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Old
06-18-2008, 11:52 AM
  #26
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Good job.

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06-18-2008, 12:00 PM
  #27
SeanL44
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I'll let you know if I feel any different at the end of my workout... like not enough energy or whatever

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06-18-2008, 01:33 PM
  #28
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keep it up man!

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Old
06-18-2008, 01:39 PM
  #29
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I agree whole-heartedly with the recommendations to do high-intensity interval training. In many regards, it is good for a hockey player to train similarly to a sprinter in track and field. As for doing sprint intervals on machines, I would say that actually running is better than many machines, or actually riding a bike is better, just because it recruits more athleticism and more actual leg thrust into things. I'm not a big fan of treadmills for athletes, because that becomes more about you keep up with a belt rather than truly propelling yourself.

Consider adding hill workouts (sprinting up a hill, then walking back down at a decent clip). This is a type of high-intensity interval training and it will add to your power. If you really want to challenge your footspeed, consider running down a grassy hill (this will certainly force you to improve your footspeed, although there is some danger involved).

Doing distance runs can be counterproductive for a hockey player. It is not bad to have a good aerobic base, but hockey is more about anaerobic conditioning. So, a 60-minute run for a hockey player, especially if done at a leisurely pace, really isn't going to help functionally. (There are also a lot of body building exercises in the weight room that are not really functional for hockey or most other sports either.) If a player's conditioning is so poor that anaerobic training is dangerous for him (or her) at that point, that is one thing, but that does not sound like it's the case here.

Plyometrics are also very good for hockey players, but they must be done properly. A person does not get full benefit of just going through the motions. They have to be done fast and/or with explosiveness if you're going to get the full benefit. Just doing box jumps or step ups for 30 seconds is not the same as going through the motions just to get it done. This will actually be somewhat counterproductive, too.

It's the old saying of "you play how you practice."

Diet is very important and you've already received some decent advice, but one thing I would also pay attention to is sleep. Sleep is very, very important in the functioning of our bodies, both in rebuilding and building. I would need to know your daily schedule to make helpful suggestions on this front, on when you should consider getting to bed and consider getting up to get your workout in. There is more than one way to approach this, such as wake up early and boost your body's metabolism for the whole day (which is optimal) or do it at night a little while before you go to bed to ensure you do actually get enough sleep and aren't tempted to stay up late and then have to make a 5:00 a.m. workout in the morning. I have read about NFL football players (both in the "skill positions" and the "non-skill positions") having success with this method, because it ensured they got enough sleep and helped keep them away from distractions at night that could detract from their training.

The very best training you could do would be high-intensity interval training on the ice, but ice time can be expensive. I'd certainly consider looking for any camps that do this sort of thing during the summer in your area. (It's hard to be able to do this well unless you have most of the ice surface to yourself or with others who are doing the same thing.) A lot of pick-up hockey and "stick and puck" (or whatever it's called in your area) can actually train your body in a negative way in terms of functional conditioning for hockey, unless you are very disciplined how hard you play and for how long. It's very easy to train yourself to have poor functional cardiovascular conditioning for hockey in pick-up hockey and stick and puck.

As someone else mentioned, pool workouts are also very useful, especially since they are low impact and are a total body workout if done properly. The negatives with running are that you can develop shin splints, stress fractures, and other such injuries. If a person takes the proper precautions and trains properly, these pitfalls can be avoided or significantly reduced, and this includes proper footwear, and quite possibly orthotics (I myself have flat feet and I use orthotics in my shoes and skates and am very aware of how important they are in allowing me to train properly and avoid nagging injuries). Hopefully for you, you have proper/optimal foot construction.

Certainly feel free to private message me if you'd like, as it is a joy to help players who want to improve to make those improvements (and I bet most everyone who has responded to your thread is in the same boat on that).

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06-18-2008, 02:05 PM
  #30
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Wow ^

---

After reading this post, I did some research on HIIT and I got PUMPED. It looks awesome, and I tried it yesterday for about 20minutes and wow I was winded and dripping sweat. The effects are supposed to jack your metabolism up to 9x its normal rate and is perfect for weight loss. I will definately be doing HIIT on my offdays from weights.

This forum is helping a lot with my working out, thanks everyone.

(Sorry to hijack your thread bud)

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Old
06-18-2008, 02:07 PM
  #31
SeanL44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Wey View Post
I agree whole-heartedly with the recommendations to do high-intensity interval training. In many regards, it is good for a hockey player to train similarly to a sprinter in track and field. As for doing sprint intervals on machines, I would say that actually running is better than many machines, or actually riding a bike is better, just because it recruits more athleticism and more actual leg thrust into things. I'm not a big fan of treadmills for athletes, because that becomes more about you keep up with a belt rather than truly propelling yourself.

Consider adding hill workouts (sprinting up a hill, then walking back down at a decent clip). This is a type of high-intensity interval training and it will add to your power. If you really want to challenge your footspeed, consider running down a grassy hill (this will certainly force you to improve your footspeed, although there is some danger involved).

Doing distance runs can be counterproductive for a hockey player. It is not bad to have a good aerobic base, but hockey is more about anaerobic conditioning. So, a 60-minute run for a hockey player, especially if done at a leisurely pace, really isn't going to help functionally. (There are also a lot of body building exercises in the weight room that are not really functional for hockey or most other sports either.) If a player's conditioning is so poor that anaerobic training is dangerous for him (or her) at that point, that is one thing, but that does not sound like it's the case here.

Plyometrics are also very good for hockey players, but they must be done properly. A person does not get full benefit of just going through the motions. They have to be done fast and/or with explosiveness if you're going to get the full benefit. Just doing box jumps or step ups for 30 seconds is not the same as going through the motions just to get it done. This will actually be somewhat counterproductive, too.

It's the old saying of "you play how you practice."

Diet is very important and you've already received some decent advice, but one thing I would also pay attention to is sleep. Sleep is very, very important in the functioning of our bodies, both in rebuilding and building. I would need to know your daily schedule to make helpful suggestions on this front, on when you should consider getting to bed and consider getting up to get your workout in. There is more than one way to approach this, such as wake up early and boost your body's metabolism for the whole day (which is optimal) or do it at night a little while before you go to bed to ensure you do actually get enough sleep and aren't tempted to stay up late and then have to make a 5:00 a.m. workout in the morning. I have read about NFL football players (both in the "skill positions" and the "non-skill positions") having success with this method, because it ensured they got enough sleep and helped keep them away from distractions at night that could detract from their training.

The very best training you could do would be high-intensity interval training on the ice, but ice time can be expensive. I'd certainly consider looking for any camps that do this sort of thing during the summer in your area. (It's hard to be able to do this well unless you have most of the ice surface to yourself or with others who are doing the same thing.) A lot of pick-up hockey and "stick and puck" (or whatever it's called in your area) can actually train your body in a negative way in terms of functional conditioning for hockey, unless you are very disciplined how hard you play and for how long. It's very easy to train yourself to have poor functional cardiovascular conditioning for hockey in pick-up hockey and stick and puck.

As someone else mentioned, pool workouts are also very useful, especially since they are low impact and are a total body workout if done properly. The negatives with running are that you can develop shin splints, stress fractures, and other such injuries. If a person takes the proper precautions and trains properly, these pitfalls can be avoided or significantly reduced, and this includes proper footwear, and quite possibly orthotics (I myself have flat feet and I use orthotics in my shoes and skates and am very aware of how important they are in allowing me to train properly and avoid nagging injuries). Hopefully for you, you have proper/optimal foot construction.

Certainly feel free to private message me if you'd like, as it is a joy to help players who want to improve to make those improvements (and I bet most everyone who has responded to your thread is in the same boat on that).
Hey thanks alot for your post. Two things quickly before I reply.. I go to a training center near my house and I have a trainer help me with my plyometrics and my skating. Yes, skating... they have a treadmill about 6 feet wide and 6 feet long made out of Viking Ice and I am able to skate on it... usually, we raise the elevation so I'm actually skating uphill to a certain extent and I do some HIIT training on that.

Here is my *typical* schedule:

Monday - Wake up at 845 - go to work - 2 hours of HIIT skating - 11 pm bed
Tuesday - Wake up at 7 and do conditioning/core workout from 715-815 - go to work - 2 hours of plyo - 11pm bed
Wednesday - Wakeup at 845 - go to work - 2 hours of HIIT skating - 11pm bed
Thursday - Wakeup at 7 and do conditioning/core workout from 715-815 - go to work - Afternoon run/afternoon off for some rest and xbox - 11pm bed
Friday - Wakeup at 7 and do conditioning/core workout from 715-815 - go to work - 2 hours of Open Hockey friday night - 1 am bed (open hockey runs late)
Saturday - Morning off, no work.... open hockey at 12 noon, relaxed skate at 7pm, open hockey at 930 - 1 am bed
Sunday - wake up at 9 am for church - Open hockey at 1pm, afternoon off/light run, bed at 11

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Old
06-18-2008, 02:10 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjun View Post
Wow ^

---

After reading this post, I did some research on HIIT and I got PUMPED. It looks awesome, and I tried it yesterday for about 20minutes and wow I was winded and dripping sweat. The effects are supposed to jack your metabolism up to 9x its normal rate and is perfect for weight loss. I will definately be doing HIIT on my offdays from weights.

This forum is helping a lot with my working out, thanks everyone.

(Sorry to hijack your thread bud)
HIIT is pretty awesome, and no worries... this isn't my thread, it's for everyone in my situation haha

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Old
06-18-2008, 03:25 PM
  #33
WhipNash27
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HIIT is tough stuff. It's very rewarding if you can stick to it. If you're already running 2-3 miles a day, your body is probably ready for HIIT. I mean you can do it at a low fitness level, but I think that it's best to first get your body into running shape before you try it, that's my opinion anyway.

BTW, what kind of food are you eating? Like what do you eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner? Do you/your family cook your own meals and what kind? If you go out to eat a lot, that'll contribute a lot to your fatness. Every time I go out to eat I cringe to think how much fat and junk I'm taking in. Anything you eat short of a salad with oil & vinegar is going to be ridiculously fattening. Take up cooking if no one in your family really does it. Not only is it a great feeling to eat a meal that you made, but it's much more healthy than eating out and you know what you're putting into it.

Try to limit eating out to like once or twice a month if you can. Of course, lunch is usually much harder because you're not home, so try either bringing lunch to work/school or going somewhere at least a bit more healthy like Subway instead of McDonalds. At the same time if you're going to Subway stick to the low fat selection.

That should help you a bit on your food quest.

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Old
06-18-2008, 03:31 PM
  #34
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Originally Posted by PruBlue25 View Post
HIIT is tough stuff. It's very rewarding if you can stick to it. If you're already running 2-3 miles a day, your body is probably ready for HIIT. I mean you can do it at a low fitness level, but I think that it's best to first get your body into running shape before you try it, that's my opinion anyway.

BTW, what kind of food are you eating? Like what do you eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner? Do you/your family cook your own meals and what kind? If you go out to eat a lot, that'll contribute a lot to your fatness. Every time I go out to eat I cringe to think how much fat and junk I'm taking in. Anything you eat short of a salad with oil & vinegar is going to be ridiculously fattening. Take up cooking if no one in your family really does it. Not only is it a great feeling to eat a meal that you made, but it's much more healthy than eating out and you know what you're putting into it.

Try to limit eating out to like once or twice a month if you can. Of course, lunch is usually much harder because you're not home, so try either bringing lunch to work/school or going somewhere at least a bit more healthy like Subway instead of McDonalds. At the same time if you're going to Subway stick to the low fat selection.

That should help you a bit on your food quest.


Thanks for your post, read the rest of the thread if you have some time . I already do a decent amount of HIIT and have changed my diet plans... a weekly schedule of my workouts is a couple posts above ^^

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Old
06-18-2008, 04:03 PM
  #35
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Originally Posted by ECLions44 View Post
Hey thanks alot for your post. Two things quickly before I reply.. I go to a training center near my house and I have a trainer help me with my plyometrics and my skating. Yes, skating... they have a treadmill about 6 feet wide and 6 feet long made out of Viking Ice and I am able to skate on it... usually, we raise the elevation so I'm actually skating uphill to a certain extent and I do some HIIT training on that.

Here is my *typical* schedule:

Monday - Wake up at 845 - go to work - 2 hours of HIIT skating - 11 pm bed
Tuesday - Wake up at 7 and do conditioning/core workout from 715-815 - go to work - 2 hours of plyo - 11pm bed
Wednesday - Wakeup at 845 - go to work - 2 hours of HIIT skating - 11pm bed
Thursday - Wakeup at 7 and do conditioning/core workout from 715-815 - go to work - Afternoon run/afternoon off for some rest and xbox - 11pm bed
Friday - Wakeup at 7 and do conditioning/core workout from 715-815 - go to work - 2 hours of Open Hockey friday night - 1 am bed (open hockey runs late)
Saturday - Morning off, no work.... open hockey at 12 noon, relaxed skate at 7pm, open hockey at 930 - 1 am bed
Sunday - wake up at 9 am for church - Open hockey at 1pm, afternoon off/light run, bed at 11
Admittedly, I am not an expert, but if you are doing two hours of HIIT, you are either Superman, or not doing it entirely correctly. You should be wiped after a 15-20 minute session.

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Old
06-18-2008, 04:41 PM
  #36
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Sorry, I meat HIIT AND skating.. thanks for pointing that out.


Usually we do 15 minutes of HIIT, 5 minute break, 20 minute skate, 5 minute break 15 minutes of HIIT etc. etc.

and yea, sometimes I have trouble walking for the night after that haha

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06-18-2008, 07:48 PM
  #37
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Quick update,

I just got back from the gym... I felt really good today and my workout went awesome, I kept up my energy the whole time and came out refreshed... I just finished up a small cup of yogurt and I'm thinking about hitting the sack early tonight.

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Old
06-18-2008, 11:19 PM
  #38
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Not to hijack this thread, but I don't want to create another topic:

I'm currently 18 years old at 5'11" and 155-160lbs. I have a decent frame for my height, but I don't have much muscle since I've never worked out or done much strenuous physical activity. I am really looking to add some muscle mass, and hopefully grow to 175lbs.

I don't have the time to hit the gym, but I got a job at a lumber warehouse this summer, and I get a great workout carrying 2x6, 2x8, 6x6, propane tanks, plywood, sheetrock, etc., etc. I know this doesn't do justice to real gym workouts, but I think it will suffice.

Can someone recommend a feasible diet and suggest the best foods to eat? How many grams of protein should I intake per day? What should I avoid other than the obvious (soda, candy, etc.)? I skip breakfast, but have a muscle milk every day before work, and try to have a high protein dinner right after work (today it was a fried egg sandwich and a roast beef sandwich, often times its Chinese chicken). Lunch is a problem, since Subway is the only real option. What would be an easy lunch to pack that would provide me with a lot of protein and energy for the day?

Thanks!

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Old
06-18-2008, 11:34 PM
  #39
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Originally Posted by Feed Me A Stray Cat View Post
Not to hijack this thread, but I don't want to create another topic:

I'm currently 18 years old at 5'11" and 155-160lbs. I have a decent frame for my height, but I don't have much muscle since I've never worked out or done much strenuous physical activity. I am really looking to add some muscle mass, and hopefully grow to 175lbs.

I don't have the time to hit the gym, but I got a job at a lumber warehouse this summer, and I get a great workout carrying 2x6, 2x8, 6x6, propane tanks, plywood, sheetrock, etc., etc. I know this doesn't do justice to real gym workouts, but I think it will suffice.

Can someone recommend a feasible diet and suggest the best foods to eat? How many grams of protein should I intake per day? What should I avoid other than the obvious (soda, candy, etc.)? I skip breakfast, but have a muscle milk every day before work, and try to have a high protein dinner right after work (today it was a fried egg sandwich and a roast beef sandwich, often times its Chinese chicken). Lunch is a problem, since Subway is the only real option. What would be an easy lunch to pack that would provide me with a lot of protein and energy for the day?

Thanks!



Hey, if you read the rest of the thread, you might find some answers to your questions. Also concerning your breakfast... it really is the most important meal of the day... try fitting in a cereal like Smart Start.

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06-26-2008, 07:17 PM
  #40
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Quick update: I've lost 8 pounds already... that seems on the verge of unhealthy to me... as in too much weight loss in too little time (is that possible?)

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06-26-2008, 10:57 PM
  #41
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Sorry, I meat HIIT AND skating.. thanks for pointing that out.


Usually we do 15 minutes of HIIT, 5 minute break, 20 minute skate, 5 minute break 15 minutes of HIIT etc. etc.

and yea, sometimes I have trouble walking for the night after that
haha
Thats what my girlfriend says all the time.

But I think I might get going with HIIT as well, seems good for upping my stamina and endurance

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06-27-2008, 07:55 AM
  #42
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Originally Posted by Arjun View Post
Wow ^

---

After reading this post, I did some research on HIIT and I got PUMPED. It looks awesome, and I tried it yesterday for about 20minutes and wow I was winded and dripping sweat. The effects are supposed to jack your metabolism up to 9x its normal rate and is perfect for weight loss. I will definately be doing HIIT on my offdays from weights.

This forum is helping a lot with my working out, thanks everyone.

(Sorry to hijack your thread bud)
Not only does HIIT crank up your metabolic rate but it will continue to burn fat up to 36 hours after you performed it.
And like it's been mentioned before, HIIT is much better for retaining muscle as traditional, long cardio exercises will burn muscle to sustain energy.

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06-27-2008, 08:09 AM
  #43
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Originally Posted by ECLions44 View Post
Quick update: I've lost 8 pounds already... that seems on the verge of unhealthy to me... as in too much weight loss in too little time (is that possible?)
That is possible, but moreso if you are already in good shape.

Usually you only want to lose 2-3 lbs per week. I wouldn't worry about the 8 lbs you lost already. When I first got on my diet at 250, I lost 10 lbs in a week. Your body will adjust as it gets use to your new lifestyle.

Keep up the good work.

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06-27-2008, 08:15 AM
  #44
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Originally Posted by ECLions44 View Post
Quick update: I've lost 8 pounds already... that seems on the verge of unhealthy to me... as in too much weight loss in too little time (is that possible?)
The only thing you have to worry about is going below your ideal body weight. I was right around the low side of the window and my doctor was all over me about it.

I wouldn't worry too much about it as long as you feel good. If you are at your target weight and you are still dropping pounds. You might have to add some extra calories to your diet due to the amount of cardio you do.

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06-27-2008, 09:24 AM
  #45
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Originally Posted by ECLions44 View Post
Quick update: I've lost 8 pounds already... that seems on the verge of unhealthy to me... as in too much weight loss in too little time (is that possible?)
Not for someone your size.
You said you're 6'1" and 240 with a belly and 'man boobs'.
I'm not meaning any offense to you, but after reading that description I assume you never weight lift and any muscle you have is natural and not manufactured.
So saying that, I'd guess that your body fat % is around 25%.
Most guys, no matter how fat usually don't have it on their legs. Men gain weight in different areas than women. The first place they gain weight is in their thighs and buttocks. Men will gain first at the love-handle region and work their way up.

So saying that, losing 8lbs in that short of time is healthy for someone of your size and something you should be proud of.

Keep up the great work!

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06-27-2008, 10:57 AM
  #46
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Originally Posted by ECLions44 View Post
Quick update: I've lost 8 pounds already... that seems on the verge of unhealthy to me... as in too much weight loss in too little time (is that possible?)
water weight, its fine.

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Old
06-27-2008, 12:38 PM
  #47
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Originally Posted by DolemitesP1mpHand View Post
Not for someone your size.
You said you're 6'1" and 240 with a belly and 'man boobs'.
I'm not meaning any offense to you, but after reading that description I assume you never weight lift and any muscle you have is natural and not manufactured.
So saying that, I'd guess that your body fat % is around 25%.
Most guys, no matter how fat usually don't have it on their legs. Men gain weight in different areas than women. The first place they gain weight is in their thighs and buttocks. Men will gain first at the love-handle region and work their way up.

So saying that, losing 8lbs in that short of time is healthy for someone of your size and something you should be proud of.

Keep up the great work!
my bf is 21% when I checked last week.... might be a tad bit lower now after losing the 8 pounds but I dont know much about body fat percentage... as for weight lifting, I don't do it that often however 2 times a week I do some circuit lifting

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