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Improve Offensively

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Old
08-01-2006, 01:50 AM
  #1
Adam91
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Improve Offensively

I'm already an abover average offensive player but what can I do to become an exceptional one? how can I become more "tricky" 1on1? how can I have better offensive awareness? see the ice even better? etc. Are there any drills or visualization I can do to become an exceptional offensive player or is most of it god given??


Thanks for the help,

Adam

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08-01-2006, 10:50 AM
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sc37
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Keep your head up so you can see

For tricky one on one play...work on your skating, especially crossovers. Lotta times you can get an inept dman crossed up, or you can just beat them cause your faster.

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08-01-2006, 12:42 PM
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CaptBrannigan
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Simple trick to improve stickhandling (at least it worked for me): Cut a small length of pvc pipe and slide it over your stick so that when you hold the stick naturally, your top hand is holding the section of pipe over the stick. My friend gave me this tip and it has made me a better stickhandler. I think it has something to do your grip, and compensating for the pipe sliding a litle bit. I did this in my garage for about 20-30 minutes a day.

Shooting tip: Sit in a chair, feet flat on the floor and back up against the chair back. Shoot a puck, ball, etc. at a wall while sitting. This will enable you to get more power out of just your arms for your shot. This little trick greatly helped me.

You say you're above average so you're probably better than I was when I started doing these things, but maybe they could still help. They definitly won't hurt your game.

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08-01-2006, 01:41 PM
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Qui Gon Dave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twi View Post
Simple trick to improve stickhandling (at least it worked for me): Cut a small length of pvc pipe and slide it over your stick so that when you hold the stick naturally, your top hand is holding the section of pipe over the stick. My friend gave me this tip and it has made me a better stickhandler. I think it has something to do your grip, and compensating for the pipe sliding a litle bit. I did this in my garage for about 20-30 minutes a day.
Its interesting that you say the top hand (at end of stick) holds the pipe over the stick because I know of a similar exercise but it involves, in this case, holding the pipe over the stick with your lower hand. The point being that you get used to not holding the stick tightly with both hands all the time. You want a good grip of the stick with your top hand but when stickhandling, if you keep your lower hand looser, you can bring your hands closer together to control the puck further from the body without bending your back and when you space your hands out further apart on the stick, you can control the puck in close to your feet. If when you stickhandle, you keep both hands the same space apart, you will only feel 'comfortable' stickhandling the puck/ball a medium distance from the body. If you keep that same spacing between the hands and the puck moves further from you, you have to compensate by leaning forward, and if the puck is in your feet, you have to change your body position to a point where the whole of the blade of your stick will not be touching the ground, only a small bit will be, thus less control of the puck/ball. Hence the reason to get used to having a softer grip with your lower hand when you stickhandle.

As for the original post, I'm not entirely sure if I can give you any advice you wouldn't already be aware of if you are above average offensively, but I'll give it a shot, hopefully something here might be of use:

- Being tricky one on one. Top end speed here can be very useful, but more important is your ability to change speeds. If you can dip the shoulder one way and take two explosive strides the opposite way, you can create a little more space than if you just always try to go flat out (unless you have exceptional speed). If you can change direction at high speed, that will also help a lot, because you wont have to slow down for your turns, lots of players do. Also, in regards to skating, use shuffle steps when in close to someone to give you that shifty edge. I will assume you know what they are, but if not, feel free to ask (about that, or anything else here i may not make clear).

In regards to controlling the puck, if you play against the same people regularly, they will learn your tendancies and your moves, like a keeper would when facing players 1 on 1. If on a breakaway, you always approach from the same angle at the same speed then you might do the same thing (shoot to a certain side, make a certain deke). People get the hang of what you are doing given time, particularly if you successfully do what you are trying to do. You should practice a variety of moves for each situation you might find yourself in (against a d-man or goalie, etc). For example, when skating in alone on a goalie from the left hand side (im right handed, btw), i always used to fire a high wrist shot at the top right corner. Goalies will get used to this and anticipate it. So the next time i skate in, I might look to fake a wrist shot, make a move across the face of the goal and fire a wrist shot top left corner. Now the goalie might expect me to always shoot so he will come out further to take away the angle. So as i approach, i look to fake a shot and maybe deke to the backhand and use the extra space behind him. The same rule applies with defenders, if you use the same move all the time, they will get used to it, so learn some different variations. If you find yourself always throwing a specific deke (toe-drag, shoulder drop, dropping the puck to your skates and kicking it) learn to finish the move in different ways. So with a toe-drag for example, learn to do the TD and cut to the inside. then try doing the TD and starting to come inside before going back outside. then try doing the TD and pulling the puck through your legs from back to front. But having a variety of moves available to you in any situation can be very difficult to defend against.

- better offensive awareness. Two things i can say will help you here.
1. watching the people you play hockey with and learning their tendancies. Some people drive the net, some stand in front of it, some stand behind it. Some stay out on the boards looking for a one timer (like Kovalchuk on the PP), some will cross over behind you. Everyone is different. If you learn what everyone likes to do, you will be prepared for it and it will be easier to spot in a game. And if you know what your teammates are doing, you opponents might not, which gives you the advantage.
2. You didn't mention how good/comfortable you are with stickhandling. Particularly without looking at the puck while you stickhandle. If its an issue, just skate around with the puck on your stick without looking at it. It doesn't have to be anything fancy. As you build up your comfort with it, try changing the speed you are skating at and doing the same thing. And then try changing direction, generally building up the difficulty of technique in your skating while you stickhandle. You start slow and simple and build the speed and technicality of your skating, adding pivots, check stops, changes of direction. You dont have to do any fancy stickhandling moves (you can add them in later once you are comfortable with just the puck and your skating), just have control of the puck without looking at it, while skating as you would in different situations in a game. Once you can skate hard and still control the puck without looking at it, it frees your head up to look aorund at what goes on around you. And if you know what your teammates are doing in a game while moving at full speed with the puck, you can make a good choice of what to do with the puck.

I hope thats clear (i know i don't always do the best job of explaining things), if not I'll try clarify anything for you. Some of the best attacking players do have god-given talent, but a lot of it is desire. Just how good do you want to be? Are you willing to keep learning and improving, even if its only minor things? If its something you want badly enough, you will find a way to make it happen. whether that means working on your skating, stickhandling, understanding of the way you or someone else plays the game, how an opponant lines up against you when you skate towards them. There is always something else you can pay attention to. Just start slow and simple when learning new skills and build on that, bit by bit. If you keep building on an aspect of your game, eventually, you can become very good at it.

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08-01-2006, 04:05 PM
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CaptBrannigan
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Interesting note on that stickhandling thing. I will definitly have to try it that way, the reasons you've listed sound good to me and I could probably work on those things.

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08-01-2006, 05:31 PM
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Adam91
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Thanks for the help guys, I really apperciate and I will try all your tips once I get ride of my stupid cold

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08-02-2006, 12:50 AM
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As a defenseman, I find that the best offensive players that I have to cover are constantly moving on the ice, never staying in one spot for long, and they make smart decisions with the puck, be it a shot on goal or a good pass. Total pain in the a$$!

Also, the toughest player I face on a 1-on-1 is somebody who is coming in full bore really fast, but makes a lot of moves and fakes to try and get by me. So basically work on your skating, keep your head up, and see the ice. Once you get a feel for being a more offensive player, then that'll be your natural tendancy. Just my $.02.

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08-02-2006, 08:41 AM
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Pick up hockey helped me. We had a group that rented ice every week and would play around. When there is nothing on the line you can work on moves you normally would not. If you give up the puck not a big deal and there are no coaches to yell at you. You then incorporate that into you regular games as you get comfortable.

As a defenseman also as mentioned above speed is the tough thing to defend,a nd if you can improve your side to side movement that will help you.

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08-02-2006, 10:21 AM
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Hugh Madbrough
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I agree with puckboy, go to pickup and try out different things to see what works for you.

The stickhandling drills will be a big help as well.

I used to set up a chair in my dining room and stickhandle with a ball for hours. That may help you with hand speed.

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08-02-2006, 01:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qui Gon Dave View Post
Just start slow and simple when learning new skills and build on that, bit by bit. If you keep building on an aspect of your game, eventually, you can become very good at it.
IMO this is the most important bit of advice. Focus on learning one skill at at a time -- your focus will be better and it should be easier to see your progress. It's also easier to find specific advice on the internet. Instead of perfecting your shot, decide to work on your snap shot. Instead of just practicing your skating, focus on your left crossovers. Anyway, I've found this site to be very helpful: http://www.danbylsma.com/search/search.htm

As for developing your peripheral vision, I don't know if it's realistic to think you can have 20/20 all around you. You'll always see most clearly straight ahead of you. Your peripheral vision can tell the difference between light and dark but for most people the image will be fuzzy. Use that knowledge to keep track of your linemates and opposing defenders. As you prepare to pass the puck, look over at your team mate to see if he's open, whether his stick is on the ice and whether he's paying attention. Just be aware that you may never have the eyes of a chameleon. Know your limits and create ways of making the most of the vision you have.

I'm sure I could ramble on about hockey tips. I'm trying to work on my game, too. Feel free to ask any questions -- the more specific the better. And good luck.

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08-02-2006, 03:44 PM
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Adam91
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My stickhandling is probably the best part of my game. I practice specific drills at least 30 minutes a day but its with a smarthockey ball but it doesn't translate directly to the feel of a puck. Luckily I saved up a bunch of money and I'm ordering some synthetic ice which should be coming in pretty soon, that should really help me. I find that when I stickhandle with a smartball in my basement I have excellent hands but on the ice there just above average, so I think practicing with a puck who help me more quickly. Does anyone know when I should start seeing more results from using a puck? ( I see a fair bit of results from stickhandling with a ball).

Also. I feel that one of the main things that stops me from being an elite level player is my skating ability. I've only played hockey for 4 years so the kids who play AAA that I'm trying to catch up have alot of expierence on me. Since I live in British Columbia and its the summer there isn't alot of ice available. Luckily I live on a flat street and own a pair of rollerblades. My question to you guys is what are some specific drills I can to do on my blades to improve my icehockey skating?

Someone asked earlier if I'm willing to improve?
I'm very willing I spend almost all of my day, everyday doing something to improve my hockey skills.

Once again thanks for all the help guys

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08-02-2006, 04:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam91 View Post
My stickhandling is probably the best part of my game. I practice specific drills at least 30 minutes a day but its with a smarthockey ball but it doesn't translate directly to the feel of a puck. Luckily I saved up a bunch of money and I'm ordering some synthetic ice which should be coming in pretty soon, that should really help me. I find that when I stickhandle with a smartball in my basement I have excellent hands but on the ice there just above average, so I think practicing with a puck who help me more quickly. Does anyone know when I should start seeing more results from using a puck? ( I see a fair bit of results from stickhandling with a ball).

Also. I feel that one of the main things that stops me from being an elite level player is my skating ability. I've only played hockey for 4 years so the kids who play AAA that I'm trying to catch up have alot of expierence on me. Since I live in British Columbia and its the summer there isn't alot of ice available. Luckily I live on a flat street and own a pair of rollerblades. My question to you guys is what are some specific drills I can to do on my blades to improve my icehockey skating?

Someone asked earlier if I'm willing to improve?
I'm very willing I spend almost all of my day, everyday doing something to improve my hockey skills.


Once again thanks for all the help guys
You might want to take a power skating course over the summer.

How's your release and your accuracy? I find those are two very important things when it comes to offensive skills. You see plenty of guys who aren't great skaters score tons of goals because they pick corners and get their shot off quickly. Brett Hull comes to mind.

I'll say this much. You have the right attitude.

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08-02-2006, 07:03 PM
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Adam91
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I have an accurate shot but my relase could use some work. I'm working on it.

Anyone know any good drills for roller blading to practice for ice hockey?

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08-02-2006, 10:29 PM
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I believe I'm an average to slightly above average offenseman, depending on what you see. I have the vision and I have the knowledge of the game. I have explosive speed and quick feet, they could be quiker. I dont haev stickhandling, and I dont have that AMAZINGLY hard shot. But it is acurate and smart. I can beat someone to the outside (unless they have Joe thorton reach ) due to the fact I'm 5'3. I can come in and beat a goalie glove, and high blocker. A guy on my team can beat any goalie five hole. His shot is just so quick and acurate. Another guy on my team is a sniper and can hit any corner. I know what I have to work on and thats making my feet quicker, getting that stickhandling knowledge and skill. And getting a stronger shot. That would make me an above average offenseman.

What I do is tie a wieght to both ends of my stick and I curl that, I do that for 30 minutes and then do a quick foot drill. I have about 10 different sticks, each for their own purpose, and I place them like an obsticle course type. I start out at a certain point and run to the first stick, come to quick stop, turn, and explode. I do that until I cant get any better time then my time before. (yes that means have a stop watch lol).

I've never tried sitting in a chair and shooting, I will definetly have to try that. Also, to warm up before a game, I take a stick handling ball and stichandle and pass it around with your team mates. Or do it in any of your spare time.

I've just started these and I havent played since I started so I'll have to find out if it's working. I play Midget Major A in NJ, and my team is practicing with the Junior B team tomorrow. Lets find out if I can step it up to them huh?

Well, hope that mindless dribble helps. Remember, a couple miles in running a day wouldnt hurt. Eating fruits, vegetables, your protein and carbs and getting a good night sleep is RECOMENDED if you want to get to that next level. Some of us are prodagys. But NONE of us, get like that without hard work.

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08-02-2006, 10:39 PM
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By the way. If your coming in fast, pulling every move in the book, dosent mean the D man cant stop ya. All he has to do is stick his stick in the middle of your stick path, youll look down or not, which ever you usually do, (for me its look down HA) but he'll just stand you up. One on one I found it easy for me if you just look at the logo...so...do what Ovechkin does, keep your body away from his. I've looked at alot of his clips and some of his moves are simple. Noteably the kick with his foot and dipping the shoulder, and he waits for the goalie to make the move and the goalie does, and then goes back in position and then he snipes that same spot. Also he'll come in on about a 60 degree angle and see if the goalie anticipates him going all the way across and then does a quick cut and slides the puck to the other side. Just some noteable things. Watching the pro's and practicing those moves, will help your game also.

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08-02-2006, 11:34 PM
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EmptyNetter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam91 View Post
Anyone know any good drills for roller blading to practice for ice hockey?
I'm taking a hockey skills class and we've been doing a lot of figure 8's to practice our crossovers. Set up some cones if it helps or if there's an open basketball court you can skate around the foul shot circle. Skate 3 complete circles clockwise, then move to the next circle and skate 3 counterclockwise. Your outside foot should always cross in front of the inside foot. Start with a wider circle and once you feel comfortable you can collapse the circle. Start with front crossovers and then switch to back crossovers. Don't forget to try this with your stick and a ball once you feel comfortable enough with it. Stickhandle in front of you, then try it at your side as though you're preparing to shoot.

Practice switching from skating forward to backward. Skate around the circle, pivoting from back to forward so that you're always facing the same point -- imagine your teammate's behind the net waiting for you to get open so he can set you up for the one timer.

Work on side crossovers. Our instructor has us hold our sticks horizontally until we find our balance. Once you're comfortable, move the ball side to side as though you're playing either at the point or behind the net looking to make a pass.

Just keep in mind that being able to change direction at a moment's notice will help you to shake a defender and open up scoring chances where there were none before. Remember that the sharper the turn and the quicker you can reach full speed, the easier it will be to break free and the more time and space your create for yourself.

Hope that helps.

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08-02-2006, 11:53 PM
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Okay, I'm no skilled whiz kid, but I score a lot of goals despite these shortcomings:

1.) Any goalie worth his salt can stop my slapper
2.) I'm not a clever stick handler
3.) I'm not great on one-on-one battling (but improving)

So, how do I score?
1.) I hit the offensive blueline at breakneck speed, and I don't go wide. I go to the net, and I get there before anyone else...on-sides. I hit the blueline with my teammates, but with much higher acceleration and velocity. It's like being a receiver in football: beat your defender to where the good pass will be, and run a strong pattern. Break away from the pack and hide for a split-second at center ice...and then fly in there! I go straight to the net, because when I get the pass, I can shoot wherever I like: if I go wide, the goalie will just shift and cut down the angle.
2.) Mix it up: I never shoot for the same spot or make the same move on the goalie or defender twice, unless I think that it would mess them up.
3.) Back hand, Back hand, Back hand...while my team mates rev up on their slappers, I'm off on my own going back hand: and I always warm up my goalie with backhands. I'm a former goalie, and a backhander is far harder to stop than a slapshot.
4.) Practice bad-angle shooting. I don't care about trying to blow one past the goalie from the slot when he's already set. I go for the bad shot that hits the top corner while the keeper is moving, but not really believing in your shot. I can go roof on goalies from stupidly bad angles without looking because I know what the angles are from my position. Know these angles better than the goalie knows them, and you'll beat them every time. Remember, the puck isn't released from what your eyes see: it's released from your stick - that determines the angle.
5.) Be a defensively dedicated player. Opposing defenses work harder against the razzle-dazzle skill types, but don't know what to do as much with two-way players. Offense-only guys are predictable, and easier to shut down. Two-way guys are chaotic.
6.) Chaos: one on one with the goalie - do NOT be slick or smooth. They know the moves. Stagger step, be awkward, anything...it's all about selling the goalie a LIE to get him to move.


Last edited by Magnus Fulgur: 08-02-2006 at 11:59 PM.
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08-03-2006, 09:25 AM
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Qui Gon Dave
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Not got much time to comment on whats been said recently, but here are a few links for people who want some stickhandling info:

Link 1

Link 2

Link 3

Plenty to get your head around if you have the time. And the Sean Skinner instructional videos/dvds seem a good purchase, based on the ones I've seen so far. Not seen all his releases but I imagine they will all be of a similar standard. But aside from that, the most important individual skill to work on is your skating. If you improve your skating, it will help you improve the aspects of your game like stickhandling, passing, shooting, checking, etc, everything else will be a little easier.

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08-03-2006, 09:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam91 View Post
I'm already an abover average offensive player but what can I do to become an exceptional one? how can I become more "tricky" 1on1? how can I have better offensive awareness? see the ice even better? etc. Are there any drills or visualization I can do to become an exceptional offensive player or is most of it god given??


Thanks for the help,

Adam

There are some great tips here.
The things I've tried are:
Setup a mini obstacle course to stick handle through while keeping your head up. I would do this in my basement when the Wings were on. I would try to pay attention to the game while stick handling through and around cups, bottles and blocks.
I would also practice stick handling while keeping my head up while standing on one leg, alternating every couple of seconds.
This greatly helped my stickhandling on the ice.
I also try to practice my shot by picking corners and shooting over and over again.
When I was a student I had a job in a warehouse by myself preparing orders. There was quite a bit of downtime in between loads so I brought a hockey stick to work and I would practice shooting a roll of packing tape at a skid full of unmade cardboard boxes. The skid was almost regulation net size so it was perfect.
After doing this all summer long I couldn't believe how much better my shot and accuracy was come hockey season. I scored 31 goals in 25 games in the mens beer league I played in. I had never scored that much in my life. My shot has never been that hard but through this practice it became extremely accurate.

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08-03-2006, 11:32 AM
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Adding to the pvc tube drill... Only use your lower hand to help support the weight of the stick or when making hard moves, all the puckhandling should come from your top hand.

As far as peripheral, all you need is to see movement and preferably color. If you watch and know what your teammates and other people on ice/roller are probably going to do then you can assume where the play is going.

For example, I was playing roller this past week and stole the puck from inside our zone. I know that there was two players in deep and one guy that I stole the puck from. In my peripheral vision I saw the other opposing player(to my right, the direction i was about to turn) and saw one of my teammates start streaking the other way(to my left, the opposite of the way i was turning). Knowing the general area of all the players on their team and the one on my team that I needed to know I made a soft no-look pass and hit him on his tape. Which led to a breakaway.

It's not soo much on how well you can see with your peripheral vison, it's the information you can decipher and put to use as quickly as possible.

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08-03-2006, 12:50 PM
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Some guys have already posted some pretty good stuff on here congrats!

As a player for ohhh 18 years now (11 on defence and 7 on forward) ive theorized and tested this topic quite alot. Theres too many areas to address so I'll try and focus on what I feel to be most important.

My conclusions~

1~ Skating with your head up- This is the most important thing you can do in the game of hockey. If you cant skate/stickhandle/deke without putting your head down you will never reach your potential. WHY? Because your potential is automatically being limited to your periferal vision. Think about it...you expect to "see" the whole ice when your focus is on the puck?? No, sorry guys. You gotta use your focus on everything on the ice and your periferal vision for the puck only.

2~ Dont skate around the ice wishing for the puck- Always skate around the ice thinking about what your going to do WHEN you get the puck. Analysing the players around you and the ice is whats going to help you decide your "move". Sometimes deciding to be the passer is the best move. Giving up the puck because your check got on you quickly is a poor move. Instead you should have been making the give-and-go pass to your pal for the goal.

3~ Skate and Pass to open ice- Getting the puck and barging straight to the net will prove to be ineffective. Instead try skating to open ice. This buys you and your teamates more time to setup and create a play. This also debilitates the defences ability to read and react to the play, which will open up lanes/gaps for you and your team.

4~ Build your arsenal- These moves (toe-drags, spinoramas) that spezza, crosby, lecavlier...ect.. pull dont come out of nowhere. Practice these moves a couple at a time. Recognizing when its appropriate for what move is key. Once these moves become second-nature you will learn to setup the defenceman for your favorites.

5~ Practice- We all know it can suck sometimes. But practicing brings conditioning and confidence bot mentally and physically. Just do it, and do it good...no half a$$ed stuff. Practice at home too. I usually do alot of shooting at home cause lets face it, theres not much else to do. Think about the angles and where your weight is going when you shoot. Theres alot of math and physics behind a good shot...just think about it

6~ Last tips- Going full speed isnt always the best. For one it forces the defence to do the same. Slow down...let the defence try to close the gap, then burst on him. Secondly you teamates will appreciate it. It allows them to become the guys who cut across the ice at full speed againt your slow checker. Make them part of the play. I hated being the guy making the break-out pass to the team mate going full speed. I'd have to go faster them him just to catch up to the play which doesnt make sence all of the time.

- Doing the obvious is well....obvious. Give your opponents some mental credit in their abilities to read a play. MIX IT UP.

- If your going to shoot then SHOOT. Too often do I see little wussy shots when they should be shooting to score. Shoot HARD and often. Wrist shots and snap shots included. Snap shots being my personal favorite.

Ill stop here for now unless anyone else is interested in my theories

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08-04-2006, 01:52 AM
  #22
hfboardsuser
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1. Take advantage of your surroundings. The boards are going to help you, the sticks and skates of your teammates and opposition will help you, even the glass will help you if you use it properly.

2. Don't back down from crashing the net. I don't understand why players aren't willing to pay the price in front. It's not that hard, and not that scary.

3. Backcheck. Yes, it will help you become an elite offensive forward. You'll be someone your coach trusts to put out in more situations, which means you'll have more ice time and therefore more chances to manufacture offense.

4. Puck possession, puck possession, puck possession. It's the skill that put Orr above anyone else and it's the skill that's kept Ryan Smyth in the upper echelon of LWs. Your opponent cannot score if he doesn't have the puck/ball. Work on keeping that bad boy, whether it's through drills that refine how well you protect the puck with your body or simply through outskating everyone.

5. Improve your release. The goalie can't stop it if he doesn't see you let it go.

6. Improve your backhand. Howe told Gretz to work on his, and look how it paid off for him.

7. Improve your slapper. Accuracy, speed, power, release, everything. Goalies don't usually expect a bomb from the blueline on the rush. See: Wayne Gretzky, 1979-1999.

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08-04-2006, 01:30 PM
  #23
waffledave
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I have a little move that always, ALWAYS works...At least until it gets figured out. But nobody ever sees it comming and it surprises everyone.

When I'm going in 1 on 1 and I want to deke out the other guy, I just flick the puck ever so softly and bank it off the inside of his thigh. It takes practice to get it perfectly, but honestly...NOBODY sees it coming. You just have to do it fast...Because if it looks like you'll shoot they're going to close their legs. I just skate by, juggle the puck a bit and ping, bank it off his thigh. Every time he doesn't know where it goes and I've mastered it so it ends up back on my stick by the time I blow by him. The key is a quick release and accuracy.

Most of the time, the guy looks the wrong way for the puck. That gives me the split second I need to blow past him.

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08-04-2006, 01:34 PM
  #24
waffledave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Bugg View Post
1. Take advantage of your surroundings. The boards are going to help you, the sticks and skates of your teammates and opposition will help you, even the glass will help you if you use it properly.
I do this all the time. I bank the puck off everything. The boards are my friend. They've helped me blow past d-men all the time.

I scored a beauty the other day...I had the puck in the corner...Looking to pass and I noticed the goalie was just slightly off the post. I banked it off the back of his leg and in.

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08-04-2006, 07:49 PM
  #25
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Keep your feet moving, go where you think the puck is going to go and shoot the puck.

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