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04-23-2008, 12:01 PM
  #1
superstar436
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Hockey related technical question

I have been one of these guys that have been questionning Guy carbonneau use of some wingers poistioning. These are A koty, S kosty, latendresse, and Ryder. To me Latendresse and A kosty are more comfortable on RW but they are used on the left. s kosty plays both depending on who the other winger is, but most of the time he has been playing RW. Ryder who is the only RH shooter on the top 6 has been playing RW since he stopped playing with ribs. He WAS good on both, but I prefered him on the LW because his strength is the one timer or just his quick wrister which would give him more advantage if he played LW.

My question is are there or what are the advantages defensively and offensively in all 3 zones of any hockey player player on the opposite wing. (One of the most obvious is the shot angle in the offensive zone)The reason why I ask this is that dany Dube said that it is much safer defensively for a LH shooter to play LW and I did not grasp that. Could it be that this is the reason why Carbo has been using these guys at there current position because we all know that Tender and A kosty played most of their pre-nhl careers on the RW.

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04-23-2008, 12:04 PM
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Ice Poutine
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All i can think of is that it is easier to stop the puck along the boards for a LH shooter playing LW who could stop a puck and not need to turn around to make a play like centering it.

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04-23-2008, 12:08 PM
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dbbourn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ice Poutine View Post
All i can think of is that it is easier to stop the puck along the boards for a LH shooter playing LW who could stop a puck and not need to turn around to make a play like centering it.
I was thinking the same thing. Playing the puck up the boards rather than up the middle is a benefit. Also, when the puck is on your stick in the defensive zone you are probably likely to see more of the ice.

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04-23-2008, 12:14 PM
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guapo23
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In the offensive zone playing on your off-wing is a huge advantage - better shooting & passing angles.

In the defensive zone it is sometimes a liability because on the breakout you often have to use your backhand. Which is a weak way of clearing the puck or making a breakout pass.

When your teamate passes to you to breakout, you often have to turn your back to the other teams d's on the blueline in order to trap the puck well on your forehand.

To minimize the risk, the winger should be waiting below the top of the circle for the pass. That way you are far enough from the other team's D on the blue line that it is very risky for him to pinch in and try to intercept the breakout pass.

If the D tries to pinch in you have an extra second to trap the puck and make a pass. You can either pass to a teamate cutting diagonally towards you from the other side or you can just chip it off the boards for your teamate to retrieve.

That's the secret to minimizing the defensive liablity of playing on your off wing.
Stay between the Hash Marks & the top of the circle when waiting for the pass.
It's too far from their D so you gain time & space.
Likewise, it is easy for your team to make you a short quick pass.
Much easier then trying to hit you for the long lob hail mary breakaway pass in the neutral zone.

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04-23-2008, 12:42 PM
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cmb63
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Easier to dig the puck off the boards if wrapped around for break out, but I like playing the off wing for offensive purposes. Because as a righty, I like being able to cut through the middle and shoot on my forehand, while being able to protect the puck from the d-man with my body so I prefer LW. It also works to your advantage for one-timers because you can square yourself to the play and just wait to tee one off, same deal as back door. You can just slam it home if your sitting back door squared and on your forehand, which is how it is on the opposite wing.

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04-23-2008, 01:25 PM
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superstar436
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so does any one think that for these reasons carbo does not want to play aksoty and tender on the RW

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04-23-2008, 02:40 PM
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number 11
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also it's easier to protect the puck when you're cutting towards the net. i shoot left and play right wing and when i cut to the net from the right side i just stick out my left arm...easier than cutting in from the left side and putting out the knee.

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