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Changing your workout routine

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03-09-2008, 01:44 PM
  #1
Riggins
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Changing your workout routine

Hey, I'd like some tips/pointers for my workout routine and how I should alter it to get the best results. How often should you alter your routine? Every couple of months?

I used to work out quite a bit a few years ago. I started working out again 3 times a week a couple of months ago but now I'm back to a physically demanding job so I've had to cut it down to 2 days a week. I've been doing this for the past while and have seen pretty good results:

Wednesday:

Biceps - Dumbbell Curls, Standing Barbell Curls

Back - Seated Row, Lat Pulldown, Dumbbell Bent-Over Row

Shoulders - Shoulder Press (machine), Dumbbell Lateral Raise, Shrugs

Saturday:

Chest - Bench Press, Chest Press (machine), Dumbbell Flyes

Triceps - Tricep Press Down (cable), Dumbbell Tricep Extension

Legs - Safety Barbell Squats, Seated Leg Curl, Calf Raise, Leg Press


So I'll be looking to switch up some of these exercises so my muscles don't get too used to them (btw, is this a myth or truth?). There are certain ones I know I must keep like Bench Press and Squats. What other exercises do you suggest other than the ones I'm doing? There's not much else to do for Biceps other than what I'm doing. Should I switch the routine up almost entirely? Thanks.


Last edited by Riggins: 03-09-2008 at 01:52 PM.
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03-09-2008, 02:39 PM
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I do not believe a complete revamp of exercises is necessary, however it is good to switch up a few exercises to add some variation within workouts. It's not necessarily your muscles "getting used to the exercise", it's more an issue with boredom and lack of motivation after a while of doing the same thing over and over. It's also not a bad idea to switch up the number of sets/reps done per workout. For example, for a couple of weeks focus on strength and do 3 sets of 8 reps, then the next couple of weeks maybe focus on power, and lower the weight a little bit and perform the concentric part of the exercise as fast as you can for 3 sets of 8 reps. As for changing up some exercises:
For back, try a reverse pushup - using the smith machine bar, lay down underneath with your shoulders lined up with the bar. Grab the bar and pull yourself up. Chin ups as well.
For shoulders, maybe a dumbbell shoulder press, and upright rows are good as well.
For legs, single leg squats are great, use a bench behind you, flex your knee and rest your foot on the bench. Squat with the other leg, holding dumbbells, or maybe no weight to start. Walking lunges are good as well.

http://www.exrx.net/Lists/Directory.html

There's a good website for a variety of exercises for different parts of the body.

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03-09-2008, 03:46 PM
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Thanks for the pointers. You're right about the monotony part, I'm looking forward to substituting a few different exercises in.

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03-09-2008, 03:52 PM
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Frank Drebin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steadfast View Post
Hey, I'd like some tips/pointers for my workout routine and how I should alter it to get the best results. How often should you alter your routine? Every couple of months?

I used to work out quite a bit a few years ago. I started working out again 3 times a week a couple of months ago but now I'm back to a physically demanding job so I've had to cut it down to 2 days a week. I've been doing this for the past while and have seen pretty good results:

Wednesday:

Biceps - Dumbbell Curls, Standing Barbell Curls

Back - Seated Row, Lat Pulldown, Dumbbell Bent-Over Row

Shoulders - Shoulder Press (machine), Dumbbell Lateral Raise, Shrugs

Saturday:

Chest - Bench Press, Chest Press (machine), Dumbbell Flyes

Triceps - Tricep Press Down (cable), Dumbbell Tricep Extension

Legs - Safety Barbell Squats, Seated Leg Curl, Calf Raise, Leg Press


So I'll be looking to switch up some of these exercises so my muscles don't get too used to them (btw, is this a myth or truth?). There are certain ones I know I must keep like Bench Press and Squats. What other exercises do you suggest other than the ones I'm doing? There's not much else to do for Biceps other than what I'm doing. Should I switch the routine up almost entirely? Thanks.
I think your body does get used to doing the same exercises over and over again and you need to shock it once in a while. I've found that after 3-4 months I start to plateau and I switch it up.

This is my routine:

Back/Bi's

Chin ups or Pullups
Bent over or Pendlay Rows
Dumbell Rows
Curls (hammer, BB, or EZ bar)
Deadlifts

Chest/Tri

BB bench (switch to DB bench press which is much better IMO)
Decline Flyes supersetted with press
Incline Bench BB or DB
Skull crusher
Close Grip BP

Legs/Shoulder

Squats
Military Press
Arnold Press
Dumbell shoulder Press
Front Rows
Barbell Lunges (make you puke)

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03-09-2008, 10:27 PM
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The n00b King
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Ok, i would like to contribute to this thread because what i see is a lot of people who are misinformed as to what they should be doing to work out.

The first question you want to ask yourself is:

Do i want to be hugely muscular for just the sake of it (with added sluggishness)?

or

Do i want to be athletic, ripped and quick?

Because what i see is a bunch of people who seem to have learned to work out from muscle magazines like "Muscle" or wtv, and believe me, what you are doing completely and utterly undermines your physical fitness and to be more efficient at sports.

What you guys need to understand is that the type of exercises you need to be doing cannot be the movement limiting stuff like dumbell curls and such (not only that, but they cause muscle atrophy, flexibilty and actual use) because they will seriously hamper athletic performances.

What you need to be doing is Power training. You're probably thinking along the lines of Olympic Power training when i say this, because usually, power training is used specifically in Olympic weightlifting. But the reality is, all athletes power life, and for a few very good reasons.

1) It uses natural body movements, movements that you would do every day (when was the last time you need to perform a dumb bell curl to lift something else then a dumb bell?)

2) It increases: muscle mass, muscle resistance, muscle endurance, cardiovascular endurance, speed, power and strength.

3) Can be done in less then an hour and will absolutely "kill" you (in the sense that you cannot get a better workout).

Instead of going into further details, i HIGHLY suggest you guys look into this book:

"Power Training: build bigger, stronger muscles through performance-based conditioning" by Robert does Remedios, MA, CSCS

http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/...medios+-+Books

The sad thing is that most folks dont really have any real good idea of how to work out and pick up the odd magazine here and there and go from there.

But that's not really any good.

I would also recommend you to avoid any smith machines as they seriously limit your range of movement and do not help you develop the secondary muscles that would be used to perform the movement.

Im not saying that you should completely kill these static movements, but they should never be the focus of your workouts.

Keep one thing in mind: train your body parts in ways that makes them more efficient and you'll gain awesome results.

(btw, if it makes any difference to you, the guy who wrote that book trains division one athletes...which is no small feat).

Enjoy!

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03-10-2008, 05:50 AM
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I'm pretty sure he is not an elite athlete. He said he just began working out. If you were training sport specifically, yes power training is key. For the average Joe just beginning to workout, you wouldn't prescribe power lifts, since it requires very good technique without hurting yourself. I agree, biceps are useless for sports. But for many people who workout for cosmetic and health purposes, I don't see anything wrong with 1 or 2 exercises a week for the biceps.

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03-10-2008, 06:01 AM
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anyone know an online resource for power training?

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03-10-2008, 07:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue_and_White View Post
I'm pretty sure he is not an elite athlete. He said he just began working out. If you were training sport specifically, yes power training is key. For the average Joe just beginning to workout, you wouldn't prescribe power lifts, since it requires very good technique without hurting yourself. I agree, biceps are useless for sports. But for many people who workout for cosmetic and health purposes, I don't see anything wrong with 1 or 2 exercises a week for the biceps.
i disagree actually

You dont have to take it all the way, but it's still better to develop the power training techniques (which arent very complicated when you get started, btw) over atrophy training like static weight lifting. Not only are you gonna limit your range of movements but you're going to be doing a lot more work for nothing. Power training focuses on working out your entire body (which is key) with nearly every exercise, whereas isolation stuff doesnt (aside from being kinda useless).

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03-10-2008, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Dominant Hegemony View Post
Ok, i would like to contribute to this thread because what i see is a lot of people who are misinformed as to what they should be doing to work out.
Depends what your goals are. If you want to become better for a sport, then bodybuilding is not the way to go. If you want to increase size, strength, appearance and confidence then bodybuilding is definitely a good option.

BTW, you're not going to get "hugely muscular" overnight. It takes a lot of work to get "huge" and it is not every body builders goal.

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03-10-2008, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Dominant Hegemony View Post
i disagree actually

You dont have to take it all the way, but it's still better to develop the power training techniques (which arent very complicated when you get started, btw) over atrophy training like static weight lifting. Not only are you gonna limit your range of movements but you're going to be doing a lot more work for nothing. Power training focuses on working out your entire body (which is key) with nearly every exercise, whereas isolation stuff doesnt (aside from being kinda useless).
No one is saying to do isolation exercises. Squats, deadlifts, bench press, chins, military press etc. are all compound exercises and use a lot of different muscles.

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03-10-2008, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Frank Drebin View Post
Depends what your goals are. If you want to become better for a sport, then bodybuilding is not the way to go. If you want to increase size, strength, appearance and confidence then bodybuilding is definitely a good option.

BTW, you're not going to get "hugely muscular" overnight. It takes a lot of work to get "huge" and it is not every body builders goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Drebin View Post
No one is saying to do isolation exercises. Squats, deadlifts, bench press, chins, military press etc. are all compound exercises and use a lot of different muscles.
ok so if your goal is to become an athletic mannequin, that's your choice. But in all frankness, it serves very little actual purpose outside the aesthetic one...

and i was refering strictly to isolation exercises being pretty useless. Compound is the way to go. Especially exercises that work more then one plane.

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03-10-2008, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Dominant Hegemony View Post
ok so if your goal is to become an athletic mannequin, that's your choice. But in all frankness, it serves very little actual purpose outside the aesthetic one...

and i was refering strictly to isolation exercises being pretty useless. Compound is the way to go. Especially exercises that work more then one plane.
Not everyone is an athlete. Some people may have the goal of changing their physique, without caring about increasing their power. Of course a biceps curl is useless for sports and athletes are going to be performing mainly compound exercises. That doesn't mean everyone is training for the same reason they are.

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03-10-2008, 10:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Blue_and_White View Post
Not everyone is an athlete. Some people may have the goal of changing their physique, without caring about increasing their power. Of course a biceps curl is useless for sports and athletes are going to be performing mainly compound exercises. That doesn't mean everyone is training for the same reason they are.
you're missing the point though

there is no better form of full body work outs. I dont see why anybody would want just to have big arms or big legs, you'd end up looking disproportionate. This is why Power Training is king, because it words a series of muscles intensely and evenly. Isolation does no such thing.

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03-10-2008, 10:26 PM
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Frank Drebin
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Originally Posted by Dominant Hegemony View Post
you're missing the point though

there is no better form of full body work outs. I dont see why anybody would want just to have big arms or big legs, you'd end up looking disproportionate. This is why Power Training is king, because it words a series of muscles intensely and evenly. Isolation does no such thing.
You're missing the point, actually. Bodybuilding is not about isolation exercises. In fact, there is no way that someone just starting out should even think about doing isolation exercises. Big compound lifts to build up mass and then do isolation exercises to bring up weak points.

I agree that bb'ing is more for looks than it is practical, but going back to what I said earlier, each person has different goals. If you're a 6'2" 150lb beanpole who is sick of looking so skinny, bb'ing is your best bet.

If you're naturally muscular and are happy with the size and shape of your body, but want to improve for a sport, then maybe something like you mentioned or a sport suited training regimen would be a better bet for you.

Neither one is a bad thing, but to say that one program is "king" for everyone is being a bit narrow minded.

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03-11-2008, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Dominant Hegemony View Post
you're missing the point though

there is no better form of full body work outs. I dont see why anybody would want just to have big arms or big legs, you'd end up looking disproportionate. This is why Power Training is king, because it words a series of muscles intensely and evenly. Isolation does no such thing.
How do you figure you'd look disproportionate if you are working your whole body through body building? Body building does not just include the biceps and quads.

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