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Some inline hockey Q's

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Old
07-21-2007, 10:56 AM
  #1
Brandinho
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Some inline hockey Q's

FYI, I'm talking about indoor inline hockey, not street hockey or roller hockey on asphalt or anything like that.

My school has a team and I'm interested in trying out for it in the fall so I'm hoping some experienced inline players can help me out with some questions.

1) I've heard various people say it's a much different sport from ice hockey but I've never really received much of an explanation why. Is it and how so?

2) How prevalent is skating backwards? It seems to me that skating backwards would be de-emphasized to a bit juts based on the mental picture I have of how the game would flow. Is this true? Also, would the technique for skating backwards be the same as on ice skates or would it be altered?

3) I'm not loaded but I would like to get nice gear. Does anyone have suggestions as to a good pair of inline skates that won't break my bank? Obviously, I'm not expecting them to be under $100 or anything but if there are good skates in the $100- $200 (at most) range, I'd appreciate suggestions. Ditto on sticks, what would be a good, durable stick that is fairly inexpensive? I don't need anything fancy, really.

4) Is there anything else that I should be aware of? Keep in mind, my background is in ice hockey. The only time I've played organized inline hockey is in a roller hockey league when I was a little kid and it was all ice after that.

I greatly appreciate all replies/advice/suggestions. Thanks.

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07-21-2007, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fyug View Post
FYI, I'm talking about indoor inline hockey, not street hockey or roller hockey on asphalt or anything like that.

My school has a team and I'm interested in trying out for it in the fall so I'm hoping some experienced inline players can help me out with some questions.

1) I've heard various people say it's a much different sport from ice hockey but I've never really received much of an explanation why. Is it and how so?

2) How prevalent is skating backwards? It seems to me that skating backwards would be de-emphasized to a bit juts based on the mental picture I have of how the game would flow. Is this true? Also, would the technique for skating backwards be the same as on ice skates or would it be altered?

3) I'm not loaded but I would like to get nice gear. Does anyone have suggestions as to a good pair of inline skates that won't break my bank? Obviously, I'm not expecting them to be under $100 or anything but if there are good skates in the $100- $200 (at most) range, I'd appreciate suggestions. Ditto on sticks, what would be a good, durable stick that is fairly inexpensive? I don't need anything fancy, really.

4) Is there anything else that I should be aware of? Keep in mind, my background is in ice hockey. The only time I've played organized inline hockey is in a roller hockey league when I was a little kid and it was all ice after that.

I greatly appreciate all replies/advice/suggestions. Thanks.
1) It is so much different because the turning on inline skates and being able to stop is way way different and you have to adapt to it. The puck you use in inline is also way lighter and for better stickhandlers its easier to stcikhandle and for people not good stickhandling and actual hockey puck it will be even harder. There also on 4 players on the ice at all times instead of 5, and there is no icing, no offsides, no 2 line passes. And the equipment you wear.. you only have to wear a gurtle in inline which is a very small very light type of pants, and you dont have to wear shoulder pads.

2) Skating backwards is also a nessescity in inline but I find skating backwards on inline skates and one ice skates are pretty much the same movements. But it depends how you skates backwards? I do back and forth crossovers to gain more and more speed and that seems like the better way, but if you skate backwards by just pushing you 2 feet back and forth it will be alot different.

3) Usually most of the people I play with or against use mission inline skates because they are a very popular brand that makes inline skates. Nike Bauer is starting to make them but the might be expensive. Good missions only would cost me between 150 and 250 canadian so you could get them alot cheaper in the states. Alot of people in inline tend to use cheap woodie sticks because there is really no reason for these $300 Vapor 30 sticks.

4)Nothing else really that i havent explained that I can think of at the moment

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07-21-2007, 12:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fyug View Post
FYI, I'm talking about indoor inline hockey, not street hockey or roller hockey on asphalt or anything like that.

My school has a team and I'm interested in trying out for it in the fall so I'm hoping some experienced inline players can help me out with some questions.

1) I've heard various people say it's a much different sport from ice hockey but I've never really received much of an explanation why. Is it and how so?

2) How prevalent is skating backwards? It seems to me that skating backwards would be de-emphasized to a bit juts based on the mental picture I have of how the game would flow. Is this true? Also, would the technique for skating backwards be the same as on ice skates or would it be altered?

3) I'm not loaded but I would like to get nice gear. Does anyone have suggestions as to a good pair of inline skates that won't break my bank? Obviously, I'm not expecting them to be under $100 or anything but if there are good skates in the $100- $200 (at most) range, I'd appreciate suggestions. Ditto on sticks, what would be a good, durable stick that is fairly inexpensive? I don't need anything fancy, really.

4) Is there anything else that I should be aware of? Keep in mind, my background is in ice hockey. The only time I've played organized inline hockey is in a roller hockey league when I was a little kid and it was all ice after that.

I greatly appreciate all replies/advice/suggestions. Thanks.
Just get used to the skates and if your a halfway decent ice hockey player you'll be a lot better than most roller hockey players based on game iq alone.

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07-21-2007, 12:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fyug View Post
FYI, I'm talking about indoor inline hockey, not street hockey or roller hockey on asphalt or anything like that.

My school has a team and I'm interested in trying out for it in the fall so I'm hoping some experienced inline players can help me out with some questions.

1) I've heard various people say it's a much different sport from ice hockey but I've never really received much of an explanation why. Is it and how so?

2) How prevalent is skating backwards? It seems to me that skating backwards would be de-emphasized to a bit juts based on the mental picture I have of how the game would flow. Is this true? Also, would the technique for skating backwards be the same as on ice skates or would it be altered?

3) I'm not loaded but I would like to get nice gear. Does anyone have suggestions as to a good pair of inline skates that won't break my bank? Obviously, I'm not expecting them to be under $100 or anything but if there are good skates in the $100- $200 (at most) range, I'd appreciate suggestions. Ditto on sticks, what would be a good, durable stick that is fairly inexpensive? I don't need anything fancy, really.

4) Is there anything else that I should be aware of? Keep in mind, my background is in ice hockey. The only time I've played organized inline hockey is in a roller hockey league when I was a little kid and it was all ice after that.

I greatly appreciate all replies/advice/suggestions. Thanks.
1) The previous posters already outlined how the lack of offsides and open space make it different.

2) You'll find you can't "cut" as deeply as on ice.

3) Here's a good selection of skates here: http://www.inlinewarehouse.com/HocSkateMens.html
You can use that as a reference, but I strongly suggest you go to a store to try different skates on to find the best fit. Each brand will fit different feet. Alternatively, you could also covert a pair of your ice boots to inline. This way, you know those boots fit you already and you can just mount a roller frame on them like http://www.sprung-inline.com/

In terms of sticks, you could stick with woodies. I've preferred going with shaft-blade combos. The flex on wood sticks goes haywire on me after a few games. But of course, this is true for ice as well. If you'll be playing on a surface like ice court or sport court, you could use one-piece sticks as there's negligible wear playing on that.

4) Have fun learning to stop on wheels

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07-22-2007, 02:46 PM
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As far as the skates are concerned. I would suggest a site like greatskate.com hockeygiant.com or hockeymonkey.com. Look for previous years models that are on sale. You can get some $600 skates on closeout for about $200-$250.
I perfer older models in that range as opposed to new models at the same sticker. You get a better quality in the discounted skate

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07-22-2007, 04:18 PM
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im an ice hockey to inline hockey guy, and it seems that ice hockey players almost always have better skating fundamentals (yes, even on wheels) then inline players. Ice players have much more powerful strides and are harder to knock over, usually built more as well, where inline players are generally skinny guys that can stop and do a few nice moves, but are easy to knock off the puck.

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07-22-2007, 04:48 PM
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You seem to make a distinction between roller hockey and inline hockey? What's the difference in your opinion? I use those terms interchangeably...

Yes you should learn to skate backwards as you will not be able to play defense effectively through the neutral and defensive zone... Learning to skate backwards is essential if you plan to be competitive...

If I was on your budget, I would probably order these skates:

http://www.inlinewarehouse.com/descpage.html?pcode=RH5K

Also, check out this replacement blade:

http://www.inlinewarehouse.com/descp...?pcode=K2100SB

Very inexpensive, durable, and reliable... I been using them for 10+ years....

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07-22-2007, 05:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turd Ferguson View Post
ce players have much more powerful strides and are harder to knock over, usually built more as well, where inline players are generally skinny guys that can stop and do a few nice moves, but are easy to knock off the puck.
I would disagree there.

I don't deny that most ice hockey players are naturally thicker and more powerful skaters. But a good inline player probably has better one-on-one moves to even avoid a hit (being use to more open surface, less players, etc) so I'm not sure if the generality you point out is that much of an advantage in roller hockey.

But, of course, take the roller hockey player to ice and then it's a whole 'nother story.

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07-22-2007, 05:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fyug View Post
FYI, I'm talking about indoor inline hockey, not street hockey or roller hockey on asphalt or anything like that.

My school has a team and I'm interested in trying out for it in the fall so I'm hoping some experienced inline players can help me out with some questions.

1) I've heard various people say it's a much different sport from ice hockey but I've never really received much of an explanation why. Is it and how so?

2) How prevalent is skating backwards? It seems to me that skating backwards would be de-emphasized to a bit juts based on the mental picture I have of how the game would flow. Is this true? Also, would the technique for skating backwards be the same as on ice skates or would it be altered?

3) I'm not loaded but I would like to get nice gear. Does anyone have suggestions as to a good pair of inline skates that won't break my bank? Obviously, I'm not expecting them to be under $100 or anything but if there are good skates in the $100- $200 (at most) range, I'd appreciate suggestions. Ditto on sticks, what would be a good, durable stick that is fairly inexpensive? I don't need anything fancy, really.

4) Is there anything else that I should be aware of? Keep in mind, my background is in ice hockey. The only time I've played organized inline hockey is in a roller hockey league when I was a little kid and it was all ice after that.

I greatly appreciate all replies/advice/suggestions. Thanks.
The skating is similar, but stopping takes alot of practice because there is nothing to dig into.

I suggest getting a pair of wheels made for indoor hockey, or you will be slipping all over the place. I have used Mr. Sticky for about 10 years and never found a better wheel for indoor roller hockey. Not sure if you can get them where you live?

As for skates, you can customize a pair of your ice skates. Get a pair of your ice skates and get roller hockey frames put on them.

All of the off shelf roller blades are garbage. Alot of ppl. will try to tell you otherwise, but believe me, they are ass.

Also, get a pair of frames that can be rockered. Rockered skates feel much more like skating on ice... trying to skate on 4 wheels is clumsy and the turning and cutting is alot different than on ice skates. But if they are rockered, you are only skating on 2 wheels and it gives you the contoured feeling of your ice skate blade... it makes a dramatic difference.

- Get the right wheels
- Customize your skates
- Rocker your skates

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07-22-2007, 05:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfgaze View Post
You seem to make a distinction between roller hockey and inline hockey? What's the difference in your opinion? I use those terms interchangeably...

Yes you should learn to skate backwards as you will not be able to play defense effectively through the neutral and defensive zone... Learning to skate backwards is essential if you plan to be competitive...

If I was on your budget, I would probably order these skates:

http://www.inlinewarehouse.com/descpage.html?pcode=RH5K

Also, check out this replacement blade:

http://www.inlinewarehouse.com/descp...?pcode=K2100SB

Very inexpensive, durable, and reliable... I been using them for 10+ years....
Ive seen many people play with the KOHO 2100 blade. To be honest with you, I need a more durable blade. I am currently using an 1150 Axion Crosby blade, and its starting to wear down. I am highly thinking of switching to the KOHO blade. I found a better steal though. Try http://www.cyclonetaylor.com/players...ate2100sr.html

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Old
07-22-2007, 05:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brunomics View Post
Just get used to the skates and if your a halfway decent ice hockey player you'll be a lot better than most roller hockey players based on game iq alone.
How do you come up with that brilliant deduction?? Knowing how to play ice doesn't mean anything when it comes to playing roller. The whole game is different, it's not just the skating. How can someone going from ice to roller know how to play roller hockey better than guys who are already playing? That's like saying a halfway decent batter in baseball will know how to play cricket better than guys who actually play cricket. I've seen ice players try to play roller and many times they are clueless out there. They may have the same skills as they had in ice, but their knowledge of how to play the game is terrible.

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07-22-2007, 07:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fyug View Post
My school has a team and I'm interested in trying out for it in the fall so I'm hoping some experienced inline players can help me out with some questions.
I see in your info that you're located in Miami...Do you got to 'The U'? They have a pretty competitive team in the NCRHA, D-2. I'm not sure someone with no roller experience could breeze in and earn a spot on the roster, but I definitely still encourage you to try.

Quote:
1) I've heard various people say it's a much different sport from ice hockey but I've never really received much of an explanation why. Is it and how so?
I haven't seen this answered the way I thought, so here are a few differences:

--The pace of the game is different. In roller hockey, it's more controlled and more delibarate than ice. Since there's only 8 skaters on the floor, there's a lot more open room. Also, with no offsides and 2 line passes the entire surface is opened up. I'm not talking about cherry picking (although that might happen from some hacks) I'm talking about forwards stretching the floor vertically.

--95% of the best inline players play defense. They're the ones leading the rush (as forwards stretch the floor to open up more room) and they're the best skaters, so even if there is a turnover chances are they get on their horse and get back on D.

--Goalies are pretty much toast. It's almost like lacrosse in that even the best goalies don't really have a chance. 6, 7, 8 goals for one team is not uncommon. Puck possesion is so key, so crucial, many teams the more skilled team will just pick apart the opposition and deke the helpless goalie.

--A powerplay is really like a lay-up. Again, this goes back to the concept of puck possesion being important. Plus a regular roller hockey powerplay is 4 on 3, opening up even more of the surface than you might realize on first thought.

--In roller, you might have a 3, 4 minute shift. And there's usually only about 8 skaters a side, so it's pretty much just two lines. That's about unthinkable in the frantic pace of icehockey.

--Ice hockey is a lot more physical. Usually hitting is frowned upon in roller hockey (though a large part depends on the league) but things can get chippy. As mentioned, players only wear shin pads, a cup, elbow pads and gloves as padding.

All in all, as you could see I emphasized individual skill, puck possesion, controlled technique and a lot more open room to demonstrate all of that. I think that's the main differences.

Quote:
2) How prevalent is skating backwards? It seems to me that skating backwards would be de-emphasized to a bit juts based on the mental picture I have of how the game would flow. Is this true? Also, would the technique for skating backwards be the same as on ice skates or would it be altered?
There's a lot of backwards skating, when the other team has the puck, forwards will generally fall back to a certain point, and I'd bet roller hockey defensemen probably skate backwards about as much as their ice hockey brethren.

Quote:
3) I'm not loaded but I would like to get nice gear. Does anyone have suggestions as to a good pair of inline skates that won't break my bank? Obviously, I'm not expecting them to be under $100 or anything but if there are good skates in the $100- $200 (at most) range, I'd appreciate suggestions. Ditto on sticks, what would be a good, durable stick that is fairly inexpensive? I don't need anything fancy, really.
Previous posts were helpful, so let me just add/stress:

All inline floors are not created equal and you'll want to make sure you've got the right wheels for your floor. Icecourts grip different than sportcourts. Any roller player will tell you, gripping the floor is probably the biggest difference and challenge you'll face switching from ice. If you don't even have the right wheels for your specific court you're practically dead in the water from the very beginning.

So I'd probably ask someone in a local proshop about floor conditions and get their recommendations on the best wheel to get you maximum grip.

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07-23-2007, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Johnny Drama View Post
I see in your info that you're located in Miami...Do you got to 'The U'? They have a pretty competitive team in the NCRHA, D-2. I'm not sure someone with no roller experience could breeze in and earn a spot on the roster, but I definitely still encourage you to try.



I haven't seen this answered the way I thought, so here are a few differences:

--The pace of the game is different. In roller hockey, it's more controlled and more delibarate than ice. Since there's only 8 skaters on the floor, there's a lot more open room. Also, with no offsides and 2 line passes the entire surface is opened up. I'm not talking about cherry picking (although that might happen from some hacks) I'm talking about forwards stretching the floor vertically.

--95% of the best inline players play defense. They're the ones leading the rush (as forwards stretch the floor to open up more room) and they're the best skaters, so even if there is a turnover chances are they get on their horse and get back on D.

--Goalies are pretty much toast. It's almost like lacrosse in that even the best goalies don't really have a chance. 6, 7, 8 goals for one team is not uncommon. Puck possesion is so key, so crucial, many teams the more skilled team will just pick apart the opposition and deke the helpless goalie.

--A powerplay is really like a lay-up. Again, this goes back to the concept of puck possesion being important. Plus a regular roller hockey powerplay is 4 on 3, opening up even more of the surface than you might realize on first thought.

--In roller, you might have a 3, 4 minute shift. And there's usually only about 8 skaters a side, so it's pretty much just two lines. That's about unthinkable in the frantic pace of icehockey.

--Ice hockey is a lot more physical. Usually hitting is frowned upon in roller hockey (though a large part depends on the league) but things can get chippy. As mentioned, players only wear shin pads, a cup, elbow pads and gloves as padding.

All in all, as you could see I emphasized individual skill, puck possesion, controlled technique and a lot more open room to demonstrate all of that. I think that's the main differences.



There's a lot of backwards skating, when the other team has the puck, forwards will generally fall back to a certain point, and I'd bet roller hockey defensemen probably skate backwards about as much as their ice hockey brethren.



Previous posts were helpful, so let me just add/stress:

All inline floors are not created equal and you'll want to make sure you've got the right wheels for your floor. Icecourts grip different than sportcourts. Any roller player will tell you, gripping the floor is probably the biggest difference and challenge you'll face switching from ice. If you don't even have the right wheels for your specific court you're practically dead in the water from the very beginning.

So I'd probably ask someone in a local proshop about floor conditions and get their recommendations on the best wheel to get you maximum grip.
That's a solid summary.

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07-23-2007, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnTavares09 View Post
Ive seen many people play with the KOHO 2100 blade. To be honest with you, I need a more durable blade. I am currently using an 1150 Axion Crosby blade, and its starting to wear down. I am highly thinking of switching to the KOHO blade. I found a better steal though. Try http://www.cyclonetaylor.com/players...ate2100sr.html
Yeah, but that's an ABS blade. That might be a damn good ABS blade, but it's still only good for playing with a ball on the street or on a tennis court (or a ball hockey league). An ABS blade is useless for shooting roller pucks, too much give.

For league roller hockey play on sport court, any ice hockey stick will do. Use the same one that you use for ice.

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07-23-2007, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by WVpens View Post
Yeah, but that's an ABS blade. That might be a damn good ABS blade, but it's still only good for playing with a ball on the street or on a tennis court (or a ball hockey league). An ABS blade is useless for shooting roller pucks, too much give.

For league roller hockey play on sport court, any ice hockey stick will do. Use the same one that you use for ice.
Well I play with the ball, so it does benefit me a lot. Just went to my local hockey store and bought one for 17 bucks. I didnt realize they had so many of that blade. Its basically an entire shelf full. I havent really tried using a puck yet so I presume you are right in saying that it does have too much give, but its perfect for a hockey ball if thats what you are using. I find it a better fit for me because its easier to control the ball and hit it out of the air for deflections. Nice curve too. Its not closed all the way which is good for shooting high and saucer passes. Thats just my take.

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07-23-2007, 04:49 PM
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in my experience- the best roller hockey players ive played with are ice hockey players.


i went from roller to ice and found the transition very easy- and the ice skating has helped my inline skating threefold.


ps- generally, good inline players are usually very strong in one on one situations. ice players are more team oriented.

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07-23-2007, 05:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WVpens View Post
Yeah, but that's an ABS blade. That might be a damn good ABS blade, but it's still only good for playing with a ball on the street or on a tennis court (or a ball hockey league). An ABS blade is useless for shooting roller pucks, too much give.

For league roller hockey play on sport court, any ice hockey stick will do. Use the same one that you use for ice.
Can you expound on that?

See I've been playing outdoor inline hockey for nearly 15 years now and I've only played indoor inline hockey for 2 sessions now... Once 5 years ago and now I'm currently playing in a league... I use that KOHO Ultimate 2100 ABS blade...

What I'm having problems with is my slapshot with the puck... I can't get it more then a foot off the ground... My mechanics are perfect (I have a very strong/accurate slap shot)... I've tried adjusting my grip on my lower hand, no luck... I can't figure it out except to blame the blade...

What's weird is that if I take an inline puck and throw it on an outdoor surface, I can get the puck up to about crossbar height no problem... I'm thinking there's more friction between the blade and the outdoor surface outdoors then there is between the blade and the indoor sportcourt indoors? That's the only conclusion I can come up with...

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07-25-2007, 12:21 PM
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Well, ABS blades have that plastic running through the blade. It's a great for playing on rough surfaces because the plastic keeps the blade from splintering, but it's not rigid enough for slapshots with any form of a puck.

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07-25-2007, 01:25 PM
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Originally Posted by WVpens View Post
Well, ABS blades have that plastic running through the blade. It's a great for playing on rough surfaces because the plastic keeps the blade from splintering, but it's not rigid enough for slapshots with any form of a puck.
I definitely understand now. I played with a puck yesterday. I am horrible when using a puck to begin with. I tried a couple slap shots and got it barely off teh ground. Wristers work pretty nice though. Got em top shelf a few times. But I still work better with a hockey ball than a puck. Just my personal taste.

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07-25-2007, 06:57 PM
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As far as ABS blades go, buy Montreal wood blades. They're the best and its not even up for debate. If anyone wants to debate me on this point, feel free. But just realize that I play on this rink on a daily basis.





*Not me in the photos. Non-game pics.

It helps when its two minutes away from your house and theres not an indoor rink for 100 miles. Thats polished concrete, after almost a decade of playing on that rink ive got a pretty good idea of what works and what doesn't.

Montreal wood blades are the best and id imagine they could probably last months on a tile/sportcourt surface. Ive tried Easton, Koho, RBK and CCM wood blades and they all melt within a couple days. I can usually get two-three weeks out of a montreal M95.

A full set of Rink Rat World Cups usually last a month and a half if not longer if properly rotated.

EDIT: Skates:


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07-26-2007, 04:59 PM
  #21
wolfgaze
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That rink is AWESOME... *drools*

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07-26-2007, 08:43 PM
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MikeD
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Nice rink. It looks much like the outdoor "Twin" rink facilities found all over the Miami-Dade area. A lot of great players in the M-D extreme outdoor RHL. Check around for your local rink. Most guys show up around the 7-8 Pm hour for pick-up practices and Games. I played at the location near Sunset and Osceola (hollywood) (Joe Dimagio Hospital is down the street) The guys are friendly and will give you a ton of advice on gear.

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07-26-2007, 10:28 PM
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triggrman
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That rink is awesome? Really?

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07-26-2007, 10:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by triggrman View Post
That rink is awesome? Really?
Worthless dig, thats ok though. I know its not an indoor rink but its free and its like having a $300,000 rink in my backyard.

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07-26-2007, 10:50 PM
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Granlund2Pulkkinen*
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Take it from me... I've been playing Ice-Hockey since I was 3 (17 years) and I've been playing roller for 8 years


1) It is different because there are minimal to no penalties and there's a greater emphasis on puckhandling, speed and dangling, while in ice it depends alot on passing and sniping... So if you're a good skater and a decent puck handler you should be lighting it up.

2) It is used alot if you play D. Just be sure to keep that butt down.

3) Skates= http://rollerhockeymonkey.com/nike-rsflexlite6jr.html (these are good, trust me)
Stick= http://rollerhockeymonkey.com/eastonstealthsr.html
--~~ORDER FROM THERE~~--

4) Be sure to keep skating and make contact when you're challenging for the puck.. Don't stop skating ever. Be sure your roller hockey pants aren't baggy in the crotch or it may be harder to power skate... Cups may be a bit harder to wear so if you're comfortable not wearing one (which I HIGHLY recomend you wear one) just don't block shots and you should be fine (disclaimer: I am not responsable for loss of manhood)


I like you fyug... even if we have tussled... This is what you should know and if you want to know anything else just PM me.


Last edited by Granlund2Pulkkinen*: 07-26-2007 at 11:13 PM.
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