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The physics of hockey

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Old
01-25-2004, 11:40 AM
  #1
lazek
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The physics of hockey

Interesting read...

"When two NHL hockey players collide, their pads and body tissues can absorb enough energy to power a 100-watt light bulb for a minute and a half"

http://www.adn.com/life/story/4668251p-4622431c.html


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01-25-2004, 12:04 PM
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ChemiseBleuHonnete
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and did you know that low slap shots don't have more velocity than higher one? They just reach the net in a shorter time (trigonometry) and the radars are always calibrated to measure the time that the puck takes to reach the net, not the puck velocity. Since the lower shot has less distance to do, it appears to be faster on a radar but a high shot is even harder sometimes.

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01-25-2004, 12:06 PM
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RE-HABS
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You guys are scaring me!

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Old
01-25-2004, 12:27 PM
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Damn, I've benn studying Physic for two hours. I got on the board to clear my head and the only new topic is about physic of hockey...

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Old
01-26-2004, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boutmania
Damn, I've benn studying Physic for two hours. I got on the board to clear my head and the only new topic is about physic of hockey...
haha just too bad

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Old
01-26-2004, 01:54 PM
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Joe Malone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lazek
Interesting read...

"When two NHL hockey players collide, their pads and body tissues can absorb enough energy to power a 100-watt light bulb for a minute and a half"

http://www.adn.com/life/story/4668251p-4622431c.html

It has been said that Hab fans are among the most knowledgeable in the game, but this takes it to a new level.

Just curious though, how long would a light bulb be powered from a Yannick Perreault bodycheck?

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01-26-2004, 02:15 PM
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Prrebel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Malone
Just curious though, how long would a light bulb be powered from a Yannick Perreault bodycheck?
I'm afraid thats one problem we may never know the answer to.

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01-26-2004, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Malone
It has been said that Hab fans are among the most knowledgeable in the game, but this takes it to a new level.

Just curious though, how long would a light bulb be powered from a Yannick Perreault bodycheck?
Someone's gonna be reading in the dark!

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Old
01-26-2004, 03:56 PM
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Darz
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Interesting read. Thank's for the hook up, lazek.

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Old
01-26-2004, 04:39 PM
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watercoolant
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Interesting read... did anyone pay attention to the reason why ice is slippery? I heard that the 'thin layer' the article was describing consists of molecules that only moves up and down, but not sideways. And somehow it reduces the friction on the surface. So the next question is: Does anyone have any experiences in curling, that if someone brushes in front of the stone (while the stone is moving), will the stone slow down at a faster rate or slower rate? Because from this analogy, the stone should slow down at a faster rate from all the brushing (turning ice into water and thus increase the friction on the surface).

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Old
01-26-2004, 04:45 PM
  #11
All-Star
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Quote:
Originally Posted by watercoolant
Interesting read... did anyone pay attention to the reason why ice is slippery? I heard that the 'thin layer' the article was describing consists of molecules that only moves up and down, but not sideways. And somehow it reduces the friction on the surface. So the next question is: Does anyone have any experiences in curling, that if someone brushes in front of the stone (while the stone is moving), will the stone slow down at a faster rate or slower rate? Because from this analogy, the stone should slow down at a faster rate from all the brushing (turning ice into water and thus increase the friction on the surface).
Curling ice isn't smooth, so heating it up really does make it faster because it melts the pellets...

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