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Old
11-05-2007, 11:31 PM
  #51
God Bless Canada
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Just so you guys know, I'll be focusing on the rookie GMs for my evaluations. At the end of the day, they're the ones who probably need it the most, and I'm going to start with my esteemed division rivals in Seattle. I'll get to the others as the week rolls along.

Start with coaching. Adams is a solid coach, but he's tough and demanding. He's the type of coach who, like Punch Imlach, needs a hard-working team high in character. The ideal assistant coach would be a peacekeeper/peacemaker type, a player's coach like a Pat Quinn. I don't know if Hitchcock is tailor-made for that role, although Hitchcock should give you strong strategy.

Dryden's a rock in net. His peak is as good as any goalie who ever played. All-star team selections, Stanley Cups, a Conn Smythe, he did it all. Well, except for give entertaining interviews. Great writer, but boring quote. Kiprusoff's established himself as a credible back-up.

I think your team should be okay with moving the puck. Blake's a good puck-mover. Inconsistent at times, but he makes a strong first pass. Hod Stuart's a star. He might actually be your No. 1. And Bill White is very underrated, a solid No. 3 who can move the puck and take care of his own zone. I think White and Blake might be a pretty good pairing. Babe Siebert is a very good puckmover, too.

Schoenfeld's a rock-solid third pairing guy, a defensive stalward and an expert shot-blocker. Neilson was a good physical defenceman, and he actually was a good puck-mover who had some productive seasons. I really like Engblom as a No. 8.

One thing I must say about your team is that it's nice to see someone give Ullman and Barry they deserve. Ullman's one of the top 100 players ever for my money. Barry's in the middle of the pack for second line centres, but it's nice to see him picked ahead of Joe Thornton.

The first two lines should be productive. Obviously you got the luck of the draw with Howe. I actually like the Conacher-Ullman-Howe line. Conacher's skill (he had a point-per-game in 1949), Ullman's two-way game and Howe's toughness should be a good combo. Northcott and Foytson are probably in the bottom tier for second line wingers, but they aren't a stretch for the second line, either. My only concern is whether they're going to have the toughness to handle teams in their division like Portage and New York Raiders.

I really like the third line. Kasper and Westfall are very smart and excellent defensively (just don't let Kasper have a say in coaching decisions), and McPhee is a big grinder for the corners. I'm not worried about Sutter, he was one of the top three defensive centres from the last minor league draft. I think Flatley might be a bit of a stretch, but he's not a liability.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Agent Dale Cooper View Post
How about the T-Birds
General Managers: nik jr. and Agent Dale Cooper
Head Coach: Jack Adams
Assistant Coach: Ken "Captain Kangaroo" Hitchcock
#8 Roy Conacher-#16 Norm "Noisy" Ullman-#9 Gordie "Mr. Hockey" Howe (C)
#14 Lawrence "Baldy" Northcott-#7 Marty "Goal-A-Game" Barry-#5 Frank "Flash" Foyston
#35 Mike Mcphee-#11 Steve Kasper-#18 Ed "Shadow" Westfall (A)
#17 Tony "Mighty Mouse" Leswick-#12 Ron Sutter-#26 Patrick "Flats" Flatley
#1 Albert "Babe" Siebert (A)-#4 Rob "Buzzard" Blake
#3 William "Hod" Stuart (A)-#2 Bill White
#6 Jim Schoenfeld-#15 Jim "Chief" Nielson
X-#27 Mike Murphy, #13 Brian Engblom

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11-05-2007, 11:36 PM
  #52
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Head Coach - Dr. Jan Starsi
Captain - Steve Yzerman
Alternates - Brian Sutter, Rod Langway

#91 Markus Naslund - #19 Steve Yzerman (C) - #9 Lanny McDonald
#11 Brian Sutter (A) - #26 Peter Stastny - #22 Mike Gartner
#18 Ross Lonsberry - #27 Jeremy Roenick - #10 Owen Nolan
#8 Curt Fraser - #12 Brent Sutter - #20 Cliff Koroll
#21 Ray Ferraro

#5 Rod Langway (A) - Lennart Svedberg
#7 Frantisek Pospisil - #29 Jiri Bubla
#6 Calle Johansson- #44 Dave Babych
#92 Kenny Jonsson

#1 Glenn Hall
#31 Mike Liut
#37 Olaf Kolzig

Powerplay
1st Unit - Naslund - Yzerman - Nolan - Babych - Svedberg
2nd Unit - Brian Sutter - Stastny - Gartner - Pospisil - Bubla

PK
1st Unit - Yzerman - Lonsberry - Langway - Johansson
2nd Unit - Brent Sutter - Koroll - Pospisil - Bubla




Self Evaluation.

Strengths -
Balanced offense, all of my lines can score.
Leadership, a ton of former captains.
Strong transition game, my defense while not the most mobile will be able to move the puck.
Grit, lots of gritty wingers willing to pay the price to win.
Great goaltending, Hall is one of the best ever.

Weakness -
Lack of a true shutdown line, will have to rely on the entire team to play defense.
Weak top 2 defense pairing.



Fire away.


Last edited by BlueBleeder: 11-06-2007 at 11:12 AM.
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Old
11-05-2007, 11:37 PM
  #53
ck26
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DALLAS BLACKHAWKS
Busher Jackson - Bryan Trottier (A) - Bryan Hextall
Dany Heatley - Mike Modano - Jari Kurri
John MacLean - Guy Carbonneau (C) - Jean Pronovost
Red Berenson - Garry Unger - Marian Hossa

Larry Murphy (A) - Larry Robinson (A)
Dickie Boon - Steve Duchesne
Ron Greschner - Ed Jovanovski

Tony Esposito
Chris Osgood

Healthy scratches: Billy Gilmour, Dave Schultz, Sandis Ozolinsh

Powerplay:
Jackson - Trottier - Hextall
Murphy - Robinson
Heatley - Modano - Kurri
Duchesne - Greschner

Penalty kill:
Carbonneau - MacLean - Robinson - Boon
Modano - Kurri - Jovanovski - Murphy

Last minute trailing:
Jackson - Trottier - Hextall
Kurri
Robinson - Duchesne

Last minute leading:
Modano - Carbonneau - Kurri
Robinson - Boon

Coach Herb Brooks’s MO is working within the system. He preaches teamwork, he’s a good motivator and he can reel in a talented-if-erratic players. His style will grate on players and he probably won’t have a long career in Dallas, but there have been few better when it comes to helping develop young players (we have plenty) and getting a team to play above their collective heads. He’s never won seriously at the NHL level, but he has Olympic gold (with kids), Olympic silver (with NHL'ers) and 3 NCAA titles.

Our team captains are Guy Carbonneau, Bryan Trottier, Larry Murphy and Larry Robinson. Carbonneau, Trottier and Murphy won a combined 13 Stanley Cups for 6 different teams, and all were brought into their 2nd team specifically for their leadership and experience. Robinson only won Cups with 1 team, but he did win 6, so all is forgiven. In retirement, Carbonneau, Robinson and Trottier have all taken up NHL coaching. Robinson and Trottier have each won a Cup behind the bench as well. All but a couple of our forwards are great fits for the coach and the system. Trottier, Modano, Kurri, MacLean, Unger, Carbonneau, Berenson and Hossa are all strong skaters and are two-way guys and great cogs in our machine.

1st line
Busher Jackson and Bryan Hextall have already been praised is some of the steals of the draft, so if you don’t know about these guys, listen to your colleagues and vote high!!! Trottier is the worker and while he’s not Beliveau, he is one of the better two-way centers in NHL history. As already mentioned, he has 6 Cup wins and knows a thing or two about feeding talented teammates – you don’t think Mike Bossy was passing to himself, do you?

2nd line
We like Modano-Kurri to be productive offensively as well as to skate with / shut down most #1 lines. Heatley has been an allstar on both right and left wing, so we’ll flip-flop the wingers in order to use Kurri as a shadow against the opposition's best forward. Against the Golden Jet, Kurri plays right. Against the Rocket, Kurri plays left. Heater can do the business offensively from either side. Heatley's service probably won't be Spezza-good, but nobody's ever complained about having to play with Modano. Ever.

3rd line
Jean Pronovost and John MacLean is probably the only 90-goal 3rd line tandem in ATD history, but there are no defensive slouches on that line. There was a debate earlier about which version of a two-phased player you're getting -- if that's still an issue, I want the 2nd-half, grumpy old man version of MacLean. Carbonneau’s draft position is overrated by some (ie: me), but he’s still among the -- if not the -- best defensive centers of all time.

4th line
Garry Unger and Red Berenson both starred out west during the 1970’s and should mesh well. Unger is a gamer who held the ironman record and is a quintessential 4th liner. Berenson and Marian Hossa both play extremely well-rounded games and can do a bit of everything on the ice.

Scratches
Billy Gilmour is an offensive sub who will take over for Berenson or Unger if the team goes cold. Obviously LW Dave Schultz is around to be the pugilist. 2nd line LW Dany Heatley and 3rd line LW John MacLean can both play equally well on the right side, which should give us some flexibility on how and where to employ Schultzie.

Defense
Our defense is probably the most talented 7-some in the league, but it’s already caught some flak. First things first. Larry Robinson is the playmaker and the heart and soul. He’s big and mean and clean and responsible, and he’ll be expected to log 25+ minutes a night against all the best lines in the league. Murphy is heady, quiet and consistent. He’s had 3 partners win Norris and this year could be #4. Both are confident and skilled on the puck, making breakout passes and supporting the offense equally well. Dickie Boon is a speed-skating champ and solid defensive defenseman who will pair nicely with the boringly consistent Steve Duchesne. Greschner is a poor man’s Brian Leetch – a Ranger who is great offensively and mostly reliable defensively. The Jovo-cop is going to need the coach’s help to motivate him and remove some mistakes from his game, but when he's on his game, there are few better. Healthy scratch is the talented-if-troubled Sandis Ozolinsh.

Goalers
In goal, Tony Esposito will do the heavy lifting. Every year Tony Esposito played for a team called "The Blackhawks" they made the playoffs (hint, hint). He never won the Cup, but his Vezinas + Canada Cup success give us all the evidence we need. Chris Osgood won a Cup himself and sat on the bench for another. He's displayed loyalty and patience and will be a great backup.

Team strengths
1) Versatility. Our forwards back-check and our defensemen can join the rush. All five players will be productive over the entire ice.
2) Top-6 forwards. I think I have the best 1-2 lines in the league.

Team weaknesses
1) Size. We don't have any. Even when we use that wacky "adjusted size" stat ... wow. Especially on defense. The non-Robinson size we do have (Ozolinsh, Jovanovski, Greschner) isn't very physical.
2) Stay-at-home defensemen. We don't have any of those either. Speed and decisiveness on the puck can compensate, especially with our coach's system. As long as we stay out of penalty trouble we should be OK.


Last edited by ck26: 11-06-2007 at 10:17 PM.
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Old
11-05-2007, 11:37 PM
  #54
God Bless Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pitseleh View Post
Clippers Self-Evaluation

Coach: Hap Day
Captain: Hap Day
Alternate Captains: Bobby Orr and Lionel Hitchman

Sweeney Schriner - Joe Primeau - Charlie Conacher
Kevin Stevens - Frank Nighbor - Ed Litzenberger
Dean Prentice - Cooney Weiland - Bobby Rousseau
Hec Kilrea - Glen Skov - Eric Nesterenko
Camille Henry

Bobby Orr - Brad McCrimmon
Lionel Conacher - Hap Day
Viktor Kuzkin - Lionel Hitchman
Gilles Marotte

Clint Benedict
Tom Barrasso
Viktor Konovalenko

Strengths

Synergy through the roster: I feel, like last time, that I have a team that reflects the type of team that Hap Day can build to maximize their potential.

-Playmaking , offensively creative and extremely defensively responsible top-2 centers in Primeau and Nighbor.
-Big, strong top-6 wingers - Conacher, Stevens and Litzenberger were all very big men in their day, while Schriner was of slightly above average size and was actually a part of 2 of Day’s Leafs’ Stanley Cup wins.
-A good collection of defensive two-way forwards throughout the entire bottom six.
-A strong collection of defensive defensemen - Orr, Conacher, Day, McCrimmon and Hitchman were all very good to excellent defensively.
-A very good goaltender in Benedict (personally I feel he’s in the top-10 between about 8-10, but at worst he’s in the top half of goalies), as well as depth with Barrasso and Konovalenko.

Day is one of the best defensive coaches of all-time and I feel that we’ve given him the defensively oriented personnel that he can excel with playing a defensive orientated.

Defensive Balance: Overall, I’m very happy with the defense I’ve been able to put together. Orr is the best ever, Conacher could be a #1 guy in a 28 team draft, Day and McCrimmon are good #3/4 while I feel that Hitchman could be a #4 guy. Kuzkin is an adequate #6 playing minimal minutes and acting as a PP specialist. I also feel that we've put together a good mix of offense and defense from the back end as well as a good share of physicality.

Scoring Depth: While my top-6 isn’t near the top in terms of offensive production (more on that later), we’re hoping to make that up with scoring depth from both our defense and third line. Orr gives us a game-breaker from the back end, something few teams can claim. Conacher was also very good offensively, finishing top-5 amongst defensemen on seven occasions while Day is also very underrated offensively, finishing amongst the top-5 six times. Kuzkin was a good offensive talent as well. As for the third line, Prentice, Weiland and Rousseau were all very offensively talented and were at or near the top of the league in scoring on several occasions through their careers.

Weaknesses

Top-6 Scoring: While overall I don’t feel it’s a huge deficiency, with some guys being above average at their respective positions, my top-6 isn’t one that is going to strike fear into opposing teams. Primeau is one of the weakest top line centers in the draft (though I do think that he’s better than his draft position reflects) while my second line isn’t at the same level of offensive dominance as many teams have.

Barrasso as a Backup: Barrasso’s attitude was definitely a concern for me when I selected him, but his talent relative to his draft position was undeniable. Grabbing Konovalenko hopefully mitigates the risk associated with Barrasso’s selection, since I feel that Konovalenko is a competent backup and we can send Barrasso to the pressbox/home if he starts to pull his crap when the playoffs come around.

Size on the Third Line: Like last draft, my third line is focussed on two-way ability – strong offensive creativity and defensive ability – and speed. They should be a handful for many top lines, hopefully keeping them honest. The only issue that comes up is their relative lack of size, which may become an issue if they are matching up with a bigger and stronger team. In that case, I feel comfortable enough with my fourth line in a defensive role to pick up the slack. We also have the option to move players up from the fourth line to add some size to that line.

Steals

Sweeney Schriner at 172: Schriner is an above average top line LW, and to get one at that point is very good value, IMO.

Joe Primeau at 187: I think Primeau should go closer to Ratelle and Cowley than Niewendyk and Savard personally. He led the league in assists three times, was very good defensively and didn't shy away from contact.

Lionel Hitchman at 396: I think Hitchman is a viable option for a top-4 defenseman in a 28 team draft, so to get him at that point as a #5 guy was great.

Too Early

Kevin Stevens at 225: At the time, I was very worried about adding more size and physical play in my top-6 because I was worried about Nighbor's relative lack of size. To do so, though, I gave up the opportunity to have a more offensively dynamic second line that a guy like Yakushev or Mosienko could have brought.

Cooney Weiland at 421: While I think that Weiland was a good value pick at that point, what I gave up to get him (Finnigan) wasn't worth it. I would have settled for a guy like Laprade if it meant I could have had Finnigan as well.

If anyone else wants to tackle a review, I'd appreciate it.
pit, I won't go too far into evaluating your team, I'll leave that to HO, VanI, Eagle or one of the other talkers. But I think you're being too hard on yourself with the Weiland trade. I think he's one of the biggest steals of the draft. An offensive producer who can take care of his own zone. So what if Finnigan was picked? You can't control that. And I'd take Weiland ahead of Finnigan.

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11-05-2007, 11:45 PM
  #55
pitseleh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by God Bless Canada View Post
pit, I won't go too far into evaluating your team, I'll leave that to HO, VanI, Eagle or one of the other talkers. But I think you're being too hard on yourself with the Weiland trade. I think he's one of the biggest steals of the draft. An offensive producer who can take care of his own zone. So what if Finnigan was picked? You can't control that. And I'd take Weiland ahead of Finnigan.
Yeah, I might be beating myself up too much over it. Finnigan is just a guy I've always loved and was a guy I had targeted before the draft. I think it may have been the disappointment more than anything else.

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Old
11-06-2007, 01:02 AM
  #56
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Here’s a brief (by my standards) look at my team. This is a busy week for me, but I’ll try my best to do some more reviews during the next few days.

STRENGTHS

Strong playoff performances. Quite simply, this team was designed to win the in playoffs. It starts in net with Turk Broda; he’s a good regular season goalie but his value jumps to somewhere in the 6-10 range, all-time, in the postseason. Broda was the starting goalie on five Cup-winning teams and won one retro Conn Smythe. Broda ranks 3rd in adjusted playoff wins (Pnep). His 25% drop in GAA (postseason vs regular season) is the best improvement all-time, and he also boasts the 4th largest improvement in win percentage. My two other goalies feature a Conn Smythe winner and a 3-time Cup champion (as a backup).

The blueline features Denis Potvin, captain of all four Islander championship teams, a perennial Conn Smythe contender. Marcel Pronovost was the #2 defenseman (behind Red Kelly) on five Cup-winning teams while Bill Barilko was the tough, rugged, shutdown defenseman on four Cup-winning teams. My forward ranks boast three Smythe winners (Lalonde, Cournoyer and Bonin). Jarvis, Smith and Marcotte, three key depth players, played important roles on some of the NHL’s greatest teams.

Transitional offense. The Canadiens have one of the best transitional offenses in the draft, due to excellent speed from the forwards and the presence of many mobile, playmaking defensemen. Lalonde and Cournoyer, two of the fastest players of their generation, gives the team a speedy, skilled top line with great acceleration and, more importantly, the ability to execute complex offensive plays at high speeds. Jean Ratelle was a fast, smooth-skating centre and should be able to generate some good rushes with the speedy Hooley Smith. Jarvis and Martin, though in a defensive role, were both great skaters who could contribute to the rush if necessary.

Turning to the blueline, Denis Potvin is one of the best rushing defensemen of the past fifty years. He used his great acceleration and strength to carry the puck up the ice and either pass it off to a team or finish the job himself. (He scored a career-high 101 points with all-time greats, but keep in mind that he scored 98 point playing on a de facto expansion team). Marcel Pronovost was an aggressive rusher who finished in the top five in scoring three times. Spare defenseman Lloyd Cook finished in the top ten in scoring six times in the PCHA (top ten in the entire league, not top ten among defensemen).

Tough, rugged, defensive blueline. From 1 to 7, I think I have one of the toughest and best defensive bluelines in the draft. Denis Potvin was an aggressive hitter, willing to drop the gloves with anybody. He was able to shut down opponents’ stars (look at what he did to Gretzky in the 1984 Cup finals) and play on the PK. Harry Howell was rated the best defensive player of the 1960s, and, like Bill Hajt, used clean positional play to out-think opponents and separate them from the puck without taking a penalty. Marcel Pronovost and Bill Barilko were very rough, aggressive blueliners, willing to hit anybody. They both gave their dynasties an intimidation factor in the defensive zone, and were used extensively on the PK. Rob Ramage was a big hitter and also played extensively on the PK. The one guy I’m not sure about is Lloyd Cook, though I do know he was tough enough to fight **** ****** (and broke his nose). I’m confident in playing everyone except Cook in a defensive role, and all of them except Howell and Hajt were tough hitters.

Penalty kill. Don Marcotte and Doug Jarvis were both elite defensive forwards, and were good enough to receive lots of PK ice time on two of the NHL’s greatest teams. Troy Murray won the Selke trophy and was a decent SHG threat while also receiving serious PK ice time. Jean Ratelle was a key PK for Team Canada in the 1972 Summit Series, while the versatile Hooley Smith was used by the Maroons in nearly every situation. Marcel Bonin was the defensive conscience to Beliveau and Geoffrion. See the previous point re my blueline, but, aside from Cook, all of my defensemen were regular PKers.

Coaching. Al Arbour seems to be the consensus #3 coach in NHL history. He generally favors an up-tempo team with a reasonable balance between offense and defense (which suits my team). He is also known for getting the most out of role players (there would have been no dynasty without Bourne, Goring and Morrow, among others).

WEAKNESSES

Size up front. For the third draft in a row, I see that my forwards are fairly small. Lalonde (5’ 9”, 168 lbs) and Cournoyer (5’ 7”, 178 lbs) give me two-third of a fairly small top line (though Simmer does provide some size and Lalonde was quite a tough player anyway). My second and fourth lines are fairly large/tough, but my third line (three players in the 175 lbs range) is quite small for a defensive line.

LW scoring. Though the potential is there, my LW are relatively un-productive, offensively. Charlie Simmer had an incredible two-season run (scored 112 goals and 206 pts in 129 games, 1st and 3rd in goals those years) but, due to injuries, wasn’t dominant for long enough. Vic Hadfield had one huge season but was otherwise a 60-point guy. Marcotte and Bonin peaked at 50-60 points; not bad for their era, but they obviously weren’t drafted for their offense.

Pierre Turgeon. The best offensive player available at the time (among NHL players, at least), but he doesn’t really fit in with my team’s rugged style or playoff mentality.

STEALS

- Newsy Lalonde (70). He was the best forward of his decade and proved himself to be a Hart-calibre player at the NHL level. Good skater and great toughness.

- Jean Ratelle (154). Still goes too late. Better than several centres taken before him (Modano, Sundin, probably even Sittler). Underrated defensive game.

- Don Marcotte (379). Defensive forwards of his calibre are rare; should have been taken close to some of the other top defensive forwards in the mid-200s (Westfall, Jarvis, Otto, Luce, Sutter, Nystrom, Pulford).

- Lloyd Cook (630). A bit of a wildcard, but sky-high potential as an offensive defenseman. Six-time PCHA all-star finished top ten in scoring (in the league, not among defensemen) six times.

TOO EARLY


- Rob Ramage (294). A bit early for an average #4 defensemen. Like I did last time with Barry Beck (what was I thinking?), I overpaid for size.

- Troy Murray (435). Edgar Laprade was still available. I was also betting on Keith Magnuson being around for my next pick.

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Old
11-06-2007, 01:18 AM
  #57
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Aurora Tigers

Coach: Harry Sinden

Wayne Cashman - Phil Esposito (C) - Ken Hodge
Joe Klukay - Adam Oates - Brett Hull
Herbie Lewis (A) - Vladimir Shadrin - Wilf Paiement
Paul Henderson - Kris Draper - Shane Doan

extras: Helmut Balderis - Ab McDonald

Chris Chelios (A) - Alexander Ragulin
Fern Flaman (A) - Jan Suchy
Ted Harris - Kevin Hatcher

extras: Glen Wesley

Tiny Thompson
Rogie Vachon



pp1: Oates, Hull, Esposito, Suchy, Hatcher
pp2: Shadrin, Lewis, Hodge, Chelios, Ragulin

pk1: Klukay, Shadrin, Chelios, Hatcher
pk2: Lewis, Draper, Flaman, Ragulin

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm very proud of my entry this year (much more so than I was in ATD 7). I think I've got two top-notch scoring lines, a great checking line, an extremely solid top-4 defence, and a ton of character throughout the lineup. I'd like to hear what you guys think. I'll start doing some write-ups of my own tommorow.


*EDIT* Self Evaluation:

Strengths:

-Offensive Punch
I always go into these drafts aiming to get two top-notch scoring lines. I think it's important to have more than one game-breaking threat offensively. I think I've definitely achieved that goal this time. My top two lines have proven excellence offensively, and my 3rd line is certainly not short on talent in that regard. While my 4th line lacks an effective playmaker, I think it has the ability to pitch in a couple goals on the counter-attack because of it's speed.

-Top 4 Defense
I was very happy to see Chelios drop to me, because I think he's a fantastic #1 in the sense that he basically covers all the bases. Great positionally, nasty to play against, good offensive game, and the ability to gobble up HUGE minutes on a nightly basis (regularly around 35:00 in his prime). I really like the stability that Ragulin and Flaman bring as my 2 and 3, and having a true rushing defenseman like Suchy was a must as my #4 (very good defensively by all account as well- excellent shot blocker). I'm planning on giving these guys a ton of minutes, and I think they can handle it.

-Defensive presence throughout
I wanted a bif of defensive presence spread throughout all my lines, and I think I managed that as best as possible. My top line has no true defensive aces, but I think the idea is more of a "best defence is a good offense" technique because they're excellent at controlling the tempo and extremely tiring to play against. I think Klukay and Oates give my second line excellent defensive ability, which allows Hull to do what he does best. Lewis and Shadrin give my 3rd line excellent speed and defensive ability, while Paiement (a very solid two-way player in his prime) keeps the opposition honest. Henderson, Draper, and Doan give me a 4th line that has a nice mix of defence, speed, and grit.

-Winning Pedigree
I'm a big believer that championships are a team accomplishment that no one player can truly be credited or blamed for. Some guys were lucky to play on great teams, some were cursed in that regard. That said, I think my team definitely knows how to win. My squad has amassed a total of 35 Stanley Cups, 19 World Championship Gold's, 7 Canada Cup/World Cup Championships, 4 Olympic Gold Medals, and has 5 players and a coach who appeared in the Summit Series (4 of them on the winning end).


Weaknesses:

-Speed up front
Although my 3rd and 4th lines have excellent speed, neither of my top two lines are particularly fast at all. I've fiddled with the idea of moving swapping Lewis and Klukay, but then my 2nd line would be missing a physical element. I think I'll leave it as is, because I especially like the Lewis-Shadrin dynamic on my 3rd.

-Tiny Thompson
He's by no means a bad goalie in this draft, but he's not in the top-tier of guys. I selected an elite backup early to try to solidify this position, but there's a number of teams that should have a goaltending advantage over mine.

-Bottom pairing defense
Didn't come out as well as I would have liked. Just kinda "meh", and certainly not a strength. I'll be aiming to limit their even strength minutes as much as possible. Luckily I have some defensemen who can eat up huge minutes (namely Chelios), so hopefully it won't be a huge issue.


Last edited by arrbez: 11-06-2007 at 04:36 PM.
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Old
11-06-2007, 01:51 AM
  #58
Nalyd Psycho
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Your 2007 Oakland Seals:

Coach: Cecil Hart
Assistant Coach: Tom Gorman
Captain: Wayne Gretzky
Alternate Captains: Valeri Vasiliev & Bruce Stuart

#8 Syd Howe - #99 "The Great One" Wayne Gretzky (C) - #9 Andy Bathgate
#90! Paul Kariya - #24 Bernie Federko - #15! Cecil Dillon
#4! Tom Phillips - #10 Edgar Laprade - #18! Frank Finnigan
#20 Jiri Holik-#19! Jack Adams-#11! Bruce Stuart (A)


#7 King Clancy - #22! Red Horner
#6 Valeri Vasiliev (A) - #12! Harry Cameron
#3! Si Griffis-#14 Mattias Norstrom


#2 Jiri Holocek
#1 Normie Smith

Press Box: #5 Billy Boucher & #14! George McNamara

PP1:Kariya-Gretzky-Bathgate-Cameron-Clancy
PP2:Howe-Federko-Dillon-Griffis-Vasiliev

PK1:Laprade-Finnigan-Vasiliev-Horner
PK2:Phillips-Howe-Griffis-Norstrom

Gouge Away

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11-06-2007, 03:41 AM
  #59
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thanks to pitseleh and GBC for reviewing our team.

my self-review:

strengths:

playoff performers. dryden was the goalie for arguably the greatest dynasty in history. his '71 playoff is 1 of the best ever.
howe led the playoffs in scoring 6 times, and was awarded a retro smythe for his record-setting performance in '55. ullman never won the cup, but he did lead the playoffs in scoring twice, and scored more in the playoffs than anyone from '63-'66. barry was the best offensive player on back-to-back champions, leading the playoffs in scoring in '37. foyston won 3 cups and averaged about 1.5 goals per game in stanley cup play in his prime. northcott was a 2-way player, but he led the '35 playoffs in both goals and points en route to a stanley cup win.

top 6 scoring. outside of northcott, who will be the digger and defensive conscience, all our top 6 are very good scorers. (although northcott has been in the top 10 in scoring a few times.)
i think foyston is a very underrated player. some might discount some of his success because he mostly played in the PCHA, but he did very well in stanley cup series vs NHA/NHL teams (he also won a cup in '14 in the NHA with toronto). he was a key player in 2 cup wins and scored about 1.5 goals per game vs lalonde's habs in both the '17 and the canceled '19 series.

1st line. howe makes any 1st line a good one, but i really like this line. we wanted all 3 members to be capable goal scorers.
ullman and howe have chemistry from playing together for many years. ullman and howe were very good 2-way players (i don't know enough about conacher), so we are comfortable with this line playing almost 1/2 the game and facing any other line.

goaltending, both playoff and regular season. dryden excelled in both the regular season and the playoffs. his '71 playoff is as impressive roy's '86 or '93. the '71 bruins had the best offense the NHL had seen, and dryden stopped them (and a very good chicago team in the finals).
kiprusoff has won the vezina and been a vezina finalist in every season as a starter. top 5 in hart voting twice. he also was a backup for several years, so that shouldn't be a problem.

defensive play throughout the lineup. jack adams stressed strong play at both ends. hitchcock always gets his teams to play strong team D.
we have no elite d-men, but we have good depth. engblom is a great spare. our d-men are a very solid group defensively, although blake tends to take himself out of position looking for a hit.

ullman, howe and northcott are all very solid defensively.
we needed a quick forward like kasper to keep up with our division's speedy forwards. westfall is one of the all time great defensive forwards. we chose leswick as much for his defense and agitating, as to keep another team from using him against howe. mcphee was very solid and a monster on the boards. sutter and flatley are good, but not great, physical defensive forwards. sutter is also great on draws.
flatley wasn't a strong pick. i have to admit that i didn't know who to pick at that point.

our PK should be very good. westfall, schoenfeld and white were all elite PKers. kasper, sutter, mcphee and leswick are also very good PKers.
and of course, the most important PKer of all is dryden.

weaknesses:

secondary scoring. other than leswick and maybe westfall, we have little scoring from our bottom 6, and not much from our d-men, other than blake and stuart. hod stuart was a very good rusher and puckhandler, but didn't play a modern game with forward passing.

lack of elite d-men. we have no harvey or even gadsby on the blueline. we will have to compensate for it by strong team D, which is hitchcock's job. of course, having dryden in net helps.

offensive d-men. i agree with GBC that our d-men are OK puck-movers, nothing spectacular, but OK. however, i think we do lack offense from the blueline.
hod stuart was great at controlling the flow of the game and was a very good rusher, but he's a bit of a question mark because he played before forward passing. blake is a good scorer from the blueline, but not really a playmaker, and he is inconsistent.
siebert had offensive ablility due to his years at LW, and finished 8th overall in assists in his MVP season, but in other seasons, he doesn't seem to have been that great offensively.


Last edited by nik jr: 11-08-2007 at 09:44 PM. Reason: typo
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11-06-2007, 04:12 AM
  #60
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The Nanaimo Clippers

Coach: Hap Day
Captain: Hap Day
Alternate Captains: Bobby Orr and Lionel Hitchman

Sweeney Schriner - Joe Primeau - Charlie Conacher
Kevin Stevens - Frank Nighbor - Ed Litzenberger
Dean Prentice - Cooney Weiland - Bobby Rousseau
Hec Kilrea - Glen Skov - Eric Nesterenko
Camille Henry

Bobby Orr - Brad McCrimmon
Lionel Conacher - Hap Day
Viktor Kuzkin - Lionel Hitchman
Gilles Marotte

Clint Benedict
Tom Barrasso
Viktor Konovalenko
I'll start with the Clippers because I consider them one of the better teams in the draft. Ok, to begin with, having two guys named Conacher on your team is frightening....just because.

This is a strong, balanced team that isn't going to be an easy matchup for anyone. Your assessment of Clint Benedict's place in history is the same as my own; I've got him towards the end of the top-10 in a small second-tier with Brimsek and Durnan. So that's a strength. In general, this is a team that plays well both ways, though I think their talent leans a bit more towards defense than offense, which should suit Hap Day's coaching style quite well.

The top line is middling. Conacher is a top-10 right wing and Shriner is a good left winger and a nice value where you picked him. In spite of chemistry with Conacher, Joe Primeau is one of the weaker 1st line centers in the draft, however, and I don't know where the "very defensively responsible" statement comes from. That statement surely applies to Frank Nighbor, but as far as I know, Primeau wasn't noted for being an unusually good backchecker. Have you got some information on Joe Primeau that I'm missing? I don't really see a backchecker on the 1st line, which is not unusual as many 1st lines lack them.

The second line is going to be tough to play against with physical wingers and arguably the greatest defensive center in NHL history, which is good because I think the offense coming from this unit will run very hot and cold. I was the first guy to criticize Kevin Stevens and I think that if your team has a weak link, he's it. Just not a long enough offensive peak (and really no peak off of Lemieux's wing) to be considered a reliable offensive producer, he's not fast and doesn't provide defense. I'm not saying he's a complete black hole - Stevens will have his moments and Nighbor will give him some good passes - but he is your one truly weak pick, in my opinion.

The third line is a strong 2-way unit. Even throwing out the outlier Art Ross, Cooney Weiland is one of the better 2-way third line centers in the league, and was a good pick even if he cost you Frank Finnigan. All three of your third liners, in addition to being solid defensive players, had nice (though brief) little offensive spikes and can be expected to provide secondary scoring to go along with good checking. There are a number of strong 3rd lines in the league (and some relatively high picks invested in manning them); I've got yours in the second half of the top-10.

The 4th line is nice and solid, not breathtaking, but a unit that should perform it's function ably. One comment I will make is that Eric Nesterenko may be miscast as a 4th line player. Pelletier's bio on him raises some real questions about character and about how he'll feel playing on a grind line. He was very vocal in Toronto about how unhappy he was with Imlach's restrictive system, although to his credit, he did develop into a good defensive forward in Chicago, though it appears he wasn't well-loved by the coaching staff there, as well. Anyway, pappy can probably shed some more light on the subject, but it's something to think about. Nesterenko may be better used on Weiland's wing than on Skov's.

The defense is very good, though I think you might have been better off investing in a true shutdown partner for Bobby Orr, especially given how much offensive responsibility Bobby is going to have. McCrimmon is good in his own zone for a 2nd pairing guy, but on a first pairing playing huge minutes next to Bobby against blazing fast top lines (McCrimmon was an above-average, but not great skater), he's going to get picked on. You could move Conacher up to play with Orr, but I wouldn't put transition defense at the top of Lionel's abilities, either, and that's what you need more than anything.

If you had Harry Howell's combination of skating, positioning and shotblocking lined up next to Orr to break up 2-on-1's against, I wouldn't really know how to attack that pairing, but as it is, you don't have a good foil for Bobby in transition defense. Orr + McCrimmon or Conacher will be very strong in their own zone breaking up cycles or whatnot, but as Gerry Cheevers can tell you, great as Bobby Orr was (and as much as he hustled to get back into the play from behind), he did leave his partner and his goalie to their own devices more than perhaps his reputation would suggest. No one watches the highlites of Orr getting stripped of the puck and the other team going back the other way for an odd-man rush against, but it was known to happen.

I think Orr is unarguably the greatest player in hockey history (short peak notwithstanding), but he can't be in two places at once and against a counterattacking team that can pass the puck up ice faster than Orr can skate back into the play, McCrimmon is going to have his hands full. But that is picking nits (all teams have them); the defense is one of the better units in the league and they're backed by Clint Benedict, so it's not like there's a weakness here - more like a potential strength that didn't materialize.

It may seem like I spent most of my time criticizing Nanaimo, but that's because I think the team's strengths largely go without saying. At any rate, I've got the Clippers in the top-5 of the league, though the Bob Cole is a tough division.

*edit: ahh...you got the bit about Primeau's defensive prowess from Pelletier's site. Ok, fair enough. The knock on Primeau remains, however, that his career and peak were both very short. He had three top-10 points finishes in the league (once more 7th in assists) on the best offense of the era, and that's it. Given how Joe's play fell off in his last two seasons, the argument that early retirement somehow cut short his peak years doesn't hold water (much like the argument that Ace Bailey lost peak years when Eddie Shore tried to kill him - both players had already clearly fallen off before they were out of hockey). Primeau appears to have the talent of at least an average 1st liner, but he's also not a guy I'd expect consistent production out of. Nanaimo's offense is, in general, going to be pretty streaky, in my opinion.*


Last edited by Sturminator: 11-06-2007 at 04:37 AM.
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11-06-2007, 07:18 AM
  #61
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Originally Posted by God Bless Canada View Post
Preamble:


First line: It's been labelled the best built first line by a couple GMs already, and a former draft champion (HO) and a guy who actually watched the Bentley's play (pappy).
Hey, I may be old but I am not that old. Bentley's are before my time. All I have seen is some Max highlights on an old AS game film. Do like them though.

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11-06-2007, 07:24 AM
  #62
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GUELPH BILTMORES

Coach: Badger Bob Johnson



Bobby Hull(A)-Frank Boucher-Vaclav Nedomansky
Sid Smith-Ted Kennedy (C)-Bill Mosienko
Gaye Stewart-Orland Kurtenbach-Fleming Mackell
Don Marshall-Fred Stanfield-Jerry Toppazzini
Frank McGee

Carl Brewer-Earl Seibert(A)
Doug Mohns-Art Coulter
Lars-Erik Sjoberg-Nel Colville
Tom Anderson

Chuck Rayner
Al Rollins
Charlie Hodge


[First PP Unit

Bobby Hull-Frank Boucher-Vaclav Nedomansky
Lars-Erik Sjoberg-Fred Stanfield


second PP Unit

Sid Smith-Ted Kennedy-Bill Mosienko
Doug Mohns-Jerry Toppazzini


first Pk Unit

Don Marshall-Jerry Toppazzini
Carl Brewer-Earl Seibert


second Pk Unit

Bobby Hull-Ted Kennedy
Doug Mohns-Art Coulter


Fire away

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11-06-2007, 08:43 AM
  #63
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Montreal Wanderers

Coach: Roger Neilson

Reg Noble - Joe Sakic (A) - Pavel Bure
Rick Martin - Gilbert Perreault - René Robert
Al Secord - Denis Savard - Steve Larmer
Yvon Lambert - Dave Poulin (A) - Tony Amonte

J.C. Tremblay - Butch Bouchard (C)
Leo Reise Jr. - Flash Hollett
Barry Beck - Red Dutton (A)

Terry Sawchuk
Pelle Lindbergh

PP1: Martin - Sakic - Bure - Tremblay - Hollett
PP2: Secord - Savard - Larmer - Perreault- Bouchard
PK1: Poulin - Larmer - Tremblay - Bouchard
PK2: Sakic - Noble - Reise Jr. - Dutton
Working my way through the teams based on when they posted them.

Strengths
  • Love the 1st, 2nd and 3rd lines. We know precisely what you're going to get from them.
  • PK units look to be rock solid. I'm a huge Dave Poulin fan, the combo of Poulin and Larmer should be a shut-down type of unit

Weaknesses
  • Not sure what to make of your defense corps. There are some prominent names, but no one that really pops out at me as being your go-to guy. I'm unsure of your 2nd unit, will Hollett and Reise Jr. make a good pairing? I presonally couldn't say yes or no.
  • Size. Welcome to my world. Your team is equally small if not smaller. Secord and Lambert are your only legitimate sizeable players. Larmer isn't a cream-puff but he won't intimidate anyone either.
  • Amonte on the 4th line. Not sure if he's there to be the offensive component of the line or a shut down type of player. Either way it's not a great fit IMO.
  • Lindbergh might not be a good back-up. Career was too short, could have been great, could have been the next flash-in-the-pan goalie.

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11-06-2007, 09:30 AM
  #64
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Quote:
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General Managers: nik jr. and Agent Dale Cooper
Head Coach: Jack Adams
Assistant Coach: Ken Hitchcock
#8 Roy Conacher-#16 Norm Ullman-#9 Gordie Howe (C)
#14 Lawrence Northcott-#7 Marty Barry-#5 Frank Foyston
#35 Mike Mcphee-#11 Steve Kasper-#18 Ed Westfall (A)
#17 Tony Leswick-#12 Ron Sutter-#26 Patrick Flatley

#1 Albert "Babe" Siebert (A)-#4 Rob "Buzzard" Blake
#3 William "Hod" Stuart (A)-#2 Bill White
#6 Jim Schoenfeld-#15 Jim "Chief" Nielson
X-#27 Mike Murphy, #13 Brian Engblom

Strengths
  • Two very good shut down lines. Big fan of the 3rd line. Kasper was a very good shutdown center. Not elite, mind you, but very good. Westfall, however, should be noted as one of the premier shadows
  • First line has a bit of everything. Scoring, toughness, defensive responsibility. I would imagine you could match them up with any of the other team's first line and not be worried about either their productivity or their defensive play.

Weaknesses
  • Not a tonne of pop out of that lineup. You'll need to rely on solid defensive play and timely scoring to win games.
  • Defense is a mixed bag of nuts. Good defensively, not sure about their offensive potential
  • Where the heck are your goalies?

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11-06-2007, 09:39 AM
  #65
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Thanks for the review Sturminator, it's appreciated.

McCrimmon with Orr was one of my concerns. Hitchman will definitely be moving up a fair bit to help out on Orr's pairing. He played the same role with Shore, so he may be better suited to the last-man-back type situation. Or maybe I'll have Day become Orr's partner and move McCrimmon down to play with Conacher.

I'll have to consider the pairings a little more.


Last edited by pitseleh: 11-06-2007 at 09:50 AM.
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11-06-2007, 09:46 AM
  #66
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Wayne Merrick isn't a bad option, either.
However, can Merrick play RW? We assume Dunderdale can (he was a rover at some point), but ultimately, Merrick wouldn't change the line modus operandi that much, as Dunderdale would.
Thanks for the info, GBC, HO and MXD. Will evaluate the situation with your comments.

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11-06-2007, 10:00 AM
  #67
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The 4th line is nice and solid, not breathtaking, but a unit that should perform it's function ably. One comment I will make is that Eric Nesterenko may be miscast as a 4th line player. Pelletier's bio on him raises some real questions about character and about how he'll feel playing on a grind line. He was very vocal in Toronto about how unhappy he was with Imlach's restrictive system, although to his credit, he did develop into a good defensive forward in Chicago, though it appears he wasn't well-loved by the coaching staff there, as well. Anyway, pappy can probably shed some more light on the subject, but it's something to think about. Nesterenko may be better used on Weiland's wing than on Skov's.
Nesterenko never played for Imlach. His last year in Toronto was 55-56. clancy was the coach during his time there. I wasn't aware that he critized the way Leafs utilized him but I can see why the Leafs grinding style of play would stymie a young player. Nester was very outspoken. He also critized Rudy Pilous's coaching ability. He did however settle down to a long career as a checking RW. I kbow he effectively shadowed the Big M at times. I think he is an absolutely good fit on a grinder line and would have a good fit with Skov as they would have killed penalties together on the Hawks.

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11-06-2007, 10:36 AM
  #68
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[QUOTE=arrbez;11085391][CENTER]Aurora Tigers

Coach: Harry Sinden

Wayne Cashman - Phil Esposito (C) - Ken Hodge
Joe Klukay - Adam Oates - Brett Hull
Herbie Lewis (A) - Vladimir Shadrin - Wilf Paiement
Paul Henderson - Kris Draper - Shane Doan

extras: Helmut Balderis - Ab McDonald

Chris Chelios (A) - Alexander Ragulin
Fern Flaman (A) - Jan Suchy
Ted Harris - Kevin Hatcher

extras: Glen Wesley

Tiny Thompson
Rogie Vachon



You have one of the best team of the draft. Your first line was top 5 line in the 70's. Espo was the ultimate slotman. He sure knew how to score, even with one or two players on his back. Cashman was the mucker and grinder, extremely useful in tight situations. He was tough both with his fists and elbows. Hodge benefited greatly by playing alongside Cash & Espo. He wasn't a bad player but the fit with his linemates was the ultimate reward for him. Great job reuniting these guys. Your second line is as good or probably better than your first line. You have one of the best duo's of the draft with the "Hull n Oates" tandem. Klukay brings a hard work ethic and defensive abilities that should let these 2 guys work their magic. I think Herbie Lewis and Klukay are both interchangable but putting Lewis on your second line might not be a bad idea also. Shadrin is the perfect third line center, defensive wiz and master of penalty killing. He would have more offensive value playing alongside Yakushev instead of Paiement, altough Paiment brings some toughness and goal scoring abilities. Paiement might be better suited for 4th line duties. Great 4th line.

Your top 4 defense is as good as any top 4 in the draft.
They have it all, size, skills, toughness. Good job.

Because you went all out on offense and defense, you do not have a top 10 goalie but a very good one. However, you have one of the best second goalies of the draft and drafted him early to compliment Thompson.

I dont know who is in your division, but nice looking team.
I would change your PP and PK units:

pp1: Cashman, Espo, Hodge, Suchy, Chelios
pp2: Lewis, Oates, Hull, Hatcher, Ragulin

pk1: Klukay, Shadrin, Chelios Ragulin
pk2: Lewis, Draper, Flaman, Harris


Last edited by LapierreSports: 11-06-2007 at 10:44 AM.
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11-06-2007, 10:43 AM
  #69
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Aurora Tigers

Coach: Harry Sinden

Wayne Cashman - Phil Esposito (C) - Ken Hodge
Joe Klukay - Adam Oates - Brett Hull
Herbie Lewis (A) - Vladimir Shadrin - Wilf Paiement
Paul Henderson - Kris Draper - Shane Doan

extras: Helmut Balderis - Ab McDonald

Chris Chelios (A) - Alexander Ragulin
Fern Flaman (A) - Jan Suchy
Ted Harris - Kevin Hatcher

extras: Glen Wesley

Tiny Thompson
Rogie Vachon



pp1: Oates, Hull, Esposito, Suchy, Hatcher
pp2: Shadrin, Lewis, Hodge, Chelios, Ragulin

pk1: Klukay, Shadrin, Chelios, Hatcher
pk2: Lewis, Oates, Flaman, Ragulin



You have one of the best team of the draft. Your first line was top 5 line in the 70's. Espo was the ultimate slotman. He sure knew how to score, even with one or two players on his back. Cashman was the mucker and grinder, extremely useful in tight situations. He was tough both with his fists and elbows. Hodge benefited greatly by playing alongside Cash & Espo. He wasn't a bad player but the fit with his linemates was the ultimate reward for him. Great job reuniting these guys. Your second line is as good or probably better than your first line. You have one of the best duo's of the draft with the "Hull n Oates" tandem. Klukay brings a hard work ethic and defensive abilities that should let these 2 guys work their magic. I think Herbie Lewis and Klukay are both interchangable but putting Lewis on your second line might not be a bad idea also. Shadrin is the perfect third line center, defensive wiz and master of penalty killing. He would have more offensive value playing alongside Yakushev instead of Paiement, altough Paiment brings some toughness and goal scoring abilities. Paiement might be better suited for 4th line duties. Great 4th line.

Your top 4 defense is as good as any top 4 in the draft.
They have it all, size, skills, toughness. Good job.

Because you went all out on offense and defense, you do not have a top 10 goalie but a very good one. However, you have one of the best second goalies of the draft and drafted him early to compliment Thompson.

I dont know who is in your division, but nice looking team.
My pick (besides myself obviously ) to take the cup. You put together quite the team there arrbez. It's gonna take a helluva good team to take you down.

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11-06-2007, 10:54 AM
  #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LapierreSports View Post
pp1: Cashman, Espo, Hodge, Suchy, Chelios
pp2: Lewis, Oates, Hull, Hatcher, Ragulin

pk1: Klukay, Shadrin, Chelios Ragulin
pk2: Lewis, Draper, Flaman, Harris
Thanks for then nice words guys.

I really wasn't sure what to do with my special teams. It's always great to have two good PP units, but on the other hand, I was drooling over the idea of Oates-Hull-Esposito. It just seemed so cool to have one of the best playmakers ever with the greatest one-timer ever and the greatest crease-man ever. But yeah, I can see the value of mixing it up as well, since my #2 unit wouldn't be anything to write home about. I think I'll definitely keep Hatcher on the #1 PP unit. He was better than Chelios in the regard IMO, and has a cannon of a shot. One of the reasons I drafted Hatcher was to play heavy minutes on special teams, both of which he was excellent at. He won't get a whole lot of time even strength, and this let's me rest some of my stud defenders a little more.

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11-06-2007, 11:04 AM
  #71
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Thanks for then nice words guys.

I really wasn't sure what to do with my special teams. It's always great to have two good PP units, but on the other hand, I was drooling over the idea of Oates-Hull-Esposito. It just seemed so cool to have one of the best playmakers ever with the greatest one-timer ever and the greatest crease-man ever. But yeah, I can see the value of mixing it up as well, since my #2 unit wouldn't be anything to write home about. I think I'll definitely keep Hatcher on the #1 PP unit. He was better than Chelios in the regard IMO, and has a cannon of a shot. One of the reasons I drafted Hatcher was to play heavy minutes on special teams, both of which he was excellent at. He won't get a whole lot of time even strength, and this let's me rest some of my stud defenders a little more.
The Hull-Oates-Espo line would arguably be the best powerplay trio in the draft, but with the lack of scoring depth your team has after the first two lines, which is one of the only knocks I can see with your team, it would leave your 2nd unit questionable, like you said. However, a line like this would definetely be in order if you were down a goal late, or in need of a boost at some point in the game, as they would be a surefire scoring threat whenever they touched the ice.

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11-06-2007, 11:09 AM
  #72
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added self evaluation to my own above.

I'll start on mine later today, will go division by division.

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11-06-2007, 11:27 AM
  #73
LapierreSports
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vancityluongo View Post
We've already got a few reviews...but I'll post our lineup here for anyone else kind enough to give us more feedback:


Winnipeg Jets

Coach: Lester Patrick

#4 Aurel Joliat - #16 Pat LaFontaine - #68 Jaromir Jagr
#20 Luc Robitaille - #15 Bobby Smith - #7 Rod Gilbert
#17 Don McKenney - #37 Mike Peca - #12 Duane Sutter
#22 Jay Pandolfo - #21 John Madden - #11 Ryan Walter
#96 Thomas Holmstrom

#18 Serge Savard - #6 Phil Housley
#3 Ken Daneyko - #19 Terry Harper
#44 Graham Drinkwater - #8 Barclay Plager
#23 Mathieu Schneider

#30 Martin Brodeur
#27 Ron Hextall
#1 Kirk McLean

The first thing that comes to mind when I see your lineup is that your team lacks scoring, especially from the center position. I would be pissed if Bobby Smith was my 2nd line center in an all time draft and Lafontaine my first line center. This is the price you pay for drafting Jagr in the first round. A lot of people have made a much bigger deal of what it should be concerning that pick but this explains the lack at center. By the way, I dont have a problem where you picked Jagr. But then you went the Brodeur route which is also ok... I am huge fan of Joliat which everyone would be happy to have as a 1st line LW. The 3rd and 4th line will bring zero offense but they are nice two- way lines. Combined that with a defensive defense and a top 10 goalie of all time and you have a team that will rely heavily on shutting down the opposition. Good luck !

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Old
11-06-2007, 11:36 AM
  #74
reckoning
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Ottawa 67s

Head Coach: Mike Keenan

Paul Thompson - Syl Apps - Reggie Leach
Patrik Elias - Ron Francis - Ken Wharram
Dan Maloney - Ken Linseman - Kevin Dineen
Marty Pavelich - Gregg Sheppard - Jere Lehtinen

Jimmy Roberts
Marc Tardif

Bob Goldham - Eddie Shore
Ken Reardon - Ian Turnbull
Mike Ramsey - Ron Stackhouse
Rod Seiling

Bernie Parent
Roberto Luongo

Captain: Syl Apps
Alternates: Eddie Shore, Paul Thompson

PP Units:
Thompson- Francis- Leach- Shore- Stackhouse
Elias- Apps- Dineen- Reardon- Turnbull

SH Units:
Pavelich- Sheppard- Goldham- Ramsey
Francis- Lehtinen- Reardon- Shore



Can somebody please do me?

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Old
11-06-2007, 11:42 AM
  #75
God Bless Canada
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I don't think scoring is an issue with Winnipeg. The first line will score in bushels. LaFontaine's a lower tier first line centre (I think he's better off as a No. 2), but he's got linemates who are top 10 all-time, arguably top five, at their respective positions.

And I think you underrate Bobby Smith. In a 28-team draft, he's definitely good enough to be a No. 2 centre. He's not in that upper tier of second line centres, but his size, stickhandling and toughness make him a good No. 2. And he's in the top 20 all-time for post-season scoring. That counts. He should be fine working with Gilbert and Robitaille. Smith will also open up room for them.

The third and fourth lines won't score much, although Peca has that big-game mentality, and Ryan Walter isn't a slouch in the offensive zone. I don't think Walter's a stretch in the fourth line role. Very smart player in his own zone.

I do have concerns about scoring from the back end. Once you get past Housley and Savard, it dries up in a hurry. Savard was never a big point producer, but his talent is undeniable. Daneyko, Plager and Harper are rock-solid (especially Harper), but I have doubts about their ability to move the puck. That's where Schneider will come in handy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LapierreSports View Post
The first thing that comes to mind when I see your lineup is that your team lacks scoring, especially from the center position. I would be pissed if Bobby Smith was my 2nd line center in an all time draft and Lafontaine my first line center. This is the price you pay for drafting Jagr in the first round. A lot of people have made a much bigger deal of what it should be concerning that pick but this explains the lack at center. By the way, I dont have a problem where you picked Jagr. But then you went the Brodeur route which is also ok... I am huge fan of Joliat which everyone would be happy to have as a 1st line LW. The 3rd and 4th line will bring zero offense but they are nice two- way lines. Combined that with a defensive defense and a top 10 goalie of all time and you have a team that will rely heavily on shutting down the opposition. Good luck !

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