HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > NHL Western Conference > Pacific Division > Edmonton Oilers
Notices

The positives of playing/living in Edmonton.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
03-08-2007, 03:07 PM
  #26
bleed_oil
Registered User
 
bleed_oil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,833
vCash: 500
Guys dont buy into all this nonsense about lifestyle. hockey players (just like everybody else in this world) care about one thing for the most part... money. Give them it, and they would spend a lifetime just about anywhere. Edmonton bad? Anybody here ever worked the winter for either Shell Albian Sands or CNRL in Fort Mac? -40 out, 1 hour 10 min drive to work in pitch black and you have to get to work at 7 am.... then you have something to complain about. Not some whiny hockey player who lives in a gorgeous condo on Saskatchewan Drive
Anyways thats all beyond the point...

bleed_oil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 03:11 PM
  #27
jumptheshark
Give the dog a bone
 
jumptheshark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: hf retirement home
Country: United Nations
Posts: 52,292
vCash: 500
I think it is the winter that kills most of the enjoyment of edmonton. That and the fact being a hockey player is like living in a very small fish bowl during the season.

__________________
trying to fend off exwife number 2
45000/010113
GO SHARKS GO
jumptheshark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 03:18 PM
  #28
Lanny MacDonald*
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Tuvalu
Posts: 4,457
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rec28 View Post
Demonstrably false.

Would you agree that Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver boast a more affluent population than Edmonton, Regina or Saskatoon?
Interesting numbers. Can't say I agree with them in any shape or form, having witnessed several funding drives first hand. I'd like to know what they classified as "cultural" spending. Let's just say that you tend to raise more money, and see more support, from places like Scottsdale rather than Avondale. I always equate it to trick or treating as kid. Do you go to the neighbourhoods where everyone drives Mercedes, or do you go to the neighbourhoods where everyone drives Kias?

Lanny MacDonald* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 03:22 PM
  #29
Soundwave
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 24,096
vCash: 500
dp

Soundwave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 03:23 PM
  #30
Soundwave
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 24,096
vCash: 500
The main thing is just the winter really. That can be tough if you're not used to the cold weather. Otherwise, it's quite nice during the spring/summer/fall.

The fishbowl comment lets be honest ... that's part of being a pro athlete. I doubt (infact I know) that's the hockey players in Montreal and Toronto also basically live under a microscope. You can't walk down the street without being recoginized.

But so what? It's the same with the NBA or NFL or MLB. You think LeBron James can go anywhere in Cleveland and not be stopped by fans wanting an autograph? I think actually NFL/NBA/MLB players deal with this better. It's part of the gig, and they know it.

Hockey players who live in the US too long think they're entitled to privacy because no one in the US cares about their sport, lol.

Soundwave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 03:26 PM
  #31
rec28
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Vancouver Island
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,982
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to rec28
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Iconoclast View Post
Interesting numbers. Can't say I agree with them in any shape or form, having witnessed several funding drives first hand. I'd like to know what they classified as "cultural" spending. Let's just say that you tend to raise more money, and see more support, from places like Scottsdale rather than Avondale. I always equate it to trick or treating as kid. Do you go to the neighbourhoods where everyone drives Mercedes, or do you go to the neighbourhoods where everyone drives Kias?
Well, as I understand it, these numbers are a measurement of personal spending on the arts (i.e. consumption of cultural goods and services), as opposed to civic/provincial/state support or funding drives. I think, though, that we may not be using the same definition of arts and culture. I get the distinct impression that you have high-society Opera/Symphony types of things in mind, whereas I'm including everything from festivals, live theatre, art galleries, museums, etc along with Opera, Ballet, Symphony et al in my definition.

And growing up, the guy on my block with the mansion and expensive cars was an orthodontist. He gave out toothbrushes at Halloween.


Last edited by rec28: 03-08-2007 at 03:32 PM.
rec28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 03:40 PM
  #32
Boilers*
 
Boilers*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,165
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rec28 View Post
Well, as I understand it, these numbers are a measurement of personal spending on the arts (i.e. consumption of cultural goods and services), as opposed to civic/provincial/state support or funding drives. I think, though, that we may not be using the same definition of arts and culture. I get the distinct impression that you have high-society Opera/Symphony types of things in mind, whereas I'm including everything from festivals, live theatre, art galleries, museums, etc along with Opera, Ballet, Symphony et al in my definition.

And growing up, the guy on my block with the mansion and expensive cars was an orthodontist. He gave out toothbrushes at Halloween.
Good thing he wasn't a proctologist?

Boilers* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 03:41 PM
  #33
rec28
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Vancouver Island
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,982
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to rec28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bloodsport View Post
Good thing he wasn't a proctologist?
LOL

<shudder>

rec28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 03:43 PM
  #34
Ceres
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 42
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by graveyardshift View Post
I think it is the winter that kills most of the enjoyment of edmonton. That and the fact being a hockey player is like living in a very small fish bowl during the season.
I'm sorry, I just had to comment on this. The fact that a HOCKEY PLAYER who doesn't like the winter is interesting to me. Hockey players who likely grew up being on a sheet of ICE most of the time care about cold weather (leaving aside that Edmonton weather is not as bad as everyone says)?

Some people don't like to be in a fish bowl during the season, but others relish being worshiped like a god by the fans. I think it's a toss up which is which.

Ceres is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 03:48 PM
  #35
oilerfanatic
Registered User
 
oilerfanatic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Siberia
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,183
vCash: 500
ahahhahahah hockey players not being able to bare the winter?...these guys were raised in small cold towns during their youth...now all of a sudden they hate winter and think they deserve to live in LA and phoenix?...give me a break...

oilerfanatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 04:36 PM
  #36
jumptheshark
Give the dog a bone
 
jumptheshark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: hf retirement home
Country: United Nations
Posts: 52,292
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceres View Post
I'm sorry, I just had to comment on this. The fact that a HOCKEY PLAYER who doesn't like the winter is interesting to me. Hockey players who likely grew up being on a sheet of ICE most of the time care about cold weather (leaving aside that Edmonton weather is not as bad as everyone says)?

Some people don't like to be in a fish bowl during the season, but others relish being worshiped like a god by the fans. I think it's a toss up which is which.
well before moving to Buffalo I lived in Edmonton for a few years and I think the weather is as bad as everyone says it is. I think the comment he was making was more about the fact that elsewhere with only a few acceptions, it is a lot colder in Edmonton then in many other places where hockey is played. And some hockey WIVES tend not to like the cold.

jumptheshark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 04:46 PM
  #37
Behind Enemy Lines
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3,765
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Iconoclast View Post
Interesting numbers. Can't say I agree with them in any shape or form, having witnessed several funding drives first hand. I'd like to know what they classified as "cultural" spending. Let's just say that you tend to raise more money, and see more support, from places like Scottsdale rather than Avondale. I always equate it to trick or treating as kid. Do you go to the neighbourhoods where everyone drives Mercedes, or do you go to the neighbourhoods where everyone drives Kias?
Tons of arts research out there. The article mentioned has a pretty broad take on defining cultural spending. It includes home electronics which skews it. But there is a very solid base for attending cultural events as well, see below:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...rtainment/home


In 2005 Albertans paid admissions totalling more than $140-million to the live performing arts — with Calgary leading all major Canadian cities with a figure of $139 a head — almost twice the $81-million Albertans spent on hockey and football games.

At the same time that individual Albertans are forking out for the arts, the provincial government's assistance to the sector has been stingy. For example, a Hill Strategies nationwide survey of government spending on culture between 1992-93 and 2002-03 discovered that Alberta's per capita inflation-adjusted expenditure on the arts declined by more than 27 per cent, to $47 from $65 — lower even than that of Newfoundland and Labrador ($63), Saskatchewan ($72) and Prince Edward Island ($62).

A really great website for Canada:
http://www.hillstrategies.com/resour...1000126&lang=0


There is a big difference between arts philanthropy in the U.S. and Canada. In the U.S., there is a stronger history of philanthropic giving by the super rich (Carnegie, Getty, etc.). Canada with its welfare state model is historically more tied to government support. Howeve the fundraising need in both countries try to target wealthier individual donors because they have the $. Hopefully though the fund raising efforts help the cultural organization to deliver programs for broad audiences.

As mentioned above, the Alberta government falls wells short in funding and supporting arts and culture. Despite the economic reality bolded. Kline would rather throw money at new hockey rinks that support a sector that has more populous benefits - real (economic, roi) and intangible (inclusiveness, learning, creativity).

Bloodsports' comment, LOL!

Behind Enemy Lines is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 04:57 PM
  #38
vb
Registered User
 
vb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Miami, FL
Country: United States
Posts: 3,257
vCash: 500
I have to say the weather in Edmonton is over blown. Most of Canada is freezing by January and February - Toronto might be the worst of all. The wind and humdity there make -10 feel like -50.

Things I like about Edmonton are:
- traffic is easy to get through
- cheap city to live in
- sense of community and friendly people

One thing that really needs improvement is the design of housing. A lot of those new developments are ugly; and I can understand how a visitor to the city would not want to live in them.

vb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 05:07 PM
  #39
Fourier
Registered User
 
Fourier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Waterloo Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 8,655
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by vb View Post

Things I like about Edmonton are:
...
- cheap city to live in
...
If your a hockey player yes, but at least by Canadian standards it is
quite expensive.

Fourier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 06:03 PM
  #40
Tyrolean
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Country: Austria
Posts: 6,171
vCash: 500
Negatives:

Poor air connections.
Brutal Winters
Off the mainstream of entertainment tours and world focus.
Not a cosmopolitan city
Lacks variety in products and things to do generally.

Advantages:

Being a backwater means it is off the terrorist's target list.
Clean and non polluted environment (though global warming and the Oilsands may alter this in the future).
Low cost of living (until now when the Oil prices have driven home prices up)
Relatively small and compact size
People are friendly and there is less crime than major cities.
Vibrant economy
Strong source of Canadian hockey players. Hockey is beloved here.
Traffic is not a horrendous problem in rush hour.

The positives outweigh the negatives by a long shot.

Tyrolean is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 06:13 PM
  #41
jumptheshark
Give the dog a bone
 
jumptheshark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: hf retirement home
Country: United Nations
Posts: 52,292
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundwave View Post
The main thing is just the winter really. That can be tough if you're not used to the cold weather. Otherwise, it's quite nice during the spring/summer/fall.

The fishbowl comment lets be honest ... that's part of being a pro athlete. I doubt (infact I know) that's the hockey players in Montreal and Toronto also basically live under a microscope. You can't walk down the street without being recoginized.

But so what? It's the same with the NBA or NFL or MLB. You think LeBron James can go anywhere in Cleveland and not be stopped by fans wanting an autograph? I think actually NFL/NBA/MLB players deal with this better. It's part of the gig, and they know it.

Hockey players who live in the US too long think they're entitled to privacy because no one in the US cares about their sport, lol.
When it comes hockey and Edmonton I think it was one of the toughest places to play hockey, either you are loved or hated and either way it is hard to go about personal life when you are so high profiled. As for the weather, the comment was more about the fact that we are talking about not just the player, but also his kids and wife and how they react to the cold weather.

jumptheshark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 06:16 PM
  #42
Hemskyfanboy83
Registered User
 
Hemskyfanboy83's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 6,463
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Iconoclast View Post
That would be the coolest. Lots of time to work on most players' second passion... golf.
I really shouldn't but I couldn't help but laugh. A Flames fan makes fun of my team and I laugh. Props to you sir.

Anyways the biggest positives I can think of are

If you play well, you are treated as a GOD. We basically worship the ground guys like Gretzky walk on. I would love that feeling of being appreciated. It would also be unreal to play here in the playoffs.

Another big positive is that you can breathe. I have been to Toronto and it is a great city, but man is it ever dirty. Their air sucks and isn't fresh at all.

I also like the people there much better. I live in Vancouver now which is a far nicer city then Edmonton and has all kinds of mountains and lakes etc. I prefer Edmonton though as everybody here is always in such a rush and in bad moods. It is a little to hectic for me and I like the more laid back Edmonton. More of a community feeling there.

I have been all over North America and Edmonton, Montreal, Victoria and Coeur D'laine (sp? it is in Idaho IIRC) are at the top of my list ahead of Vancouver, Toronto, LA.

Hemskyfanboy83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 06:58 PM
  #43
vb
Registered User
 
vb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Miami, FL
Country: United States
Posts: 3,257
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourier View Post
If your a hockey player yes, but at least by Canadian standards it is
quite expensive.
I don't know about that, every other province has PST and housing is still a lot cheaper than Vancouver and Toronto.

vb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 07:04 PM
  #44
jumptheshark
Give the dog a bone
 
jumptheshark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: hf retirement home
Country: United Nations
Posts: 52,292
vCash: 500
For most things Vancouver and Toronto and Montreal are more expensive then Edmonton--atleast the last time I was back in Edmonton was about 95/96--and it was alot cheaper then Vancouver

jumptheshark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 07:37 PM
  #45
HuMz
Registered User
 
HuMz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Calgary, Canada
Posts: 2,441
vCash: 50
Not sure if its been mentioned but general fact that Alberta is going through a boom is a huge plus if you have money.

If they make the right decisions through real estate they could set themselves up financially for long after they retire.

HuMz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 07:46 PM
  #46
CanadianCommie
Cold North Comrade
 
CanadianCommie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Sherwood Park, AB
Country: Canada
Posts: 10,566
vCash: 500
The only way I'd believe that Edmonton is a terrible place to live and play in, from an NHLers perspective would be via a comprehensive survey.

Otherwise, we're just bantering about conjecture and a handful of media pundits claiming whatever they think is true.

I think that our constant examination of their rants -none of which provide any substantial proof- just makes it more difficult for us, as fans, to see the more reasonable motivators behind players' decisions.

Having said that, so far there have been some interesting points for and against Edmonton as a community and city. My own personal view is that Edmonton's potential shortcomings are hardly devastating enough to deter hockey players, other than the most selective or the prima-donnas of the league who want it their way or no way at all. Admittedly, Edmonton is a blue-collar city; although we have a high level of affluence, and no shortage of corporate presence, the town itself is an atmosphere of a grittier sort, reflecting the labour-intensive industries that made the continued existence of Edmonton possible.

What works for some players will not work for others, but I Think we can all agree that money talks. As long as Klowe and the EIG are willing to provide competitive contract offers, there is no reason for us as a fan base or community to believe that the city CAN'T attract the higher-profile talent.

CanadianCommie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 07:47 PM
  #47
The Last Dynasty
Big #1 C
 
The Last Dynasty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: St. OILbert
Country: Canada
Posts: 12,613
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrolean View Post
Negatives:
Off the mainstream of entertainment tours and world focus.
really? let's see...Christina Aguilera, Gwen Stefani, The Police in the summer, the Rolling Stones, Snoop Dogg, Justin Timberlake rumoured to be coming here

we get pretty much all the big acts here

The Last Dynasty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 07:48 PM
  #48
OYLer
Registered User
 
OYLer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Win Desperate & Mad!
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,703
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Iconoclast View Post
Interesting numbers. Can't say I agree with them in any shape or form, having witnessed several funding drives first hand. I'd like to know what they classified as "cultural" spending. Let's just say that you tend to raise more money, and see more support, from places like Scottsdale rather than Avondale. I always equate it to trick or treating as kid. Do you go to the neighbourhoods where everyone drives Mercedes, or do you go to the neighbourhoods where everyone drives Kias?
I guess it has more to do with how much wealth you have personally, when you live in the USA. These two websites point to Canada's vs the US's relative standard of living:

http://www.mapsofworld.com/world-top...-life-map.html


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UN_Human_Development_Index

OYLer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-08-2007, 07:49 PM
  #49
CanadianCommie
Cold North Comrade
 
CanadianCommie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Sherwood Park, AB
Country: Canada
Posts: 10,566
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by e-townchamps View Post
really? let's see...Christina Aguilera, Gwen Stefani, The Police in the summer, the Rolling Stones, Snoop Dogg, Justin Timberlake rumoured to be coming here

we get pretty much all the big acts here
Don't forget Edmonton is on the first leg of the new Black Sabbath/Megadeth tour. A lot of big acts come here and play here. We have the venues to support a lot of musical acts and the sheer number of bands passing through has grown substantially since I started my post-secondary studies. Just on observation alone, the number of posters with recognizable bands or acts has increased dramatically.

CanadianCommie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
03-09-2007, 12:21 AM
  #50
WheatiesHockey
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 579
vCash: 500
Both Edmonton and Calgary do really have very vibrant artistic and cultural communities,probably moreso than some of the cultural waste lands where the NHL needed franchises.
Edmonton is definitely a fish bowl for an professional athlete and the community demands excellence from its most priveledged citizens.The Edmonton Eskimos missed the playoffs for the first time in 35 years and the city went through almost extreme anguish.This year the Oilers are dead in the water and the city is totally unhappy. Last May it was Oilers flags hanging from Saskatoon to Edmonton hanging from every beater truck to Cadillac Escalade.
Edmonton is a totally sports crazed city much like Detroit, but on a much smaller scale.
A player going to Edmonton pretty well has to understand that he is going there to do his job and will be scrutinsed every shift and every practise. Pretty intense.Play in some sunny hockey outpost like Florida, who knows and who cares.Go to the beach in California or Florida and no one recognises and NHL All Star.A fourth line player like Georges Laraque was immensely popular with fans in Edmonton, much loved and respected for what he did for the Oilers team.
Edmonton is a wonderful place to play hockey if a player can cope with the atmosphere.

WheatiesHockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:29 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.