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Old
11-04-2007, 02:45 PM
  #1
kac1
 
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Stick Help

I am usually the type who reads these forums and never posts but you guys seem to give a lot of good advice. I am a 24 yr old female. I started playing about 2 years ago in just local drop in sessions and have never had any actual coaching which leads to my question. I am currently using a one piece Bauer Vapor Velocity stick that was given to me but I am not sure what the curve is on it. What type of curve is the best for someone fairly new to the game? I mostly play left wing.

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11-04-2007, 03:31 PM
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SSM12
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I find it depends, what are your strengths? A deeper curve is better for stickhandling but your backhands won't be that well, and your wristshots wont be that accurate but they will have some speed. More open is a little better for accuracy, both wristshot and backhand.

For a beginner, the most common flex would be around 87
Anything with an "open wedge" looking curve will get the puck in the air easily. It really depends on what you feel like playing to, I have a Naslund curve which is good for stickhandling and shooting. A more open face will help with shooting from my experience

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11-04-2007, 03:51 PM
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I found out that the curve I am using is a Lindros.

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11-04-2007, 04:22 PM
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Lindros is pretty neutral which is a good start. That way you can go from the neutral and see if you want something with more of a wedge or something with a closed faced even. But more important than just the curve is the lie of the stick...if the angle of the blade is wrong the puck is going to be going under your blade and you'll miss passes or your shots will go fluttering.

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11-04-2007, 04:55 PM
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Thanks for the advice. I have been looking at a Sakic curve that has a lie of 5.5. Would that be a good beginner's curve as well? The stick I was looking at was only 65 flex..is that to small? I looked at the blade of my current stick and there seems to be more wear on the heel than anywhere else. Since you mentioned passes I have been having problems keeping the puck on my stick when receiving a pass. It usually tips right off of my stick. Any advice?


Last edited by kac1: 11-04-2007 at 06:12 PM.
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11-04-2007, 06:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kac1 View Post
Thanks for the advice. I have been looking at a Sakic curve that has a lie of 5.5. Would that be a good beginner's curve as well? I looked at the blade of my current stick and there seems to be more wear on the heel than anywhere else. Since you mentioned passes I have been having problems keeping the puck on my stick when receiving a pass. It usually tips right off of my stick. Any advice?
Sakic is a great curve if you want/have a great wrist shot. Very big curve on it. Very similar to the Naslund curve. Again, great for stick handling and shooting wrist shots. Won't get much of a slapshot with it, however...

Sorry if I'm being a dick here, but receiving a puck has alot to do with you, not so much the curve of the stick. I can receive a puck with just about any curve. BUT, if you go with a Sakic curve, it may just help you. Because of the big curve, the puck may just sit right into the blade. But again, it has more to do with you than the stick.

When you recieve a pass, try being your stick back right before you get the puck so that the puck doesnt just slap against your blade. Think of it like the Might Ducks movie. If you pass an egg and you recieve it without moving your stick, it'll likely break cause of how fast its going into a wall. Cradling the puck into your stick will help from the puck bouncing off your blade and away.

Hoped that helped.

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11-04-2007, 06:57 PM
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great advice..thanks a lot. I was thinking about getting the Synergy 200 with the Sakic curve in intermediate. I am just worried about the flex (65). I am only about
5'5" so I don't think I should go with the senior stick with 95 flex. Correct me if I am wrong.

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11-04-2007, 07:12 PM
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It depends how much you lean into your shots, I have a prostock Semin easton stick which is 110, and a NB Naslun stick which is 102, I dont really notice much of a difference, but if you feel you can get enough power behind it, 95 would be alright. 65 will be easier to bend, which could be good if you arent that great with putting power/weight behind the shot because it will bend easier, giving you more whip. Whats the flex on your Lindros one? if you feel comfortable, try to find something similar to that. I normally recommend lower flexes for those starting out, although if you use a higher flex rating it can help develop the proper weight transfer in the shots. I would say find something similar to that Lindros or maybe go with the 65 till you get a little more comfortable with shooting and what not.

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11-04-2007, 07:57 PM
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There's a few things to consider.

Personally, I think the three most important things to consider in a stick are flex, lie, and curve in that order.

With flex, you will probably want something light. I'm a 5'8" 170 pound guy and I use a 75 flex stick. You would probably want something between 65 and 75 flex at your height as a beginner if you aren't terribly strong. If you are heavier and/or have a strong upper body, then bump it up to the 85 flex if that's what's comfortable. The idea is to find a stick that you can get to function like a whip, adding speed to your shots.

Lie is the angle of your blade relative to the stick. The higher the lie, the closer to a right angle (90 degree) of the shaft when the blade is resting flat on the ice. If you skate upright, you generally want a higher lie, and if you skate with your knees bent and body low to the ice, you generally want a lower lie. The easy way to figure out lie is to look at your tape on the bottom of the blade after a game. If it wears more towards the heel, you should find a lower lie. If it wears more towards the toe, you should find a higher lie. If the wear is even, you are using the correct lie. And by using the correct lie, it is easier (more natural) to pass/receive passes and shoot.

With the curve, it's very much preference. The more open the face, the higher your shots will go, and the more curve, the more spin and velocity on the puck. But, a face too open or too much curve, and the puck is difficult to control. Personally, I feel that a 1/2" or less mid curve (like a P88 Lindros, Iginla, or similar) or mid-heel curve (like a Forsberg, PM9 St Louis, or similar) are the easiest to learn. It encourages proper follow through and technique for your shots but is easy enough to use as a beginner.

Personally, I like curves similar to the Lindros, and I just picked up a Mission L-2 75 flex with the Hull pattern blades at Hockey Giant. Loving it so far. I also have a Bauer Endure with Lindros curve in 77 flex, which is a little stiffer.

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11-04-2007, 09:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kac1 View Post
great advice..thanks a lot. I was thinking about getting the Synergy 200 with the Sakic curve in intermediate. I am just worried about the flex (65). I am only about
5'5" so I don't think I should go with the senior stick with 95 flex. Correct me if I am wrong.
You should be in a intermediate stick (around 60-70 flex).

A senior stick is probably a bit too tall and the flex may be a bit much if you arent that strong of a person. Cutting down a senior stick will only cause the flex to get stiffer, which is no good.

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11-05-2007, 10:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kac1 View Post
great advice..thanks a lot. I was thinking about getting the Synergy 200 with the Sakic curve in intermediate. I am just worried about the flex (65). I am only about
5'5" so I don't think I should go with the senior stick with 95 flex. Correct me if I am wrong.
You are correct if the heel is wearing out more, then you'd want a lower lie. Lindros is a 6 I do believe.

Sakic is a nice curve, it is open so you will get some good lift out of it (but don't use it as a crutch though). There isn't one curve that is conductive to anything as long as you got the skills...but you can always get a wood stick with that curve and re-curve it to however you like if you find it too open, etc and then use that as template whenever you go shopping for a nicer stick or new blade.

And flex, though it's not the end all solution, but take your weight and divide it in half and you'll get a flex you might want to try...but like I say it's not the perfect solution as some ppl might prefer something even flexier or a tad stiffer. I mean, I think Brett Hull was using something like a 65 or 70. Keep in mind, that if you hack off the top of the stick you add flex and change the lie too. 1 inch adds up to like 4 flex I believe.

And skip the Synergy 200, it's about as heavy as a wood stick...maybe even heavier than a nice wood stick like a one60.

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11-05-2007, 10:46 AM
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For a beginner you want a smaller curve, the smaller the curve the better. You want to get the proper form for shooting and then you can find a curve that works with your shot... You don't want a shot that works with your curve. At this point a larger curve would just be a crutch.

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11-05-2007, 10:50 AM
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Thanks a lot for the help everyone. sc37 do you have any suggestions on specific sticks with the Sakic curve? Or is that to much of a curve to start out with? I would prefer to spend $100 or less. The heel is wearing out on my Lindros which is why I want to go with a lower lie.

*edit - I wasn't exactly clear on this, but I am not really a beginner as far as shooting goes. I do have a pretty good wrist shot now. My main problem is keeping a pass on my stick when someone passes to me. Obviously that is not because of the stick.


Last edited by kac1: 11-05-2007 at 11:14 AM.
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11-05-2007, 11:15 AM
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Usually I recommend people get a shaft and blade combo if they have under $100 to spend, and intermediate saves even more money.

A good combination would be a One90 intermediate shaft ($65 from Hockey Giant) and a TPS R4 Nash blade ($20 from HG). That will be a pretty good combo that should be balanced and well under $100. Plus, if you don't like the curve, you can pick up a different blade. The One90 is supposed to be very durable and good performance.

Ah, just saw your last edit. I would recommend getting a golf ball and/or a Smart Hockey ball and do some stickhandling drills. The golf ball especially helps develop soft hands. Wood blades are heavier and softer than composite and make passes somewhat easier to catch. And as far as the Sakic, you will have to adjust your technique, otherwise your shots will be much higher. It's actually a somewhat tricky blade to use, really useful for shooting from close to the net, not as useful otherwise.

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11-05-2007, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kac1 View Post
Thanks a lot for the help everyone. sc37 do you have any suggestions on specific sticks with the Sakic curve? Or is that to much of a curve to start out with? I would prefer to spend $100 or less. The heel is wearing out on my Lindros which is why I want to go with a lower lie.

*edit - I wasn't exactly clear on this, but I am not really a beginner as far as shooting goes. I do have a pretty good wrist shot now. My main problem is keeping a pass on my stick when someone passes to me. Obviously that is not because of the stick.
If you are having trouble receiving passes then your correct that has little to do with the blade. Do you tape your blade? If so try adding wax, that should help a little. Otherwise its really just making sure you receive it properly, if you catch the pass too high on your blade or too low its just going to slide off, if its a tough pass in your skates spread your legs out and drop your lower hand to receive it. It just comes with practice.

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11-05-2007, 11:38 AM
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Yeah, I do tape my stick..but like you said it just comes with practice

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11-05-2007, 11:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
There's a few things to consider.

Personally, I think the three most important things to consider in a stick are flex, lie, and curve in that order.

With flex, you will probably want something light. I'm a 5'8" 170 pound guy and I use a 75 flex stick. You would probably want something between 65 and 75 flex at your height as a beginner if you aren't terribly strong. If you are heavier and/or have a strong upper body, then bump it up to the 85 flex if that's what's comfortable. The idea is to find a stick that you can get to function like a whip, adding speed to your shots.

Lie is the angle of your blade relative to the stick. The higher the lie, the closer to a right angle (90 degree) of the shaft when the blade is resting flat on the ice. If you skate upright, you generally want a higher lie, and if you skate with your knees bent and body low to the ice, you generally want a lower lie. The easy way to figure out lie is to look at your tape on the bottom of the blade after a game. If it wears more towards the heel, you should find a lower lie. If it wears more towards the toe, you should find a higher lie. If the wear is even, you are using the correct lie. And by using the correct lie, it is easier (more natural) to pass/receive passes and shoot.

With the curve, it's very much preference. The more open the face, the higher your shots will go, and the more curve, the more spin and velocity on the puck. But, a face too open or too much curve, and the puck is difficult to control. Personally, I feel that a 1/2" or less mid curve (like a P88 Lindros, Iginla, or similar) or mid-heel curve (like a Forsberg, PM9 St Louis, or similar) are the easiest to learn. It encourages proper follow through and technique for your shots but is easy enough to use as a beginner.

Personally, I like curves similar to the Lindros, and I just picked up a Mission L-2 75 flex with the Hull pattern blades at Hockey Giant. Loving it so far. I also have a Bauer Endure with Lindros curve in 77 flex, which is a little stiffer.
I'd say it's lie, curve, flex. Flex is the one thing you can work around.

I'm 5' 9" 150lbs and I use an 87 flex. I can't play with anything lower then an 85. I think flex ends up being personal preference. Which I why I don't think it's as important as blade lie. Let's face it, we've probably all tossed perfectly good sticks because the lie was wrong.

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11-05-2007, 12:19 PM
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I am really stuck on what curve to choose. I definitely need a lie lower than 6 since the wear is all on the heel. I am not even sure what the flex is on it since it has been cut and it is a senior stick.

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11-05-2007, 12:34 PM
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I am really stuck on what curve to choose. I definitely need a lie lower than 6 since the wear is all on the heel. I am not even sure what the flex is on it since it has been cut and it is a senior stick.
Go with a mild to medium mid curve with a slightly open face. The blade tool at epuck.com is a good source of info. It's off on the right hand side of this page.

http://www.epuck.com/webapp/wcs/stor...egory_rn=1803#

For lie, try a 5 or even a 4.

Depending on your weight you might be able to use an intermediate stick. It will have a smaller shaft and comes shorter in length so you don't have to cut much off. If you go with an adult stick. I wouldn't go over 80-85 for a flex rating since you'll end up cutting it down. Which will only make the stick stiffer.

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11-05-2007, 02:00 PM
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great, thanks for your help..I will check out that link later.

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11-05-2007, 02:11 PM
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I think the easton heatley curve would be great for you. I also agree with others in here that said a intermediate would be a good thing for you to try. I am 5'10 175lbs and i use a 75 flex shaft.

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11-05-2007, 03:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kac1 View Post
Thanks a lot for the help everyone. sc37 do you have any suggestions on specific sticks with the Sakic curve? Or is that to much of a curve to start out with? I would prefer to spend $100 or less. The heel is wearing out on my Lindros which is why I want to go with a lower lie.

*edit - I wasn't exactly clear on this, but I am not really a beginner as far as shooting goes. I do have a pretty good wrist shot now. My main problem is keeping a pass on my stick when someone passes to me. Obviously that is not because of the stick.
I personally don't think Sakic is too drastic of a curve, but it is open so it's semi-cheating to get your shot up. But if you have a good handle on a shot, sounds like you do, and it meets your requirements give it a try. Sakic would help with the wear on your heel too cause it's got a decent rocker on the bottom of it.

Keeping the pass on the stick is all apart of you needing to develop a little touch. Using these composites doesn't help very much since they are a bit bouncey and lack some feel to them. Best suggestion is to go and find some Easton Z-Carbon wood sticks with the Sakic curve or take Jarick's suggestion and get a two-piece stick. Both of thse would be cheaper in the long run too if you decide the Sakic isn't for you and with the two piece option it'll cost you only like $10-15 for a different wood blade to slap in there. I personally do this myself....use a Easton Ultra Lite with a wood blade. Great feel and good overall performance and durability. I don't believe they make a intermeditate in the Ultra Lite, but the one90 does sound like good alternative. Plus, it'll be a top end shaft for about the same price as a Synergy 200 which is the lowest model Easton has in terms of OPS.

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11-05-2007, 07:35 PM
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What do you guys think of the Synergy 300 or 350 stick?

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11-05-2007, 07:55 PM
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Not much better than the 200 IMO. They felt pretty decent, but your not going to get the greatest performance or feel from it. Really, you oughta look into a two piece with a wood blade and develop that touch. Or if you reallllly want an OPS, look at some closeouts from last year. Check out some of the TPS models out there that are going cheap...like the Adrenaline. Top of the line stick, and saw them going for like $79 at times.

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11-06-2007, 07:48 AM
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What curve in the TPS line is close to the Sakic in the Easton?

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