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Explosive speed?

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Old
08-08-2006, 09:20 AM
  #1
Twine Seeking Missle
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Explosive speed?

I played ice hockey all throughout my childhood but havent played in a league for about 4 years. I am now 23 and I just joined a roller hockey league for ages 21-30. I have played 2 games so far and I am having a speed problem. My top speed is pretty good but the 1st two or three steps are not explosive enough. As a result I am usually caught by the time i get to full speed. My question is... how do I work on this? Is there anyhting I can do (either on skates or off skates) to become more explosive? Thanks in advance for any input.

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08-08-2006, 11:59 AM
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Skate more and more, and just work on your starts. Idk what website...but there's a few that show you form and stuff, maybe someone else can drop a link.

Off skates-wise...run like 50 yard sprints around a track, then walk 50 and sprint another 50. Add in some squats and legs press at the gym too, that might help build stronger muscles.

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08-08-2006, 02:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twine Seeking Missle View Post
I played ice hockey all throughout my childhood but havent played in a league for about 4 years. I am now 23 and I just joined a roller hockey league for ages 21-30. I have played 2 games so far and I am having a speed problem. My top speed is pretty good but the 1st two or three steps are not explosive enough. As a result I am usually caught by the time i get to full speed. My question is... how do I work on this? Is there anyhting I can do (either on skates or off skates) to become more explosive? Thanks in advance for any input.
Yep! Here it is.... A dry land program that focuses on deep knee bends. Check out this on-Ice portion of the program that we teach at our summer camp.
ftp://usr2240:[email protected]/pa.../chriskelo.wmv

Head coach

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08-08-2006, 09:31 PM
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sc37
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Someone told me to run hills too...

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08-08-2006, 10:25 PM
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Just get stronger in the legs through training, and use quick short steps to gain speed quickly

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08-09-2006, 01:22 PM
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Thanks for the replies guys. Definately going to run hills that sounds like the perfect way to achieve what I want. Also need to build the stamina so im also gonna run/jog 2 miles every 2 or 3 days.

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08-09-2006, 01:40 PM
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IMO, along with working out your legs, you should get some buddies to play foot hockey. The speed you'll get through building up your legs will be useless unless you have the hands to create plays at top speed.

Foot hockey (and not roller hockey) forces you to stickhandle and use your hands while you're moving your feet. Even if you watch alot of pros you'll see that some have to stop moving their feet to make a move.

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08-13-2006, 03:35 PM
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I do hill/interval training on the stationary bike

if you dont have much leg mass built up you could try some squats

if you tree trunks already you just need to worry about conditioning

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08-13-2006, 07:32 PM
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My coach has us doing "explosive" drills during off-season.

Set up an obstacle (a basketball or a small box) and stand behind it. Jump over the object and do 3-4 high knees then follow that up with long strides for a few yards.

Lunges work wonders on your legs, as do squats. Remember, hockey isn't about how much you can bench press. It's mostly leg strength.

Hold a weight (preferably a plate) and squat down with it between your legs. Then in one fluid motion, jump up and drive the plate into the air above your head. Then come down and bring the weight down as you were in one fluid motion. Do 3 sets of 10 reps. A good weight is 10-25 pounds.

Take a medecine ball and try to throw it two handed (like a basketball chest pass into the air) as high and as far as possible. Be sure to get low to the ground and push with your legs as well as with your arms. Try to touch the ball before it bounces. Push even with both arms.

Squat thrusts and mountain climbers are good exercises as well.

That's pretty much our entire "explosive" workout. If you need explanation or some different ways to do those, PM me.

-Phil

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08-13-2006, 08:43 PM
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gbl1p
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Seriously, the most ridiculously simple thing to do is find a long hill and do intense runs up and down. If you can mimic a shift or a short spurt like 10-20 secs of intense climbing at speed, you will see massive returns on the ice sheet.

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08-13-2006, 11:24 PM
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I'm not really a great skater but leg workouts have helped me a bunch recently. Leg presses, calf-thingamajigs, quadricep-doohickies and hammy workouts.

I feel slightly faster but am much sturdier on my skates, overall. Cutting the ice better, too.

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08-13-2006, 11:26 PM
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I just found this. It's got pretty good drills actualy this is AMAZING stuff.
http://www.nikebauer.com/
in the top menu select "training"
then select "exercises".
you will find 50 or so exercises in 5 categories. Warmup,Speed,Strength,Conditioning,Cooldown.
It's some of the exercises from this commercial.
http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...66017257789604


Last edited by znk: 08-13-2006 at 11:40 PM.
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08-13-2006, 11:27 PM
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Originally Posted by gbl1p View Post
Seriously, the most ridiculously simple thing to do is find a long hill and do intense runs up and down. If you can mimic a shift or a short spurt like 10-20 secs of intense climbing at speed, you will see massive returns on the ice sheet.
Yea I'll agree the best way to train for hockey is to train like you would play, one of my favorite things to do was to find a track and do laps, only I would alternate between a jog and a sprint. I would start out by jogging a lap then after one lap sprint for a lap. This worked well for me because my coach liked to keep short shifts but if I was playing in an adult league I would go maybe 3 laps then 3 laps, just try to get the timing close to how long your shifts are. Simply if your team rotates 3 lines, and you take 40 second shifts then sprint for 40 seconds jog for 80 and repeat.

You can adjust this to fit you and the way your team plays. One thing I would stress is to train for longer than you would play. Ex: if I take 25 shifts a game I would do 50 or so laps and I found I was almost always the freshest player on the ice at the end of the game. Don't worry if you can't do it all at once, just do what you can and work your way up.

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08-14-2006, 02:21 AM
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I've get best results to build up my speed by doing many different practices right way. I will give some basic advices.

1) The idea for explosive speed in hockey is same as in sprint (read books about muscle training of sprinters).
2) Equation number 1 : muscle mass = speed. So you need to build up a good (not huge, just good) muscles for your legs and for upper body too, because good runner (sprinter) and skater uses his hands as well as legs when his gettin to top speed.
3) Run intensively up in hills - even better if you find some craggy and long stairs.
4) When you have some muscles (after three months good training in gym (three times/week)) start to do muscle training for explosivity. Use light wages and make different jumps (jumps from deep squat and slighter jumps up from half squat) to develope your enterior femorals and calves (use some plank to get move for calves start from lower lever).
5) Try to learn to read a game better so that you are not so often staying on your skates without speed


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08-14-2006, 09:56 AM
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Hills are awesome, but for explosive speed you don't want to be going for any more than 20-30 seconds. You're trying to improve the first few steps not train to deal with lactic acid right? If you let your legs go lactic you are no longer working on explosiveness but rather speed endurance. The workout will start to become to aerobic and you won't be getting what you say you need, although an aerobic hill workout is great sometimes. Squat jumps and Borzovs (sp) are also great for explosiveness. If you want to do something in the weight room then cleans are great. One power hill workout I like to do is 2-3 sets of 100m, 80m, 70m 60m, 50m with walk down rest and then about 3 minutes between sets. Also, don't be discouraged if it doesn't happen right away, you're at an age where fast twitch fibres are VERY hard to develop, but it is possible.

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08-14-2006, 02:46 PM
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I debated whether or not to post this but I figure you could make up your own mind how far to push yourself. All you need is long staircase. I started skating late at 12 years old, but by the time I went to collage I was one of the faster players. I have to think the staircase was a big reason for that. My boarding school had a dreaded 132 steps staircase on a slope (funny how I still remember all 132 steps.) Later in collage I used the football stadium.

To start out you want to do a deep knee hop, only hop up one stair, but go as far right as you can then as far left, with each hop you want to land near the left side then the right side. Youíll want a partner to be on you and make sure you bend down as far as you can go each time. You can do it without bending down low but youíll miss out on the whole point. For first step thrust you really need to deep bending motion. The first semester my coach refused to let us do more than one step, insisting form was the more important then speed or power. (Deep knees!)

Later on we jumped two steps and then three, and would be timed as we did sprints up the stair case. The drill lasted about an hour, sprint the stairs, walk down the hill, stand in line, then back up the stairs. You wanted your muscle memory to not only to learn the deep knee bending motion but also the pushing outward motion. We also did the typical gym thing as well, heavy on squats, leg presses, stationary bike, and even had a dry land ski machine we would use (which did that left right thing). But the stairs was my coachesí favorite punishment. By the time I got to collage my legs were so big I couldnít wear jeans. (Of course that was late 80ís early 90ís before the relaxed fit, and loose fit and what not.)

Now for the lesson learned, shortly after my first year in collage, on ESPN they showed this football player lugging a tree trunk on his shoulders as he climbed his football stadium staircase. Well I had the bright idea to incorporate weights in my staircase routine. (I still donít think itís a bad idea if you do it right maybe use a backpack or strap the weight on, maybe ankle weights or somethng) Well, I started just carrying a 25 pound in my arms then I moved up to 35 pounds. That is when I ended up and busting my ***, I ended up slipping and falling and since I was holding the weight I couldnít catch myself so 11 stitches to the noggin later, a sever bruises on my leg, and a sprained elbow. Still I was luck, the weight fell on my leg and missed my foot by inches, Iím sure if it hit my foot it would have broken it.

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08-14-2006, 02:49 PM
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Also, don't be discouraged if it doesn't happen right away, you're at an age where fast twitch fibres are VERY hard to develop, but it is possible.
Can you explain what a twitch fibre is? I've heard them mentioned before but don't know anything about them or how they develop.

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08-14-2006, 03:33 PM
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All great suggestions. I will take each into consideration. I have been running hills all week and doing some squats. Hopefully it pays off tonight.

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08-14-2006, 07:09 PM
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I think you might be a bit disappointed if you are hoping for some immediate gains. You should defiantly be working out for next year, get in shape this year and try and not to be a burden or get thrown off. Then next year you can reap the benefits from building your power. Explosive speed all comes from that first step hop, and getting your momentum going. Even if you don’t have the talent for overall top speed a big first step can make a tremendous difference in your game.

I only played one year of collage hockey because of a car crash, but as a freshman I was one of the faster players and might have had the fastest first step. If you’re serious you should look around for some stairs, and then learn to loath them.


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08-14-2006, 07:21 PM
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Not a physiology major or anything, just a competitive distance runner, but a friend gave me this info:

The basics are pretty simple. Essentially you have two types of muscle: Type I - slow twitch, and Type II - fast twitch. There are actually two types of type II in humans - IIa and IIx - but we're mostly concerned with the later.

Slow switch fibers are also known as "red" muscle, because they are densely packed with capillaries and receive a ton of blood flow. Slow twitch fibers are also full of mitochondria and myoglobin, which makes them efficient at generating ATP (think of ATP as the energy molecule, or a charge in the batteries). Because of the constant oxygen influx, and the high presence of mitochondria and myoglobin, red muscle is able to perpetually "recharge" in a way that fast twitch muscle cannot.

Fast twitch fibers or "glycolytic" fibers by comparison are low in mitochondria and myoglobin, and do not have nearly as many capillaries, thus their white appearance. While their oxidative capacity is limited, fast twitch fibers are loaded with glycogen and creatine phosphate, from which the majority of their exergy comes. Because they metabolize ATP very quickly through this anaerobic process, they are able to contract at a much higher velocity. Unfortunately, energy stores are rapidly depleated.

The "average" person is about 50/50 between fast twitch and slow twitch. Your postural muscles - such as those in your core, neck, and calves - tend to be more of the slow twitch variety. Your genetically predisposed to the relative amounts of fast or slow twitch muscle you have; elite distance sprinters can have up to 80% slow twitch, and likewise elite sprinters can have just as much fast twitch.

You can't "change" your genetic muscle physiology, but you can nurture what you have. Regardless of your predisposition, you have to train to see the full benifit of whatever your muscle makeup is. White muscle fibers can can acquire greater levels of mitochondria and myoglobin to become more fatigue resistant through training.

So to recap:

Fast twich: Contract fast, metabolize ATP quickly, use glycogen more than oxygen, not efficient for prolonged use.

Slow twitch: Contract slow, metabolize ATP slowly, dense with oxygen and capable of processing it efficiently into ATP.

You can tearn fast twitch into slow twitch but not the other way around, once the fast twitch fibres are gone, they are gone. It is much easier and more important to work on them as you are growing.

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08-15-2006, 07:52 AM
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I think you might be a bit disappointed if you are hoping for some immediate gains. You should defiantly be working out for next year, get in shape this year and try and not to be a burden or get thrown off...
So true! I worked hard with explosivines (extra practice in the gym) two years and I saw good results after first half of year. I can say that it is worth of it but it's very tiring to do those jump practices with weights. Tiring mentaly and hard for your joints (ankles and knees especially).

In Finland all of the juniors know how many stairs there is in their team arenas

Best way to get more speed and explosivines is to get own weight down and grove some muscles to legs. Easy, isn't it?


Last edited by BlackAdderI: 08-21-2006 at 05:36 AM.
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08-15-2006, 11:41 AM
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Thanks, raleh. That helped a lot.

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08-16-2006, 02:34 PM
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Fast twitch fibers or "glycolytic" fibers by comparison are low in mitochondria and myoglobin, and do not have nearly as many capillaries, thus their white appearance. While their oxidative capacity is limited, fast twitch fibers are loaded with glycogen and creatine phosphate, from which the majority of their exergy comes. Because they metabolize ATP very quickly through this anaerobic process, they are able to contract at a much higher velocity. Unfortunately, energy stores are rapidly depleated.
I'm guessing they also produce more heat when they metabolize, too. The more I think about this the more it explains why I fatigue and overheat so easily when I play.

In the past most of my conditioning exercises have been strength building in nature. I'm trying to achieve more of a balance now by introducing more cardio. Any advice on how to condition for endurance? (I'm kind of turning the discussion around 180 degrees).

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08-16-2006, 03:00 PM
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I wanted to say -- there are some good suggestions here on conditioning for explosive speed but no mention of technique. A great resource is Laura Stamm's Power Skating: http://www.humankinetics.com/product...sbn=0736037357

A few quick tips:
1. Your feet should be at a 45 degree angle to the direction you're traveling. Cross country skiers call the position heron toed -- your heels are turned in and your feet are splayed outward. Make sure to lean forward so the inside of your blade digs into the ice surface. You won't get far without traction.
2. Most of your power will come from deep knee bends followed by a full, powerful extension of your driving leg. Don't just move your feet quickly -- focus on pushing and gliding and repeating the process. Your legs should push back and to the side (perpendicular to the angle of your feet).
3. Pump your arms forward and back, not side to side. Your arms can add to your momentum. If they're moving side to side they're not helping and you're just wasting energy.

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08-16-2006, 04:04 PM
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raleh
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I'm guessing they also produce more heat when they metabolize, too. The more I think about this the more it explains why I fatigue and overheat so easily when I play.

In the past most of my conditioning exercises have been strength building in nature. I'm trying to achieve more of a balance now by introducing more cardio. Any advice on how to condition for endurance? (I'm kind of turning the discussion around 180 degrees).
Aside from cross country skiing, there's nothing like running to improve on your aerobic fitness. I guess the problem is you don't want to lose too much bulk if you're playing a pretty elite level of hockey. For me, I do about 110km of running a week and on Tuesdays and Thursdays do speed and speed endurance sessions with 3 or 4 weight sessions throughout. However, I weigh 145lbs at six feet so you'll probably want to do less slow long runs and more quick stuff. There's some great interval workouts you can do to improve on your speed endurance which is probably more up your alley than just straight running. Something like 6-8X400m with 1-2 minutes between reps. As I said earlier, the problem with too much straight cardio stuff is that you risk losing weight. If you can afford to lose weight then running is definately your best bet unless you live somewhere where you can ski on a daily basis. If not, maybe find some longer hills or a track and do some stuff on there. If you can avoid it, don't run on a treadmill, they suck haha.

Don't take my word as law though, because I'm not a super elite hockey player, I just do it for fun and my background is in middle distance running. I don't want to be leading you in the completely different direction so just keep in mind that this is my opinion and hopefully it helps!

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