HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > Fantasy Hockey Talk > All Time Draft
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Notices

All Time Draft Fantasy league where players of the past and present meet.

Atd#8-MLII ***The All-Time AAA Draft *** (picks, rosters, everything in this thread)

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
02-16-2008, 07:14 PM
  #101
vancityluongo
Twin Benning
 
vancityluongo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Edmonton
Country: Canada
Posts: 13,463
vCash: 1070
BTW, I think I have a hunch as to who you're gonna take VanI. I'll try and get up early tommorow to beat you.

vancityluongo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-16-2008, 07:18 PM
  #102
VanIslander
Don't waste my time
 
VanIslander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 24,561
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by vancityluongo View Post
BTW, I think I have a hunch as to who you're gonna take VanI. I'll try and get up early tommorow to beat you.
9:00 a.m. sunday morning eastern time. Be there or be square.

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-16-2008, 08:30 PM
  #103
pitseleh
Registered User
 
pitseleh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 18,237
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by cottonking View Post
LW Don Lever
Evil Speaker took him in the MLD.

pitseleh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-16-2008, 08:44 PM
  #104
ck26
Alcoholab User
 
ck26's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Coyotes Bandwagon
Country: United States
Posts: 10,643
vCash: 141
D Lyle Odelein

ck26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-16-2008, 09:12 PM
  #105
VanIslander
Don't waste my time
 
VanIslander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 24,561
vCash: 500
3rd, 4th, 5th round reflections:

players stolen from the Grrrowl long list: Courtnall, McGimsie, Odelein
players who should've been on the list: Lewicki, Gilbert, Reibel, Poile
players surprisingly drafted: Young, Yawney, Thornson
players that went as expected: Dafoe, Rouse, Houle
interesting picks: Brown, Simmons, McVeigh, Daley

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 12:42 AM
  #106
God Bless Canada
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Bentley reunion
Country: Canada
Posts: 11,793
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by cottonking View Post
D Lyle Odelein
Nice recovery pick. Definitely good enough to be picked as a depth (No. 6 or 7), physical defensive defenceman in the MLD.

God Bless Canada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 12:52 AM
  #107
Wrigley
The Blues
 
Wrigley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9,049
vCash: 3495
Quote:
Originally Posted by vancityluongo View Post
Nice find. Although in a weak league, having well above a PPG average over the course of your career is pretty impressive.
Agreed. I was going to take a minor leaguer in the first round and still might take him in the next AAA draft if it's okay with my Co-GM.

Wrigley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 12:54 AM
  #108
Wrigley
The Blues
 
Wrigley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9,049
vCash: 3495
Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
New to me too. I really enjoy learning about the history of hockey in researching picks because it's full of interesting stories. The hockey world nowadays is downright boring in comparison.
When I get my signature I've got the greatest quote from a player. You guys are going to love it.

Wrigley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 12:56 AM
  #109
Wrigley
The Blues
 
Wrigley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9,049
vCash: 3495
Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
Wait until tomorrow. The left wing I'm gonna draft then will make your jaw drop and say "I thought he was already drafted!" or "How could I forgotten him!" or "You did it again. Robber!" Mark it.
Bologna marked. I know who it is. Seriously.


Last edited by Wrigley: 02-17-2008 at 01:28 AM.
Wrigley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 12:57 AM
  #110
God Bless Canada
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Bentley reunion
Country: Canada
Posts: 11,793
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
Yeah, and with television creating more of a youthful fan base than blue-collar workers going to games, players are more 'role models' than ever. Add to that the fact that they are millionaires nowadays so they have a lot more to loose.

The major professional sports are becoming fossilized. It's the new and fringe sports with devout fan bases but little profit where the true heart of sport lies.
It's the IMG-controlled sports universe. You touched on it - the millions of dollars at stake. Not just in salaries. But in terms of endorsements. How many Eddie Shack type players are out there now? I've talked to Shack on several times. Hell of a guy. Great character. Great talker. But some of the things he says wouldn't go over too well with the PC crowd, or with an agent. There's so much money at stake, and guys know that if they pop off, if they try to be colourful, usually they get criticized, and they even lose their big deals.

I remember, as a kid, I was not a Charles Barkley fan. I thought he was a jerk. Now that I'm in the media, Sir Charles is one of my all-time favourite athletes. The guy is a character, he's candid, he's colourful, and bottom line: he's usually right. Brendan Shanahan's colourful, and wildly entertaining. The sign that hung above his locker room stall 20 years ago still rings true today: "Better quotes." And, again, he's usually right. Unfortunately, guys like Sir Charles, Shanny, Roenick, Shaquille O'Neal, Dennis Hull, John McEnroe and the late Payne Stewart - guys with flair, energy, personality, and an articulate, well-thought-out, and sometimes controversial but accurate opinion - are very hard to find. And in my business, they're very well-liked.

God Bless Canada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 08:00 AM
  #111
Wrigley
The Blues
 
Wrigley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9,049
vCash: 3495
The Falcons are proud to select LW Norman "Dutch" Gainor

Norman "Dutch" Gainor came up through the ASHL ranks before playing with the Duluth Hornets of the CHL in 1925-26. That catapulted him to Calgary for one year before he was sent to the Boston Bruins by Minneapolis, who owned his AHA rights.

Gainor appeared in 42 games with the Bruins in his first NHL season in 1927-28 and contributed eight goals and 12 points. He played four years in Beantown and his most productive NHL season occurred in 1929-30 when he tallied 18 goals and 49 points in 42 games. It was often said Gainor was plagued with the worst set of varicose veins known to mankind. But cosmetic appearance never seemed to bother Gainor, and it definitely did not effect his play as he was considered one of the top left wingers in the NHL in the mid to late 1920s.

In the summer of 1931 Gainor was stunned to learn he had been traded to the New York Rangers. He played just one year in the Big Apple and was traded to Ottawa after a sub-par offensive season. His last NHL stop was in 1934-35 when he dressed for 35 games with the Montreal Maroons.

In 246 NHL games Gainor scored 51 goals and 107 points. He died in 1960 at the age of 56.

Wrigley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 08:06 AM
  #112
VanIslander
Don't waste my time
 
VanIslander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 24,561
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny O View Post
The Falcons are proud to select LW Norman "Dutch" Gainor

Gainor appeared in 42 games with the Bruins in his first NHL season in 1927-28 and contributed eight goals and 12 points. He played four years in Beantown and his most productive NHL season occurred in 1929-30 when he tallied 18 goals and 49 points in 42 games.

In 246 NHL games Gainor scored 51 goals and 107 points. He died in 1960 at the age of 56.
Good morning.

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 08:09 AM
  #113
VanIslander
Don't waste my time
 
VanIslander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 24,561
vCash: 500
This guy is one of the great support players and a significant part in the history of hockey: two-way talented, tough, hardworking, feisty, ferocious, competitive, clutch, leader, team-first, successful on a top line or checking line, deserving of the main draft as a quality depth pick in an all-time context, left wing...



Bob "Hound Dog" Kelly



Quote:
one of the toughest and the most tenacious... True to his nickname, Kelly bounded across the ice like an unleashed bloodhound, throwing his body around with abandon. A consummate team player, Kelly did whatever it took to win. He'd be the first in line to fight to defend a teammate.
He'd sacrifice offense for defense. He'd chip in timely goals.

Off the ice, Kelly's good-natured sense of humor and outgoing personality made him a favorite of teammates, fans, and reporters alike.
A consummate team player, Kelly was a sparkplug in the Flyers Stanley Cup engine.
http://flyers.nhl.com/team/app?servi...Page&bcid=2920

362 points in 837 NHL games with 1454 PIM (23 points, 172 PIM in 101 playoff games)
4-time Stanley Cup finalist, 2-time champion

Quote:
The ‘Houndog’ brought plenty of bite to his game as one of the Broad Street Bullies, but Bob James Kelly could also hurt the opposition in plenty of other ways, too....

“The kid has lots of polish and is definitely hard to ignore,” praised the ex-Flyers coach, of the rugged rookie, who appeared in 76 games in 1970-71. “He can also add some offensive punch to our lineup.”

In his first year at the pro level, Kelly, when he wasn’t bowling over opponents or dropping the gloves, provided 14 goals and 18 assists, making him a valuable asset at both ends of the ice.

He duplicated that goal total in his sophomore campaign, reaching the double-digit mark in tallies in three of his first four NHL seasons. And as Kelly became more comfortable in his contributions, he began to elevate the physical side to his game, part of an intimidating group that would eventually earn the well-deserved ‘Broad Street Bullies’ moniker.

Aside from his hard-hitting ways, Kelly was a plus player in the truest sense, sporting a positive plus/minus rating in his first 10 NHL seasons, including a stellar plus-21 in 1974-75.

Kelly was also a major player in Philadelphia’s back-to-back Stanley Cup wins in 1974 and 1975, crashing and bashing rivals with a steady diet of bone-crushing body checks. In 1975, he netted three goals and added three assists in 16 playoff games.

On a team that featured mobility and muscle,... Kelly fit in perfectly.

In his final year in orange and black, 1979-80, Kelly had 15 goals and 20 assists, accompanied by 122 penalty minutes and a plus-19 rating, typical statistics for a player that relied on grit and guts to get the job done on a nightly basis.

In the summer of 1980, Kelly was traded to the Washington Capitals.. ‘Hound dog’ responded to the trade in fine fashion, scoring a career-best 26 goals along with 36 helpers. Although the Caps didn’t make the post-season, there was no ignoring the forward’s fine play during the regular schedule.

Overall, Kelly played in 837 NHL contests, recording 154 goals and 362 points. He was also a veteran of 101 playoff games, netting nine goals and 23 points overall.

It was truly a remarkable career for a player who went full-out every shift he took, never giving an inch to anyone regardless of their size or reputation.
http://www.nhlalumni.net/?pid=news_a...01_1059696000_

Quote:
...a solid offensive player at the junior level (21 goals and 44 points in 54 games as an Oshawa Generals rookie... it was already clear that his physical play, more than his goal scoring, would be Kelly's calling card.

Kelly was not only a fearsome forechecker, he also knew what to do when he dropped the gloves. He quickly gained the reputation as one of the toughest...
In Kelly's second OHA season, he averaged close to a point-per game (21 goals and 53 points in 54 games) to go along with his 117 penalty minutes.

"My first three NHL games were an unbelievable test for me and the whole team. Right away, I'm out there playing against teams like Montreal and Boston," says Kelly today. "I nearly froze up on my first shift. I'm out on the ice and there's guys like Henri Richard and [Jean] Beliveau."

Kelly soon overcame his nerves. During much of his rookie and second season, he played left wing on Clarke's line. Both years, Kelly tallied 14 goals. In his second season, he added 157 penalty minutes to the mix.
Quote:
"My role changed under Freddie (Shero)," says Kelly today. "We had guys like Billy Barber and Ross Lonsberry who could play on the scoring lines, so Freddie used me to give the guys energy."

Shero did not view taking Kelly off of Clarke's line as a demotion, even if it meant less ice time for the player. Rather, he said that forechecking and fighting were areas where Kelly could stand out.

"If Bob Kelly scores twenty goals, I'm not using him properly," said the Fog (coach Fred Shero) in 1973. "He's got something that's hard to come by. No coach in the world can make a guy do what Kelly does. It's not in his contract. It comes from within him."

Every player from new team captain Bobby Clarke on down had the utmost respect for Kelly's value to the club.

"Anyone who says Kelly doesn't belong in the NHL has no idea what goes into winning hockey games," said Clarke in the mid-1970s. "Show me a team that wouldn't take Kelly in a heartbeat and I'll show you a team that doesn't want to be a winner."

While Dave "The Hammer" Schultz was the Flyers' best known and most frequent pugilist, Kelly was arguably the toughest. "He always gets in three or four punches before the other guy realizes he's in a fight," marveled Clarke. "He throws punches faster than anyone in the league."

Even the Hammer himself concurred. "In terms of pure toughness, Kelly was first on the Flyers and I was second," Schultz told prolific hockey writer Stan Fischler. "With all due respect, Kelly became the heavyweight champion of the Flyers."

Statistically, Kelly had the worst season of his career in 1973-74. In 65 games, he scored just four goals and 14 points in fairly limited ice time and went pointless in the playoffs. His penalty totals dropped from 238 minutes to 130. But, as always, stats revealed little about his value to the team. For example, one night during the 1973-74 season, the Rangers jumped out to a 3-0 lead at the Spectrum. Shero's Flyers needed every bit of energy Kelly could provide them. The Hound toppled Rangers left and right, whipped Ron Harris in a fight, and assisted on two goals, helping the team rally all the way back to earn a tie.

Kelly's battles with the Rangers continued in the playoffs. After the Flyers dispatched the Atlanta Flames in the first round, they embarked on a seven game war with the Blueshirts. Kelly was a thorn in the Rangers' side throughout the first two games. Shero sent Kelly to "hound" Harris and drive New York to distraction with his forechecking. Rangers coach Emile Francis countered by switching Harris to another line and replacing him with rookie Jerry Butler. Kelly promptly pounded Butler. The Flyers took the first two games of the series at home.

Quote:
scored the 1975 Stanley Cup winning goal

Quote:
One of Shero's offbeat practice drills was to have his players take the puck behind the net, swing out quickly in front and try to score. The winner received a $5 prize. Little did anyone know that the drill would pay huge dividends. With the Flyers leading the Buffalo Sabres 3 games to 2 in the Stanley Cup Finals, they entered the third period of Game 6 in a scoreless deadlock. In the opening minute of the third period, Shero sicked the Hound on the Sabres. Kelly pounced on huge Sabres defenseman Jerry Korab behind the Buffalo net, jarring the puck free. He then swooped out in front of the net and beat Sabres' goalie Roger Crozier for his 3rd goal of the playoffs and the biggest goal of his career. Kelly was mobbed by his teammates. As he got back to the bench, he looked at Shero and said, "Freddie, that's five bucks you owe me." Kelly's tally was all Philly would need. A Bill Clement insurance marker gave the Flyers a 2-0 win behind Bernie Parent's shutout goaltending. The Flyers were once again the Stanley Cup champions. Today, Kelly says that he considers the second Cup "a little bit sweeter" than the first, because he was such a key contributor.


Quote:
January 11th, 1976, Kelly manhandles the Red Army in the Flyers 4-1 win

Quote:
Kelly enjoyed two his best seasons in 1976-77 and 1977-78. The first year, he received increased ice time and, for the first time, cracked the 20-goal barrier to go along with his 125 penalty minutes. The next, he scored 19 and was a playoff warrior, with three goals, eight points and uncounted big hits in 12 games. In particular, Kelly gave the Toronto Maple Leafs fits.

...the Flyers new head coach... Quinn's first moves was to experiment with a new line combination. He put Kelly on the left wing of a line with tough center Mel Bridgman... providing both energy and supporting offense... With Kelly, as usual, working tirelessly in the corners and creating extra room for teammates, Bridgman went on to score 24 goals and 59 points in addition to his 184 penalty minutes "Bob Kelly is one guy I never have to worry about," said Pat Quinn shortly before the 1979-80 season. "He comes to play every night and he's a leader both on and off the ice."

The 1979-80 season would be Kelly's last as a Flyer. He made it count. Now playing a veteran leadership role, Kelly dressed in 75 regular season games and 19 playoff contests. Although assigned primarily to checking duties, Kelly scored 15 goals. He also still knew how to lift the club's spirits with a well-timed fight or body check (122 penalty minutes). Kelly was right in the thick of the action as the Flyers set a North American professional sports record by going undefeated in 35 consecutive games. They ultimately lost in a heartbreaking six game Stanley Cup Final against the New York Islanders, who went on to win four consecutive Cups.

The Flyers traded Kelly to the lowly Washington Capitals... Knowing only how to play full speed ahead, the Hound put up his highest penalty totals since 1972-73 (157 penalty minutes). He also had to take on an increased offensive burden and responded with his best statistical season in the NHL – 26 goals and 62 points.

Kelly retired with 837 regular season games and 101 playoff tilts to his credit. He notched 154 regular season goals and 1,454 penalty minutes without having played a single game in the minor leagues.
http://flyers.nhl.com/team/app?servi...Page&bcid=2920

Quote:
scored an important momentum-preserving insurance goal as a game star in the Flyers' NHL record-setting 29th consecutive unbeaten game (in what would become their 35-game streak), a 5-2 win over Boston in 1980


Quote:
"The Hound" was an instant hit with the Flyers fans and his teammates. Kelly soon became one of the team's resident pranksters – and was himself often the victim of practical jokes.

It was, in fact, a rookie Kelly who was the subject of one of the most elaborate practical jokes in Flyers' annals: the snipe hunt. The tale is still often retold by Kelly's old teammates and has been recounted in numerous hockey books.

For over a month, the veterans on the team told Kelly stories about all the fun they'd have snipe hunting. Then they claimed that rookies weren't allowed to participate.

"What's a snipe?" asked Kelly.

"They're sort of like pigeons," answered Flyers' veteran defenseman Ed Van Impe.

"Can you eat them?"

"Only the breasts. My wife cooks them in a wine sauce and are they ever delicious!" said Van Impe.

Kelly begged to come along. Van Impe said he'd consider making an exception to the no-rookies "rule."

Over the next few days, Kelly's teammates instructed him in the art of snipe hunting. Goalie Doug Favell had him practice "snipe calls" while enforcer Earl Heiskala told him that the way to hunt snipes is to beat the bushes with long poles and when the snipes fly, to shine a flashlight on them. The birds would get panicked and confused, giving the hunters a chance to catch them in fishing nets.

Of course, it was all a joke to initiate Kelly into the NHL fraternity. Van Impe arranged with friends in the Delaware County police department to come arrest Kelly for "hunting snipe without a license in a snipe preserve." They even arranged for a stern justice of the peace to scare Kelly into thinking he was going to jail. Finally, his teammates materialized in the courtroom and let him off the hook.

After the initial shock subsided, Kelly responded with his usual good humor.
And, for the fun of it, see retired Bob Kelly vs. Bernie Parent in tockey:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymlwszqTScY

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 08:50 AM
  #114
pappyline
Registered User
 
pappyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Mass/formerly Ont
Country: United States
Posts: 4,307
vCash: 500
Chicago selects LW- Errol Thompson

Quote:
A speedy left-winger with a blazing shot, Errol Thompson played nearly 600 NHL games in the 1970s and '80s. He was a good-natured competitor whose skill allowed him to hit the 20-goal mark six times in his career. -legends of hockey

pappyline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 11:09 AM
  #115
chaosrevolver
Snubbed Again
 
chaosrevolver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 15,728
vCash: 500
The Niagara Falls Americanadians are extremely proud to select....Defenseman - Jocelyn Guevremont.

As a junior rearguard with the Montreal Junior Canadiens from 1968 to 1971, Jocelyn Guevremont established some very impressive credentials, especially for his offensive work from the point.

The newly-formed Vancouver Canucks made the young rearguard their first-ever amateur selection in the 1971 Amateur Draft. And although he lacked defensive skills during the early going, he applied himself steadfastly to balance his game. As such, he finished his rookie campaign with a league-record 51 points, the most, up to that time, scored by a rookie.

As an offensive specialist, Guevremont continued his industrious efforts to shore up his defensive game. The results came to fruition after his trade to the Buffalo Sabres in 1974. There he succeeded in maintaining his offensive output while landing on the positive side of the plus/minus scale year in and year out.

He lasted with the Sabres until 1979. At that time, he was dispatched to the New York Rangers. In the Big Apple, however, Guevremont saw only limited action, spending much of his time in the press box watching new recruits make rookie mistakes. He was finally sent down to the New Haven Nighthawks of the AHL. But before he left, he warned the Rangers' management that unless he got some ice-time on his next invite the NHL, they could consider him to have a chronic shoulder ailment.

As a result, word traveled across the league that the veteran defender was damaged goods. The fallout came in the form of no offers from other NHL clubs, such as the St. Louis Blues, who would have otherwise picked him up. Tired of waiting by the phone, Guevremont retired at the close of the 1979-80 campaign.


NHL Career:
GM: 571
G: 84
A: 223
P: 307
PIM: 319
+/-: +22 (Between '74 and '79 he was +141)

Playoffs:
GM: 40
G: 4
A: 17
P: 21
PIM: 18
- 4 Playoff Appearences
- 1 Cup Final Appearance

Awards:
OHA-Jr. Second All-Star Team (1970)
OHA-Jr. First All-Star Team (1971)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1974)

Other Recognitions:
Represented Canada in the 1972 Summit Series.


Last edited by chaosrevolver: 02-17-2008 at 11:16 AM.
chaosrevolver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 11:30 AM
  #116
MXD
Registered User
 
MXD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hôlle
Posts: 32,403
vCash: 500
If I might add, for Charles McVeigh (as he was one of the guys I pimped), he was considered an extremely feisty (albeit smallish) player, with good-to-great defensive awareness, enough to "earn" AT LEAST one retroactive Selke award. I said AT LEAST one, because I lost the data, and I cannot remember if he earned this more than once. McVeigh played every forward position when he was with the Kenora Thirstles, but was more used as an LW in the NHL.

MXD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 11:38 AM
  #117
Transplanted Caper
Registered User
 
Transplanted Caper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Internet Underbelly
Country: Canada
Posts: 27,704
vCash: 500
The Bulldogs select D. Grant Ledyard

Quote:
Defenceman Grant Ledyard began his 18th NHL season, as a member of the Tampa Bay Lightning, in 2001-02. He was approaching 1,000 career games in a career that has seen him add experience and puck handling savvy to eight different teams.

Ledyard played junior with the Fort Garry Blues and Saskatoon Blades and then signed as a free agent with the New York Rangers in 1982. He began his pro career in the CHL as a fine playmaking defenceman on the Tulsa Oilers. In 1984, he was presented the Bob Gassoff Award as the most improved defenceman in the league.

Ledyard split the 1984-85 season between the AHL and the Rangers. Following the Blueshirts' elimination from the first round of the playoffs, the young rearguard joined Team Canada at the 1985 World Championships. Part-way through the 1985-86 season, Ledyard was traded to the L.A. Kings. In 1986-87, he scored a career-high 14 goals and joined the Washington Capitals the next year. Late in the 1988-89 season, Ledyard was traded to the Buffalo Sabres where he found a home as a defensive leader on the club for over four years.

In August 1993, Ledyard sought stability by signing a long-term deal as a free agent with the Dallas Stars. In 1993-94, he scored 46 points and helped to quarterback the power play. He remained with the Stars for three more years as they became a league power.


Last edited by Transplanted Caper: 02-17-2008 at 11:47 AM.
Transplanted Caper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 11:42 AM
  #118
chaosrevolver
Snubbed Again
 
chaosrevolver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 15,728
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transplanted Caper View Post
The Bulldogs select D. Grant Ledyard
It was between him and Guevremont for me.

chaosrevolver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 11:46 AM
  #119
pitseleh
Registered User
 
pitseleh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 18,237
vCash: 500
The Blades select D Joe Cooper.

Quote:
In 1934-35, 20-year-old Joe Cooper began his pro hockey career in New York playing in the EHL. In 21 games he had five goals and 19 points while racking up 70 minutes in penalties. At 6'1" and 200 pounds, Cooper was one of the biggest and strongest players of his day, and he used his physical superiority whenever possible.

In 1935-36, he joined the Philadelphia Ramblers of the CAHL where he was known as one of the toughest opponents to play against. Many opposing forwards dreaded having to rush the net, or, even worse, face Cooper along the back boards. He had a one-game tryout with the NHL's New York Rangers and impressed team officials.
He went on to play 420 games in the NHL as a hard-nosed defensive defenseman.

pitseleh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 12:34 PM
  #120
vancityluongo
Twin Benning
 
vancityluongo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Edmonton
Country: Canada
Posts: 13,463
vCash: 1070
Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
This guy is one of the great support players and a significant part in the history of hockey: two-way talented, tough, hardworking, feisty, ferocious, competitive, clutch, leader, team-first, successful on a top line or checking line, deserving of the main draft as a quality depth pick in an all-time context, left wing...


362 points in 837 NHL games with 1454 PIM (23 points, 172 PIM in 101 playoff games)
4-time Stanley Cup finalist, 2-time champion


http://www.nhlalumni.net/?pid=news_a...01_1059696000_













http://flyers.nhl.com/team/app?servi...Page&bcid=2920







And, for the fun of it, see retired Bob Kelly vs. Bernie Parent in tockey:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymlwszqTScY
Ha! I got up at 9:30AM EST and didn't even bother signing in; I came to check who you picked....guess my hunch was wrong!

My pick coming shortly.

vancityluongo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 12:41 PM
  #121
seventieslord
Student Of The Game
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 30,158
vCash: 500
The Regina Potholes select RW Don Metz.

http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/...p?player=13718

Quote:
The aggressive-checking redhead bounced between Toronto and the AHL Pittsburgh Hornets in 1939-40, but he was recognized as a dependable forward and found himself playing fulltime in blue and white during the 1940-41 and 1941-42 seasons. In fact, Metz started out as a spare part in the 1941-42 playoffs, but Leaf coach Hap Day played a hunch, inserting him and rookie Gaye Stewart into the lineup in place of veterans Hank Goldup and Gord Drillon at a desperate time in the series.

Day's strategy worked, and the Leafs turned the tide, erasing a three-games-to-none deficit in the finals against the Red Wings and winning four straight games to shock the world and win the most improbable of Stanley Cup wins. Don Metz played a substantial role, scoring four goals and three assists in the four games he was employed in the final.
That Stanley Cup was one of two Metz would enjoy during the nine partial seasons he played in Maple Leaf Gardens.

seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 12:42 PM
  #122
vancityluongo
Twin Benning
 
vancityluongo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Edmonton
Country: Canada
Posts: 13,463
vCash: 1070
Although a very different player from Bob Kelly, who was hard working and had no limits to his determination, Alfredshems IK select a very talented Czech that we believe should also have gone in one of the two previous drafts, LW Petr Klima.


http://redwingslegends.blogspot.com/2007/03/petr-klima.html


Quote:
Edmonton Sun reporter Terry Jones perhaps said it best about Petr Klima when he said "Petr Klima is 32 years old, played 12 years in the NHL and has never broken a sweat."

Klima was a tremendously talented left winger who played in 773 NHL games, scoring 312 goals and 260 assists for the Detroit Red Wings, Edmonton Oilers, Tampa Bay Lightning, Los Angeles Kings and Pittsburgh Penguins. Despite his breathtaking skating ability, marvelous hands and cannon-like shot, Klima was a lazy player who was too satisfied with decent offensive numbers when he could have posted superstar statistics.

Klima defected from his native Czechoslovakia in 1985 at the age of 21. In honor of gaining his freedom from the Iron Curtain in that year, Klima wore jersey number 85 throughout his NHL career. However Klima, who grew up in relative poverty in communist Czechoslovakia, quickly became enthralled by life in North America. With big money contracts and fast cars, Klima had achieved greater freedom than he may had thought was possible when he was a kid. Perhaps his new found freedom distracted him from focusing completely on hockey. Klima has always been criticized for being too laid back and even lazy to achieve the status that his god given talents should have gotten him.

Klima, who wore a very unusual helmet which Don Cherry insisted was designed to protect his fancy hair-do, played his first 4 seasons in the Motor City with Detroit. He was a consistent 30 goal man in his tenure with the Wings, with his best year being 1987-88 when he scored 37 times. He would also explode in the playoffs to lead the Wings with 10 goals in just 12 games.

Klima would score a career high 40 goals in 1990-91 as a member of the Edmonton Oilers. Late in 1989 Klima was packaged in a significant deal that saw Klima, Joe Murphy, Adam Graves and Jeff Sharples traded to the Oilers in exchange for Detroit native Jimmy Carson and long time Oiler Kevin McClelland.

With the exception of an injury shortened 1991-92 season, Klima continued to be a consistent 30 goal threat. However come playoff time Klima was used sparingly. The Oilers felt that his fragile body wasn't conducive to NHL playoff conditions and he was, as always, a defensive liability. However Klima's biggest moment came in the 1990 Stanley Cup Finals, specifically game 1. The Oilers were facing ex-Oiler Andy Moog and the Boston Bruins and the all important opening game went into double overtime. Even as the game reached the second overtime, Edmonton coach John Muckler kept Klima sitting on the bench for almost the entire game. Klima finally got a chance to play in the second overtime as the Oilers were forced to use him in order to get some fresh legs on the ice. Klima proceeded to wire a shot past an off-balanced Moog. The Oilers won the first game and went on to defeat the Boston Bruins in 5 games to capture their 5th Cup in 7 years.

vancityluongo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 12:53 PM
  #123
seventieslord
Student Of The Game
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 30,158
vCash: 500
Possibly the biggest slacker of all-time? His inconsistency made Kovalev look like Ronnie Francis!

Very talented, though, and I knew it was just a matter of time before he was picked. I was well aware he was available, but I can't exactly put Klima on a team that already has Yashin!

seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 03:06 PM
  #124
vancityluongo
Twin Benning
 
vancityluongo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Edmonton
Country: Canada
Posts: 13,463
vCash: 1070
Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Possibly the biggest slacker of all-time? His inconsistency made Kovalev look like Ronnie Francis!

Very talented, though, and I knew it was just a matter of time before he was picked. I was well aware he was available, but I can't exactly put Klima on a team that already has Yashin!
Hmm, sounds like both our teams are in need of a coach that knows how to get the best out of their players... *cough*MY NEXT PICK *cough*

vancityluongo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
02-17-2008, 03:13 PM
  #125
God Bless Canada
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Bentley reunion
Country: Canada
Posts: 11,793
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by vancityluongo View Post
Although a very different player from Bob Kelly, who was hard working and had no limits to his determination, Alfredshems IK select a very talented Czech that we believe should also have gone in one of the two previous drafts, LW Petr Klima.


http://redwingslegends.blogspot.com/2007/03/petr-klima.html
There are some guys I'll never pick on my team. He's near the top. Lazy, inconsistent, a floater, but if his head's on straight, he's one of the best offensive talents available.

Funny story. When my family was living in northern B.C., we went to Edmonton for my birthday in 86. Dad took me to an Oilers/Red Wings game - my first-ever NHL game. (I still have the tickets and the program at my parents farm in B.C.). Edmonton won 4-3. It was back when they still had all those all-time greats. For whatever reason, they announced the three stars starting with the first star. That was Gretzky. I think Messier was the second star. They jumped over the boards after they were introduced. Klima was the third star. He decided he would jump over the boards, too, just like the Oilers. He tripped on the boards, and fell flat on his face.

God Bless Canada is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:53 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2017 All Rights Reserved.