HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > NHL Eastern Conference > Atlantic Division > Montreal Canadiens
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Notices

1971: Montreal's Longshot Victory

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
08-03-2006, 11:46 PM
  #1
Team_Spirit
Gangsta Pleks
 
Team_Spirit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 23,389
vCash: 50
1971: Montreal's Longshot Victory

http://www.nhl.com/history/game7_2.html

Good read about the '71 Cup run.

Team_Spirit is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 01:36 AM
  #2
Joey
Registered User
 
Joey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,091
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to Joey
thanks

Joey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 07:54 AM
  #3
mcphee
Registered User
 
mcphee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 19,105
vCash: 500
I've been lucky enough to follow 12 cup winning runs. 1971 weas my favorite. The Bruins were considered invincible that year. I can name 2 good Bruin posters who still cringe at that one. Either from the B's losing or the fact that they remember 71. [Sorry Wally and DKH].

I would think for young fans looking back, you'd wonder why it was an upset, the Mahovlich brothers,Beliveau, The Pocket, Cournoyer,Lemaire, Fergy,Tardif,Houle, on D, I think JC Tremblay was still there, Laperriere,Lapointe, Dryden in nets.

Few were in their prime though. Beliveau was winding it down, Lemaire wasn't the complete player he was to become, Laperriere wasn't what he was, Lapointe wasn't what he was going to be. Dryden was some brainy kid from Toronto who gave long answers.

I'd love to have a DVD chronicling that playoff and all the stories surrounding it. Al McNeil getting death threats, never a dull moment.

mcphee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 09:04 AM
  #4
Rather Gingerly 1*
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,832
vCash: 500
The major key to '71 cup was the trade for Frank Mahovlich. He had a great run when he came over to Montreal. Dryden gets most of the credit and was at the pinnacle of his career in '71, but "The Big M" game us another dimension.



Quote:
Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
I've been lucky enough to follow 12 cup winning runs. 1971 weas my favorite. The Bruins were considered invincible that year. I can name 2 good Bruin posters who still cringe at that one. Either from the B's losing or the fact that they remember 71. [Sorry Wally and DKH].

I would think for young fans looking back, you'd wonder why it was an upset, the Mahovlich brothers,Beliveau, The Pocket, Cournoyer,Lemaire, Fergy,Tardif,Houle, on D, I think JC Tremblay was still there, Laperriere,Lapointe, Dryden in nets.

Few were in their prime though. Beliveau was winding it down, Lemaire wasn't the complete player he was to become, Laperriere wasn't what he was, Lapointe wasn't what he was going to be. Dryden was some brainy kid from Toronto who gave long answers.

I'd love to have a DVD chronicling that playoff and all the stories surrounding it. Al McNeil getting death threats, never a dull moment.

Rather Gingerly 1* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 09:10 AM
  #5
mcphee
Registered User
 
mcphee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 19,105
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rather Gingerly 1 View Post
The major key to '71 cup was the trade for Frank Mahovlich. He had a great run when he came over to Montreal. Dryden gets most of the credit and was at the pinnacle of his career in '71, but "The Big M" game us another dimension.
The Big M remeins me a lot of Kovalev. They both could do stuff on the ice no one else could, but because it didn't happen every game, they were considered lazy. There was a difference between the Big M and Calude Larose in the same way there is between Begin and Kovalev.

The trade that brought Mahovlich here is a good trivia subject. They sent Mickey Redmond,Guy Charron and Bill Collins for him. Collins wore #10. When they ask who wear #10 before lafleur, you always hear Collins. When they made the deal, they were on the road, and they had no #27 jersey, so the Big M wore #10 for one game, making him the last player to wear the number before Guy.

mcphee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 11:31 AM
  #6
toshiro
HFBoards Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Western Canuckland
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,951
vCash: 500
Send a message via Yahoo to toshiro
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rather Gingerly 1 View Post
The major key to '71 cup was the trade for Frank Mahovlich. He had a great run when he came over to Montreal. Dryden gets most of the credit and was at the pinnacle of his career in '71, but "The Big M" game us another dimension.
He was incredible in that series. It was his finest moment he dominated. I asked Dale Hoganson how good Frank was in that series and he said ohhhhhh. Big M was incredible.

toshiro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 11:33 AM
  #7
Hackett
HF Needs Feeny
 
Hackett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Country: Canada
Posts: 16,693
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rather Gingerly 1 View Post
The major key to '71 cup was the trade for Frank Mahovlich. He had a great run when he came over to Montreal. Dryden gets most of the credit and was at the pinnacle of his career in '71, but "The Big M" game us another dimension.
Your description of the 71 scenario reminds me alot of 93.

Roy got a ton of credit for the run but I think Kirk Muller's playoff was very underrated. Of course, the habs wouldn't have the cup without Roy in 93 but I'd also say that if Muller got injured somewhere in that run, then the habs dont even come close to the cup either. Muller was very clutch and he never lost a battle along the boards while playing prime minutes.

Hackett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 11:33 AM
  #8
toshiro
HFBoards Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Western Canuckland
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,951
vCash: 500
Send a message via Yahoo to toshiro
Quote:
Originally Posted by Team_Spirit View Post
http://www.nhl.com/history/game7_2.html

Good read about the '71 Cup run.
What I also remember was the habs coming back in a game with Boston when it all seemed lost. The final score may have been 7-5

toshiro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 12:12 PM
  #9
mcphee
Registered User
 
mcphee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 19,105
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by toshiro View Post
What I also remember was the habs coming back in a game with Boston when it all seemed lost. The final score may have been 7-5
Might be my favorite all time game. Henri scored late in the 2nd to make it 5-2 and they went on from there. Boston still complains that Tom Johnson should have never played Eddie Johnston that game, though the start had been promised to him.

mcphee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 01:16 PM
  #10
toshiro
HFBoards Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Western Canuckland
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,951
vCash: 500
Send a message via Yahoo to toshiro
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
Might be my favorite all time game. Henri scored late in the 2nd to make it 5-2 and they went on from there. Boston still complains that Tom Johnson should have never played Eddie Johnston that game, though the start had been promised to him.
The suspense was incredible, eh?

toshiro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 01:33 PM
  #11
tinyzombies
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Calif via Montreal
Posts: 11,777
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
I've been lucky enough to follow 12 cup winning runs. 1971 weas my favorite. The Bruins were considered invincible that year. I can name 2 good Bruin posters who still cringe at that one. Either from the B's losing or the fact that they remember 71. [Sorry Wally and DKH].

I would think for young fans looking back, you'd wonder why it was an upset, the Mahovlich brothers,Beliveau, The Pocket, Cournoyer,Lemaire, Fergy,Tardif,Houle, on D, I think JC Tremblay was still there, Laperriere,Lapointe, Dryden in nets.

Few were in their prime though. Beliveau was winding it down, Lemaire wasn't the complete player he was to become, Laperriere wasn't what he was, Lapointe wasn't what he was going to be. Dryden was some brainy kid from Toronto who gave long answers.

I'd love to have a DVD chronicling that playoff and all the stories surrounding it. Al McNeil getting death threats, never a dull moment.
I've got a half-hour or 45 minute special about it somewhere which I used to watch over-and-over. Lots of wah-wah guitar and horns. '71 is about 10 years before my time. 76-77 is around when my childhood memories start kicking in (a vintage year also).

tinyzombies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-04-2006, 07:31 PM
  #12
Duster
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 682
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
Might be my favorite all time game. Henri scored late in the 2nd to make it 5-2 and they went on from there. Boston still complains that Tom Johnson should have never played Eddie Johnston that game, though the start had been promised to him.
My favourite Boston-Montreal game by far. One of the most amazing comebacks I've ever seen. I really thought the Habs were done like dinner when the B's scored goal number 5..

The look on Orr's face when the game was over was eloquent to say the least. Total shock.

The playoff series against Chicago was awesome as well. A real nail biter. Henri with the winner in the third period of game 7. I loathed Jim Pappin during that series...

Duster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2006, 09:32 AM
  #13
ChesterNimitz
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: CinCPac
Country: Midway Islands
Posts: 521
vCash: 500
The 1971 Playoffs

[QUOTE=Hackett;6210646]Your description of the 71 scenario reminds me alot of 93.

With respect, aside from the fact that the Canadiens were the eventual Stanley Cup Champions, the team’s playoff runs in 1971 and 1993 were completely dissimilar.

In 1993, the prohibitive favorites entering the playoffs, the Pittsburgh Penguins, were upset by another team, the Islanders. As in 1986 (when the Oilers were upset by the Flames) the Islanders unexpected victory in 1993 opened the road for all other teams to have a legitimate chance for the cup. In 1971, however, it was the Montreal Canadiens themselves who had to upset the overwhelming favorites: the Boston Bruins.

Another significant difference was coaching. In 1993 the Canadiens were coached by the largely inept and incompetent Jacques Demers whose ersatz coaching system was composed of pep talks and instructions to score one more goal than the other team. In the 1993 playoffs, Demers coached by proxy, relying on Carbonneau, and the injured Denis Savard and Rob Rammage to change lines and implement game strategies. In 1971, Montreal was fortunate to have the cerebral (and yes, unilingual) Al McNeil as their coach. It was McNeil who opted to go with an untested Ken Dryden as the Canadiens’ starting goaltender. More importantly, it was McNeil who devised the strategy of moving Henri Richard to left wing to check Bobby Orr. Though he was on the downslide of a great career, Richard still had enough skating ability to ‘funnel’ Orr to the center of the ice where the Montreal centers could assist in containing this great player. The tactic worked and except for occasional displays of brilliance, Orr was not the determining factor in the series. Once Orr’s puck transporting abilities were minimized, the balance of the Boston team was exposed. They did not have the speed to contend with the Cournoyers, Lemaires, Lapointes, Mahovolichs, Houles, Tardiffs etc. that Montreal kept sending at them. Montreal’s superior team speed coupled with great goaltending (Dryden); great leadership (Beliveau, Ferguson & Richard) and McNeil’s coaching resulted in the ‘miracle’ of 1971. Perhaps it wasn’t such a miracle after all.

That is all.


Last edited by ChesterNimitz: 08-07-2006 at 10:29 AM.
ChesterNimitz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2006, 04:13 PM
  #14
Gee Wally
Grumpy
 
Gee Wally's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: HF retirement home
Country: United States
Posts: 38,191
vCash: 500
Awards:
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
I've been lucky enough to follow 12 cup winning runs. 1971 weas my favorite. The Bruins were considered invincible that year. I can name 2 good Bruin posters who still cringe at that one. Either from the B's losing or the fact that they remember 71. [Sorry Wally and DKH].

I would think for young fans looking back, you'd wonder why it was an upset, the Mahovlich brothers,Beliveau, The Pocket, Cournoyer,Lemaire, Fergy,Tardif,Houle, on D, I think JC Tremblay was still there, Laperriere,Lapointe, Dryden in nets.

Few were in their prime though. Beliveau was winding it down, Lemaire wasn't the complete player he was to become, Laperriere wasn't what he was, Lapointe wasn't what he was going to be. Dryden was some brainy kid from Toronto who gave long answers.

I'd love to have a DVD chronicling that playoff and all the stories surrounding it. Al McNeil getting death threats, never a dull moment.


Dryden was simply unbelievable. I can remember it like yesterday bud...as Cheevers put it .."the big giraffe" was unbeatable. I wish we had vcrs in them days 'cause the kiddie corp here would have been able to see saves that would make their eyes fall out.

The Bruins had a great team that year...arguably one of the single greatest ever assembled. But, as us old guys know, on paper is one thing...on the ice something all together different.

Gee Wally is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-06-2006, 09:18 AM
  #15
DKH
Registered User
 
DKH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 30,869
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to DKH
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
I've been lucky enough to follow 12 cup winning runs. 1971 weas my favorite. The Bruins were considered invincible that year. I can name 2 good Bruin posters who still cringe at that one. Either from the B's losing or the fact that they remember 71. [Sorry Wally and DKH].

I would think for young fans looking back, you'd wonder why it was an upset, the Mahovlich brothers,Beliveau, The Pocket, Cournoyer,Lemaire, Fergy,Tardif,Houle, on D, I think JC Tremblay was still there, Laperriere,Lapointe, Dryden in nets.

Few were in their prime though. Beliveau was winding it down, Lemaire wasn't the complete player he was to become, Laperriere wasn't what he was, Lapointe wasn't what he was going to be. Dryden was some brainy kid from Toronto who gave long answers.

I'd love to have a DVD chronicling that playoff and all the stories surrounding it. Al McNeil getting death threats, never a dull moment.
that one hurt the most I screw around about Huet and the Habs defense but as a Bruins fan I love it when the Habs are a great team- I grew up respecting the crap out of the Habs and there was nothing like a Saturday night game watching the Bruins and Habs- with usually the Bruins getting beat ...I follow these guys the closest and think the Habs are going to be very good. Samsonov was one of my favorites and lived a few miles away and was a good kid. I'll root for him and the Habs like I always do- but to end up behind the Bruins one way or another. I was lucky enough to go see the Belliveaus, Cournoyers, Trembleys, Duffs, Mahavolichs, etc as a kid and were they awesome

DKH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-06-2006, 09:20 AM
  #16
DKH
Registered User
 
DKH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 30,869
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to DKH
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duster View Post
My favourite Boston-Montreal game by far. One of the most amazing comebacks I've ever seen. I really thought the Habs were done like dinner when the B's scored goal number 5..

The look on Orr's face when the game was over was eloquent to say the least. Total shock.

The playoff series against Chicago was awesome as well. A real nail biter. Henri with the winner in the third period of game 7. I loathed Jim Pappin during that series...
I was about 11 or 12 that game but like the smell of whiskey that game can turn my stomach from a bad experience many years ago- I used to love whiskey in college and one Spring Break in the late 70' or early 80's I got so sick from it to this day I look at a bottle I want to barf- same thing is all this talk about that series and specifically THAT game

DKH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-06-2006, 08:42 PM
  #17
pappyline
Registered User
 
pappyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Mass/formerly Ont
Country: United States
Posts: 4,176
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Team_Spirit View Post
http://www.nhl.com/history/game7_2.html

Good read about the '71 Cup run.
That was a very lucky Stanley cup for the Canasdans as the attached article confirms. Forget about Boston. Chicago had them on the ropes in the 7th game of the finals until Esposito choked on Lemaire's floater from center ice. Montreal got lucky as usual.

pappyline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-06-2006, 10:57 PM
  #18
tinyzombies
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Calif via Montreal
Posts: 11,777
vCash: 500
"Another significant difference was coaching. In 1993 the Canadiens were coached by the largely inept and incompetent Jacques Demers whose ersatz coaching system was composed of pep talks and instructions to score one more goal than the other team. In the 1993 playoffs, Demers coached by proxy, relying on Carboneau, and the injured Denis Savard and Rob Rammage to change lines and implement game strategies."

I guess those two Jack Adams Trophies he won were an accident?

tinyzombies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-06-2006, 10:59 PM
  #19
F. Duchemin
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: St-Hilaire
Country: Canada
Posts: 776
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to F. Duchemin
wow that is a pretty rude comment. Who is the man who wrote that? :\

F. Duchemin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-06-2006, 11:09 PM
  #20
Lowetide
Registered User
 
Lowetide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Country: Canada
Posts: 13,281
vCash: 500
That was an amazing spring. The Habs-Bruins and then the Habs-Hawks followed later that year were incredible. Those were great teams, all of them deserved to win a Stanley. Oh well, my Bruins won two of three.

1971 hurt though. Kind of like this spring.

Lowetide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-07-2006, 01:00 AM
  #21
ChesterNimitz
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: CinCPac
Country: Midway Islands
Posts: 521
vCash: 500
Sometimes its better to be lucky than good

Quote:
I guess those two Jack Adams Trophies he won were an accident?
Even a broken clock is right two times a day.

That is all.

ChesterNimitz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-07-2006, 02:22 PM
  #22
tinyzombies
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Calif via Montreal
Posts: 11,777
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNimitz View Post
Even a broken clock is right two times a day.

That is all.
Dude, Demers is one of the few people around here who DOES know hockey. At least in the media. This guy knows what he's talking about, he's not just some cheerleader coach type (though he did that too). Come on. You don't win the Adams award twice and then make a group overachieve to win a Cup if you can't coach. He also did a fine job in St.Louis and Detroit. His accomplishments speak for themselves, he doesn't need anyone to stand up for him, but you should listen to his commentary on RDS (if you speak French and get the channel) and see for yourself.

tinyzombies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-07-2006, 03:42 PM
  #23
mcphee
Registered User
 
mcphee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 19,105
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duster View Post
My favourite Boston-Montreal game by far. One of the most amazing comebacks I've ever seen. I really thought the Habs were done like dinner when the B's scored goal number 5..

The look on Orr's face when the game was over was eloquent to say the least. Total shock.

The playoff series against Chicago was awesome as well. A real nail biter. Henri with the winner in the third period of game 7. I loathed Jim Pappin during that series...
I had a hate on for Jim Pappin too. It must've meant he was pretty good I guess. I believe it was G1 of the finals, Chicago won after what seemed like a long overtime. I swear I saw the Chicago player, in a goal mouth scramble, glove the puck across the crease to whoever scored. Pappin either scored or directed the puck. I was going nuts the way a 16 only can. The thing is, no one else saw it, leading me to wonder if it really happened.

Chester, I'm not going to argue that Jacques Demers was a great coach, my own belief is that he wasn't. He was the right coach for that team that year though,93.

I dispute your comments on Denis Savard. My thinking is that Savard simply wasn't cutting it on the ice and his spot behind the bench was an attempt at including him. He had no real influence.

mcphee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-08-2006, 08:06 PM
  #24
ChesterNimitz
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: CinCPac
Country: Midway Islands
Posts: 521
vCash: 500
History Does Not Lie

Quote:
I dispute your comments on Denis Savard. My thinking is that Savard simply wasn't cutting it on the ice and his spot behind the bench was an attempt at including him. He had no real influence

Maybe the old Admiral is losing it. But then again, maybe not. I refer you to legendsofhockey.net which states:

Although Savard won the Stanley Cup championship he so desired, 1992-93 wasn't without its challenges. One of the great offensive centres of the eighties found himself playing wing on Guy Carbonneau's checking line. Then, after playing the first two rounds of the playoffs, Savard broke his foot and spent the remainder of the playoffs, including the clinching game, behind the bench as an assistant to coach Jacques Demers.

As for Demers, the only 'right' thing about him was that he was wise enough to stay out the way and let others do his bidding.

That is all.


Last edited by ChesterNimitz: 08-09-2006 at 08:02 AM.
ChesterNimitz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-22-2006, 01:09 PM
  #25
Rather Gingerly 1*
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,832
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
The Big M remeins me a lot of Kovalev. They both could do stuff on the ice no one else could, but because it didn't happen every game, they were considered lazy.
The Big M was more like Jagr of today than Kovalev. First ballot Hall-of-Famer, etc... one of the top 3-5 players in the game at that time. Kovalev is much further down the list. Maybe one of the top 25-30 players in the game

Rather Gingerly 1* is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:34 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2015 All Rights Reserved.