,' "The reality of it is, I was fortunate to play fifteen years, making a living at something I really loved doing. To end up in the Hall of Fame, to score the winning goal at the Canada Cup and all those other things that happened, even though we didn't win the Cup, I appreciated that."

Sittlers #27 was Honoured by the Leafs February 8, 2003. In 1993, the Leafs began a policy of "Honoured Numbers" for their greatest stars:

Sittler #27 Turk Broda and Johnny Bower (1), King Clancy and Tim Horton (7), Charlie Conacher and Ted Kennedy (9), Syl Apps and George Armstrong (10) and of course, Frank Mahovlich (27), in the pantheon of the Leafs greats. Only two numbers, Bill Barilko's No. 5 and the No. 6 worn by Ace Bailey, loaned to Ron Ellis and then re-enshrined, are out of permanent circulation. Sittler knew most of the players who's numbers hang from the rafters of the ACC.

- Served as team captain from 1975 until Dec. 29, 1979, when he removed the C from his sweater to protest the trade of Lanny McDonald. Accepted the captaincy again at the start of the 1980-81 season.
- On Feb. 7, 1976, set an NHL record with a 10-point game -- six goals and four assists.
- On April 22, 1976, scored five goals in one playoff game.
- In September 1976, scored the winning goal in overtime in the final game against Czechoslovakia to give Canada the first Canada Cup championship.
- In 1977-78, established career highs with 45 goals and 72 assists and led the Leafs to the Stanley Cup semi-finals.
- In 1989, elected to Hockey Hall of Fame

He was also one tough dude. In one of the best fights I ever saw, Sittler versus Gary Howatt (the Toy Tiger) of the New York Islanders. They dropped the gloves at centre ice at Maple Leaf Gardens and just pounded each other for about 3 minutes (at one stage they were just alternating punches to the head back and forth), then after fatigue they both dropped to there knees at the same time and while on there knees continued to slug it out for another 2 minutes. They both quit at the same time. They recieved a standing ovation. Seemed like they both landed about 50 punches each.
Sittler was the real deal, would have been a first line centre on any team in the NHL to-day Leaf Fan -nick Northern Dancer

- Remember Darryl played in a different era, and played both ways.
The biggest disappointment as a Darryl fan was that he didn't get the Lou Marsh award in 1976. Lafleur got it, I believe.Sitt had his 10 point night, ended up 3rd in league scoring, I believe he had his 5 goal playoff game against Philly that year, scored the Canada Cup winning goal in the first true world cup of hockey, was voted to the tourney all star team..........should have been a tap in - he got screwed- Big Phil

He had a career high of 45 goals and 117 points in '77-78. And despite not winning a Cup he was still a pretty good playoff performer. he did everything very good. He could skate, shoot, pass and if he had to drop the gloves he wasnt a bad fighter either. Sittler was once a second team all-star in 1978 when he was third in scoring.- Leaf Fan

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