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Sticks. Wood or Composite

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01-05-2007, 10:28 PM
  #1
YogiCanucks
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Sticks. Wood or Composite

Sorry if this has already been done.

Personally I prefer my wooden stick even tho I can shoot better with my composite one (not to mention how much lighter it is) but I just like the feel of an accual wooden stick.

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01-06-2007, 12:27 AM
  #2
Doctor Hook
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Composites definitely add some more mustard to my shots. I prefer the lightness as well. I'll rock a wood backup (or even an aluminum), but my gamer is composite material.

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01-06-2007, 01:17 AM
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Jawsh
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I just find the feel of a composite stick is supreme. When I try to take a shot with a wooden stick it feels like the shaft does not flex and the blade does, and it sends my shot accuracy way off. It is terrible, not to mention the weight of them. Composite sticks are designed for hockey and wood sticks are just glued together.

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01-06-2007, 03:18 AM
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oileral
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once you go composite you won't go back. (unless you're some kind of bruising defenseman, or something to that sort )

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01-06-2007, 05:05 AM
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dabid
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Wood, sher-wood, but I suck at hockey and cant even play cause I'm out of shape.

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01-06-2007, 10:27 AM
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Slick
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I prefer my wood stick. Part of it is I haven't been playing long enough to feel I really developed a good shot, so I am using my wood shot until I feel confident in it. I have a much easier time accepting passes and stick handling with my wood stick, and that's more important to me right now.

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01-06-2007, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oileral View Post
once you go composite you won't go back. (unless you're some kind of bruising defenseman, or something to that sort )
I'll second that. I can't see myself using a woodie anymore. The composites are superior in so many ways. Shot release, stickhandling, balance, lightness.................. and a consistant flex and flex point.

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01-06-2007, 12:34 PM
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TBLfan
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I prefer composites but don't mind wood. As long as the stick is balanced and has a nice curve I like it... The problem is that wood goes soft a lot sooner than a composite does. Breaking of sticks is all relative.

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01-06-2007, 01:04 PM
  #9
Slick
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Actually I did some tests on both sticks in one of the engineering labs at my school (UMass) for a junior project. My data showed the composites were weaker. I used an Easton Synergy against a Sherwood.

Here is the Synergy (composite)



Here is the Sherwood:


Last edited by Slick: 01-07-2007 at 01:09 PM.
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01-06-2007, 03:07 PM
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TBLfan
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weaker in what aspect?

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01-06-2007, 07:08 PM
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crashlanding
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slick View Post
Actually I did some tests on both sticks in one of the engineering labs at my school (UMass) for a junior project. The composites were weaker. I used an Easton Synergy against a Sherwood.

Here is the Synergy (composite)



Here is the Sherwood:
You really have to give a lot more information about your test for these graphs to have any value.

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01-06-2007, 10:17 PM
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I'd been a stalwart wood man until christmas came around and i got an ST. Greatest stick i've ever owned. Composites truly are amazing. I still like wood sticks though. They just seem to allow me to hack and slash without worrying about destroying a 250 dollar investment.

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01-07-2007, 12:10 AM
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YogiCanucks
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Originally Posted by Berger_4_ View Post
They just seem to allow me to hack and slash without worrying about destroying a 250 dollar investment.
That is accually very true. When I have my composite stick I'm very weary of it and I'm always check if it has a crack or anything. While with my wooden stick I'm just focussing on hockey and I'm not afraid to throw my stick near the skates of opponents.

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01-07-2007, 10:17 AM
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stifrontman
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Composite for sure.

There's just so much more tactile feedback.

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01-07-2007, 12:08 PM
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Slick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
weaker in what aspect?
Quote:
Originally Posted by crashlanding View Post
You really have to give a lot more information about your test for these graphs to have any value.
Sorry, just gave some vague graphs because I didn't think anyone would really be interested. I initially wanted to run an impact test, but the strength of the sticks actually broke the pin on the impact hammer. I decided to run a three point bending test (I actually had to use the schools high power one to get them to fracture, the normal ones in lab only cause them to flex). The three point bending test seems to best simulate the force the stick sees during a slapshot (as the stick will flex/bend before it breaks).

Here is an example of how the test is set up, notice the two bars it is resting on to allow the flexing. The force is applied (onto a piece of metal I put on the stick to more evenly distribute the load) and the stick flexes until fracture.



Finally, once fracture happens:


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01-07-2007, 12:33 PM
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TBLfan
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there's a couple things wrong with your test. Assuming that you're using the same flex, you didn't use the entire stick... Composite sticks often don't have the same flex throughout the shaft and have a "kick point" where the flex is concentrated. Also, sticks aren't made to be bended on a constant bend, that's not how a stick flexes in a slap shot. During a slap shot the energy from the strain of the bending stick is released. Here you didn't release the energy so you didn't accurately gauge the stick in test reflective of a hockey shot. Composite sticks don't break on shots... well at least ones that aren't already damaged. They break on slashes and being stepped on which create little fractures, often they sheer off during shots due to the damage already done.

Now I'm not saying that in game situations that composites break more easily but the way they break isn't accurately shown.

Also, I bet the wood was dead and non-responsive before it actually broke because at some level the wood had to fracture before the multilayer broke completely.

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01-07-2007, 01:09 PM
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Granted the test isn't going to be perfect. I didn't have many sticks to break, infact I only had one wood stick to use and one Synergy that was donated to me for the test by the UMass hockey dept. There are only a few machines to be used for testing, and I had a limited amount of time to do them. I picked the machine that would best simulate a slapshot, I couldn't simulate all the variables such as a slash because the impact tester couldn't handle the force needed.

Also, you can't fit an entire stick into that machine, nor do I think using the whole stick would have change the test results at all. I did the best with what I had, and from what I've seen I believe wood sticks are stronger. Perhaps if I had more time for research I could come up with a better test, but this was a project for junior year.

I'm posting my results for others to take as they may, not as the end all-be all proof one is better than the other.

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01-07-2007, 01:18 PM
  #18
TBLfan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slick View Post
Granted the test isn't going to be perfect. I didn't have many sticks to break, infact I only had one wood stick to use and one Synergy that was donated to me for the test by the UMass hockey dept. There are only a few machines to be used for testing, and I had a limited amount of time to do them. I picked the machine that would best simulate a slapshot, I couldn't simulate all the variables such as a slash because the impact tester couldn't handle the force needed.

Also, you can't fit an entire stick into that machine, nor do I think using the whole stick would have change the test results at all. I did the best with what I had, and from what I've seen I believe wood sticks are stronger. Perhaps if I had more time for research I could come up with a better test, but this was a project for junior year.

I'm posting my results for others to take as they may, not as the end all-be all proof one is better than the other.
That's more than fine, didn't mean to come off as to disregard your tests or point. But I wanted to bring to light that it wasn't accurately testing the strain put while playing hockey. There is younger players and maybe some nieve people on this board that might take your word as gold because you have graphs and pictures. I meant no disrespect because I knew as a project for school that you didn't have enough money to test all elements and that in fact, that I know of, no one has done a test that fully test both wood sticks and composite for strengths and weaknesses.

But to me it's pretty apparent that a wood stick goes dead after a short while and you lose velocity and accuracy. All in all even though high-end wood sticks are a lot cheaper but you have to replace them more. The price ends up about equal over about a year, maybe even less for the composite. Of course this all depends on how hard you are on your sticks, what sticks you buy and how picky you are about dead blades/flex.

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01-07-2007, 01:31 PM
  #19
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composites

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Old
01-07-2007, 03:09 PM
  #20
Slick
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Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
That's more than fine, didn't mean to come off as to disregard your tests or point. But I wanted to bring to light that it wasn't accurately testing the strain put while playing hockey. There is younger players and maybe some nieve people on this board that might take your word as gold because you have graphs and pictures. I meant no disrespect because I knew as a project for school that you didn't have enough money to test all elements and that in fact, that I know of, no one has done a test that fully test both wood sticks and composite for strengths and weaknesses.

But to me it's pretty apparent that a wood stick goes dead after a short while and you lose velocity and accuracy. All in all even though high-end wood sticks are a lot cheaper but you have to replace them more. The price ends up about equal over about a year, maybe even less for the composite. Of course this all depends on how hard you are on your sticks, what sticks you buy and how picky you are about dead blades/flex.
I agree with you 100%, I'm sorry if I also came across snippy. I'm glad you pointed out the flaws in the test so everyone knows the the test was only a test for one type of stress, and does not account for many of the variables, I didn't do a good job of saying that. I also didn't think about the kick points, so your points are helpful to me as well.

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01-07-2007, 03:11 PM
  #21
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As much as I like wood sticks, I find the blade get's completely effed up way too fast. That's why I use composite over wood.

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01-07-2007, 05:44 PM
  #22
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The most I've spent on a stick is 10 dollars. (Wood of course).

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01-07-2007, 06:19 PM
  #23
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Once you go composite you don't go back.

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Old
01-07-2007, 06:23 PM
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composite, CCM/RBK shafts, sakic easton blades.

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01-07-2007, 06:24 PM
  #25
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Originally Posted by JM47 View Post
Once you go composite you don't go back.
Thats actually true. I went back to wood, and found them chipping and not lasting as long so I went back to composite again.

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