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Ice Skates, need your advice.

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06-28-2006, 06:04 AM
  #1
Taranis_24
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Ice Skates, need your advice.

I've just started playing ice hockey at the age of 45. I know a late start. A buddy gave me a pair of CCM 1052's, the guys on the team say they may be a little to stiff for me, plus you can tell that the runners have been replaced you can see the old holes. I have some problems with the right skate pronating and being on the inside edge. So I'm hoping you guys can give me some advice on trying to find the right skate, one that's maybe not to stiff but still stable enough for a guy just starting out. Money isn't really a problem, well it is if my wife finds out so would like to keep it somewhat reasonable $125-$200. Been checking the normal websites hockeygiant/1800faceoff and hockeymonkey but they don't say much about the stiffness of the skate or I'm not knowledgeable enough to read between the lines.

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06-28-2006, 08:49 AM
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stick9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taranis_24
I've just started playing ice hockey at the age of 45. I know a late start. A buddy gave me a pair of CCM 1052's, the guys on the team say they may be a little to stiff for me, plus you can tell that the runners have been replaced you can see the old holes. I have some problems with the right skate pronating and being on the inside edge. So I'm hoping you guys can give me some advice on trying to find the right skate, one that's maybe not to stiff but still stable enough for a guy just starting out. Money isn't really a problem, well it is if my wife finds out so would like to keep it somewhat reasonable $125-$200. Been checking the normal websites hockeygiant/1800faceoff and hockeymonkey but they don't say much about the stiffness of the skate or I'm not knowledgeable enough to read between the lines.
In your case. I strongly recomend going to your local hockey shop. They will be able to fit you properly and help you find a skate that meets your needs.

epuck.com is a good place to do some research on skates. Remember, if you buy online you'll have to pay to have them baked (heat molded to your feet), sharpened, and radiused. Depending in the shop that could run you another $50.

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06-28-2006, 08:04 PM
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xeric716x
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like the last poster said, its all personal needs. go to you local shop and just try on different type of skates. it wont be before log you find a pair you like.

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06-29-2006, 10:16 PM
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night-timer
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I have two pairs of skates and one pair was giving me the same pronating problem - on the left foot. Heat moulding (baking, oven-fit, whatever you want to call it) largely fixed the problem.

Skating requires that you be centered on your blades (when gliding, anyway) and keeping your feet close together. Many beginners 'railroad' (keeping their legs far apart, as it helps them feel more balanced). With experience, you will eventualy overcome this and learn proper stride and glide techniques.

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06-29-2006, 10:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taranis_24
A buddy gave me a pair of CCM 1052's, the guys on the team say they may be a little to stiff for me, plus you can tell that the runners have been replaced you can see the old holes. I have some problems with the right skate pronating and being on the inside edge.
Determine for sure whether 1052s can be heat moulded. Not all skates can. It will soften the boot, helping the stiffness problem.

CCM heat moulding uses both an oven and a vacuum, whereas Bauer heat moulding just uses the oven. So, a proper CCM heat fit could really help you to soften the boot, mould it to your foot, fix the pronate and shorten the break-in time.

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07-02-2006, 06:24 AM
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Jeffw-13
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Like the others said, the best thing to do is go to the shop and try on different skates and get the ones that fit best. Proper fit is the most important aspect in selecting a skate.

As for stiffness, the top of the line is usually also the stiffest. Look at the mid level skates and they will generally be less stiff after breaking them in.

Also, check out www.modsquadhockey.com for questions on hockey gear. There's several guys who work in pro shops and even some equipment reps post there to answer questions.

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Old
07-03-2006, 09:46 PM
  #7
zingbergeur
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A lot of new skaters start out in skates that are too big for their feet. If a skate is too big, it can increase your pronating problems. You want your toes to just lightly feather the toecap of the skates.

Your best bet would be to go to a local hockey shop and get fitted. Even if it costs you a little more, you really can't put a price on a perfect fit. Also, as someone mentioned, your shop will bake and sharpen your skates for free if you buy from them.

If the 1052s are indeed a good fit, baking them will make them less stiff. they are able to be baked (I used to wear the same skates). I have a hunch that they are a little too big for you, but it is just my guess.

A general rule of thumb is that high end skates are stiffer than mid and low end skates. There are exceptions of course.

Good luck, and welcome to the greatest sport in the world!

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