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OT - Hockey Advice Needed

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Old
01-22-2004, 12:19 AM
  #1
Necrophile
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OT - Hockey Advice Needed

Hi everyone.

I wanted some hockey-related advice so I thought I'd ask around on this forum.

Background: I played organized hockey until I was about 11. I quit then, and started to play again 2 years ago on exterior rinks. I'm now in my early twenties. This season, I've been getting a lot of practice (~10 hrs / wk) on the rinks to get in better shape (I already rode the bike all summer - and winter). I've also been working on my skills.

All this is mostly to prepare for next summer and fall, when I plan on joining a garage league. However, I realize that playing ice hockey and shinny hockey aren't the same, and don't require the same skills. I'm going to give you a "player profile" of myself, and I'd like for you to suggest to me what I need to work on in order to become a better player within an organized, non-contact league.


Position: Left-handed defenseman, know how to play wing as well.

Strengths: Good speed, not great though. Good at winning board battles. Very good at anticipating and blocking passes. Almost unbeatable on 1-on-1 when I'm the defenseman. Good at getting into a position to receive a pass, except near the opposing net. Good at making accurate passes. Good at controlling the puck, even at high speed. Good at making a play behind the net (off or def zone).

Weaknesses: Weak shot, and I have trouble with quick execution - only my one-timer is respectable. I'm not good at deking 1-on-1, except if I can use my speed or the boards go around. Not willing to get in front of a slapshot. Also, when I have the puck, I take too much time to find an open player, and since I'm aware of this, I sometimes panic with the puck and either 1) play it along the boards hoping a teammate can catch the pass, or 2) try to deke the player who's putting pressure on me to buy more time, which can be a risk since as a defenseman I'm usually the last man back. I think the last weakness is my biggest problem.


OK, your call. Am I overlooking anything that I haven't mentioned, like some other skill I should have? I want to know what I need to improve or be aware of during a game situation. Also, what type of defenseman would I play best (offensive, defensive etc). And finally, what kind of forward would I make, and what would I need to improve if I wanted to play wing? Thanks in advance for your help.

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01-22-2004, 01:32 AM
  #2
#44_delivers
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Necrophile
Hi everyone.

I wanted some hockey-related advice so I thought I'd ask around on this forum.

Background: I played organized hockey until I was about 11. I quit then, and started to play again 2 years ago on exterior rinks. I'm now in my early twenties. This season, I've been getting a lot of practice (~10 hrs / wk) on the rinks to get in better shape (I already rode the bike all summer - and winter). I've also been working on my skills.

All this is mostly to prepare for next summer and fall, when I plan on joining a garage league. However, I realize that playing ice hockey and shinny hockey aren't the same, and don't require the same skills. I'm going to give you a "player profile" of myself, and I'd like for you to suggest to me what I need to work on in order to become a better player within an organized, non-contact league.


Position: Left-handed defenseman, know how to play wing as well.

Strengths: Good speed, not great though. Good at winning board battles. Very good at anticipating and blocking passes. Almost unbeatable on 1-on-1 when I'm the defenseman. Good at getting into a position to receive a pass, except near the opposing net. Good at making accurate passes. Good at controlling the puck, even at high speed. Good at making a play behind the net (off or def zone).

Weaknesses: Weak shot, and I have trouble with quick execution - only my one-timer is respectable. I'm not good at deking 1-on-1, except if I can use my speed or the boards go around. Not willing to get in front of a slapshot. Also, when I have the puck, I take too much time to find an open player, and since I'm aware of this, I sometimes panic with the puck and either 1) play it along the boards hoping a teammate can catch the pass, or 2) try to deke the player who's putting pressure on me to buy more time, which can be a risk since as a defenseman I'm usually the last man back. I think the last weakness is my biggest problem.


OK, your call. Am I overlooking anything that I haven't mentioned, like some other skill I should have? I want to know what I need to improve or be aware of during a game situation. Also, what type of defenseman would I play best (offensive, defensive etc). And finally, what kind of forward would I make, and what would I need to improve if I wanted to play wing? Thanks in advance for your help.
nec get a 10 lbs weights tie a rope to it tight and positioned so it doesnt slip(about 4-5 feet slacl on the rope after tied) now to the end of the rope tie feet long stick or metal bar, hold it and wind up the wieght, where your using your wrist fore-back hand, theres a name for this excecise routine but i forgot, this is with out a doubt one of the best excercices you can do to help your ececution(espesialy during hard and awkard situations) the weights up and down for 10 mins every two days, do this and your wrist shot will shine and it'll be alote quiker to execute.
i play shiny with some freind who always played hockey one that played whl with kamloops and a bunch who played AA and AAA, i never played competitive hockey like that, im a very very bad skater who learned at 16 years of age but i always had a better more acurate shot then all these guys, we ussually play cross-bar shiny i i woop these fools bad, do this exercise and ever two weeks add five minutes to it so start off with 10 mins every two days, then (after 2 week) 15 mins every two day once you get to 20 increse your weight(but not alote, becuase it'll add bulk muscle you dont want that you want to get cut).
do this it'll work huge wonders for your shot, wrist snap and slap.
btw i also use to panic if i got the puck in the nuetral or defencive zone, to get better at this stay aware of your players movements and while you recive a pass stride wide towards the boards right when you get your pass when coverd, that'll make your opposing player change strides to suite yours then execute your pass.


Last edited by #44_delivers: 01-22-2004 at 01:37 AM.
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Old
01-22-2004, 01:33 AM
  #3
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work on your serve, you never know when it'll come in handy

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01-22-2004, 01:57 AM
  #4
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About the panicked play - it's tough to deal with, but I coach soccer and I come across the same thing there. My only advice to you is to know where your guys are before the puck comes close. Therefore, you have to be a consistently heads-up player and always know where everyone is, that way you can make your plays without looking. Your head should be on a pivot at all times so you know what's going on around you. Look at the best players in hockey - Ribs for example - he always knows where to play the puck because he always knows where everyone is.

There's one other thing that can help in that situation (that I know of, at least), though it works for overall puck control as well: take four pucks on the ice, use three as corners of a fairly small triangle, then work the fourth around and through that triangle. Each time you're on the ice, keep working at this for about 15 minutes at a time and your puck control will increase exponentially. The faster the better, of course, but start slow. Then, when someone pressures you, or you want to move past them, you'll have that much more confidence about your control. (BTW, I know this is an exercize that has been used by some of the better stickhandlers in the game.)

Not much help, I know. :-)

ACF

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01-22-2004, 08:06 AM
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Necrophile
Strengths: Good speed, not great though. Good at winning board battles. Very good at anticipating and blocking passes. Almost unbeatable on 1-on-1 when I'm the defenseman. Good at getting into a position to receive a pass, except near the opposing net. Good at making accurate passes. Good at controlling the puck, even at high speed. Good at making a play behind the net (off or def zone).

Weaknesses: Weak shot, and I have trouble with quick execution - only my one-timer is respectable. I'm not good at deking 1-on-1, except if I can use my speed or the boards go around. Not willing to get in front of a slapshot. Also, when I have the puck, I take too much time to find an open player, and since I'm aware of this, I sometimes panic with the puck and either 1) play it along the boards hoping a teammate can catch the pass, or 2) try to deke the player who's putting pressure on me to buy more time, which can be a risk since as a defenseman I'm usually the last man back. I think the last weakness is my biggest problem.
Hi, I played in some garage leagues and I also played on defense some times since a couple of years. I have learned some things from other players and from experience. You seems to be more a passer than a shuter, wich is not bad at all. Use your speed, if it is your best asset it'll be very useful to you and your team mates. In garage league, speedy players are rare!

Concerning the panic with the puck it is simple to handle this problem: When you have a rush and can not do a right pass:

In your zone: Dump the puck out of the zone, use the ramp, even if it`s gonna be an icing. Never pass in front or accross the net! The goaltender will never forget if he get scored because of that.

In neutral zone: If you have passed the red line, dump in attacking zone. You can use the ramp as well throwing it by center or any hole you see. If you didnt passed the red line, dump it (dump is the better way). When your goalie is very good (particulary with the puck handling and passing), you can pas him the puck but be sure he is ready to have it. This last option is very dangerous so I dont recommend it if you are in panic mode!

In attack zone: Two options: dump behind the net or shot on net. The best way to have your shots improve is to shot! But if there is no hole in front for you to have a shot, dump it behind the net.

For the "getting in front of a slap shot" issue, in garage league this is not the place to get injuries. The best way to block or redirect a slap shot is to get your stick right in front of the puck and stand clear of the angle of the shot. The best thing you can do is also be sure to not block the view of your goaltender. And of coarse wear a jackstrap!

Hope that some of that hints helped you...

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01-22-2004, 09:21 AM
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8b
Hi, I played in some garage leagues ....

In your zone: Dump the puck out of the zone, use the ramp, even if it`s gonna be an icing.

In neutral zone: If you have passed the red line, dump in attacking zone.

When your goalie is very good (particulary with the puck handling and passing), you can pas him the puck but be sure he is ready to have it. This last option is very dangerous so I dont recommend it if you are in panic mode!

In attack zone: Two options: dump behind the net or shot on net. ...

My critique of 8b's comments on dumping the puck are this…in a garage league, puck control is critical. Do not give the puck away unless you are really outgunned and could cause a goal against.

Remember, #1, the guys will not be in NHL game shape, dumping the puck will force guys to do the pathetic garage league forecheck, and just tire them out with little result. #2 you will probably play with two lines (10 players), not 4 lines like in competitive hockey. Tiring out the players for no reason is a great way to kill your players’ legs and lose in the third period.

Keep your game simple, passing to the goalie is a mistake waiting to happen, for that matter icing is better.

My advice regarding panic, it may seem simple… but… relax. Protect the puck by pivoting your body towards the opposing forchecker, he will give up pretty easily. This buys you the extra second to survey your teammates’ position and make a good pass. Slow the game down.

If you are in the offensive zone, and have no options, shot at the net instead of behind the net. Most garage goalies are not good puck handlers so it isn’t a turnover.

Please do not take offense 8b, just my opinion.

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01-22-2004, 09:38 AM
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Cole
My critique of 8b's comments on dumping the puck are this…in a garage league, puck control is critical. Do not give the puck away unless you are really outgunned and could cause a goal against.

Remember, #1, the guys will not be in NHL game shape, dumping the puck will force guys to do the pathetic garage league forecheck, and just tire them out with little result. #2 you will probably play with two lines (10 players), not 4 lines like in competitive hockey. Tiring out the players for no reason is a great way to kill your players’ legs and lose in the third period.

Keep your game simple, passing to the goalie is a mistake waiting to happen, for that matter icing is better.

My advice regarding panic, it may seem simple… but… relax. Protect the puck by pivoting your body towards the opposing forchecker, he will give up pretty easily. This buys you the extra second to survey your teammates’ position and make a good pass. Slow the game down.

If you are in the offensive zone, and have no options, shot at the net instead of behind the net. Most garage goalies are not good puck handlers so it isn’t a turnover.

Please do not take offense 8b, just my opinion.
Not offensed at all! You seems to be an experienced hockey player because what you say is good. But In many garage games I played I had players on my team who are not really good stick handler. The best they can do to avoid paniquing with the puck is to dump it. Let me tell you that everybody on the team will prefer that player dumps that he tries to stick handle it or worse try to pass it and gets intercepted. Experienced players (like you) won`t dump that much because they don't panic and experienced players will take the puck easily from a paniqued player.

Let me tell you that if you try to keep the puck or make passes anywhere when you panic and do the wrong play, your teammates wont like you... If you dump, nobody will care (espacialy your goalie if it happens in your zone). When panic is gone, do the fancy moves!

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01-22-2004, 09:39 AM
  #8
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Personnally, I started playing when I was 15 three years ago and I've never ever skated without the puck. I learned to play with the puck and I know my stickhandling is more then above average, I used to panik too so that stickhandling made wonders. It may turn you into a bit of a puckhog but I can beat pretty much anyone 1 on 1 cause of my agility, speed and stickhandling. It will also get you used to the tempo of the game and eventually you'll learn to pass the puck more and make the right decisions. Basically, I would always skate with the puck.

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01-22-2004, 09:43 AM
  #9
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Sorry it's long....just wanna help!

I think you are better off starting your first season on D. If you understand how to position a rushing forward towards the boards and cut the passing lane, you have 75% of the game down. When you get the puck in the defensive end, look towards the wingers. If they are near the boards, fire along the boards with enough speed that if they become checked while the pass is coming, they can just chip it up into the neutral zone.

This is the most basic way to get the puck out of your zone. It isn't fancy, but it works.

As for puck release, the one thing I can say is that during the warm up, that is the differnce between the guy who score and those who fan. It seems that every player has a booming shot. But during the game, they seem to sputter and make little dribble shots.

Here is a simple stationary drill. Take a few pucks and stand at the blue line about 10 feet from the boards. Pass the puck off the side boards to your self with enough force. When you get the rebound pass from the boards, control the puck, settle it down quickly and fire it at the net. First wristers, then slap shots (but do not wind up past the waist). Release as fast as possible. Repetition.

For a drill on the move, skate in towards the net (a few feet to the left/right). Fire a low shot at the boards after one stride after the blue line. Catch the rebound pass and release as fast as possible at the net. Now try the other side of the net for you throw in pass.

These are drills that you can do at the out door rink, by yourself.

The 10lbs weight wrist exercise above is a great idea too.

And lastly.....regarding panic.... do all your skating with a puck. Always. Get used to the feeling of it on your blade. Always stickhandle ..left/right/left/right over and over, and vary the speed of the r/l motion, drop it to your skates and kick it back toi the stick. Even in skating drills, stop and go's, always with a puck. This is how you get used to the presence of the puck in your control.

As for dekes, this will come with confidence with the puck. Not everyone has the moves. Just protect the puck, this is the most important thing. Then think lateral movement. But it is not the end all....look at Reechi, the guy has never deked anyone or gone through the middle. He just drives to the outside.

We can't all be like Kovalev or Jagr.

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01-22-2004, 09:47 AM
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Habsaku
Personnally, I started playing when I was 15 three years ago and I've never ever skated without the puck. I learned to play with the puck and I know my stickhandling is more then above average, I used to panik too so that stickhandling made wonders. .

Great advice, always skate with a puck. Familiarity breeds confidence.

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01-22-2004, 09:47 AM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Cole
.

And lastly.....regarding panic.... do all your skating with a puck. Always. Get used to the feeling of it on your blade. Always stickhandle ..left/right/left/right over and over, and vary the speed of the r/l motion, drop it to your skates and kick it back toi the stick. Even in skating drills, stop and go's, always with a puck. This is how you get used to the presence of the puck in your control.


Agreed! Exactly what I said !

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01-22-2004, 09:50 AM
  #12
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Man! I love hockey!!

I play my second game this week tonight! I am so psyched

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01-22-2004, 11:33 AM
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Playing defense is all about positionning and anticipation. So what if you have a weak shot, if you put it on net who knows what will happen!

I "retired" from junior hockey 5 years ago. Then, I used to play pick up hockey here and there but nothing serious. But it's been 3 years since I've put on my skates last! Blasphmy! Well I'm finishing school now so when I get a job i can buy a car then i can join a "garaqge league" and have fun again

Hockey rules
All my good memories come from hockey (well almost all)

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01-23-2004, 12:41 AM
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Cole
Protect the puck by pivoting your body towards the opposing forchecker, he will give up pretty easily. This buys you the extra second to survey your teammates’ position and make a good pass. Slow the game down.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8b
In many garage games I played I had players on my team who are not really good stick handler. The best they can do to avoid paniquing with the puck is to dump it. Let me tell you that everybody on the team will prefer that player dumps that he tries to stick handle it or worse try to pass it and gets intercepted. Experienced players (like you) won`t dump that much because they don't panic and experienced players will take the puck easily from a paniqued player.

Let me tell you that if you try to keep the puck or make passes anywhere when you panic and do the wrong play, your teammates wont like you... If you dump, nobody will care (espacialy your goalie if it happens in your zone). When panic is gone, do the fancy moves!
Basically, when I'm in a situation of being in the defensive zone with the puck, I should look to the forwards (or fellow defenseman) to make a pass. If I can't find a decent passing lane and am being pressured, then you suggest three options:

1- dump/pass it along the boards
2- pivot to protect the puck from the forechecker
3- get around the forechecker

Considering I am good at getting around (not through) a player, have good speed, and can control the puck well, which option would suit me best? I would think the first option is safest in avoiding imminent threat but can often result in a turnover, while the 2nd option somewhat safely buys me time but still leaves me back to square one, and the 3rd option is the most effective in starting a defence-to-offence transition, although more risky. Should I try the third option if I'm confident in my puck control? Or should I rather spare my teammates the stress and go with option 1 or 2?

Thanks to all for the advice.

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01-23-2004, 12:53 AM
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Necrophile
Basically, when I'm in a situation of being in the defensive zone with the puck, I should look to the forwards (or fellow defenseman) to make a pass. If I can't find a decent passing lane and am being pressured, then you suggest three options:

1- dump/pass it along the boards
2- pivot to protect the puck from the forechecker
3- get around the forechecker

Considering I am good at getting around (not through) a player, have good speed, and can control the puck well, which option would suit me best? I would think the first option is safest in avoiding imminent threat but can often result in a turnover, while the 2nd option somewhat safely buys me time but still leaves me back to square one, and the 3rd option is the most effective in starting a defence-to-offence transition, although more risky. Should I try the third option if I'm confident in my puck control? Or should I rather spare my teammates the stress and go with option 1 or 2?

Thanks to all for the advice.
when you control the puck in your defencive zone dont be too hastey at all to do anything, when you have it behind the nuetral zone watch for whos pinching on your team and whos pinching on the offencive team, if your recieving a pass while being covered in your zone stay head-up and immideitly head away from the open slot, right towards the boards and protect the puck and wait for your oppertunities from either your players or your coverer, remember your worst option is to give a turnover, so dont be too hastey at all stay cool.
plus i think you said your good on the boards so it'll be using your strengths effectively.
good luck bro

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01-23-2004, 10:34 AM
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Necrophile

1- dump/pass it along the boards
2- pivot to protect the puck from the forechecker
3- get around the forechecker

Considering I am good at getting around (not through) a player, have good speed, and can control the puck well, which option would suit me best? I would think the first option is safest in avoiding imminent threat but can often result in a turnover, while the 2nd option somewhat safely buys me time but still leaves me back to square one, and the 3rd option is the most effective in starting a defence-to-offence transition, although more risky. Should I try the third option if I'm confident in my puck control? Or should I rather spare my teammates the stress and go with option 1 or 2?

Thanks to all for the advice.
It all depends of the situation. If you are a good skater and have a good stick hangling, you shouldn't panic! It is sure in your zone if you got no other options it is best to dump the puck than try a fancy move but in other zone or situation you could try getting around the player rushing you.

Anyway in garage league, nothing is really important there, have fun and try things!

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